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Not a bad portfolio I suppose. ;)

His prototype machinist must have been non-stop busy.
 

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Ma Duce? How many more if the knock offs where added?
 

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I suspect that list is incomplete - in fact, I know it is. JMB did much of the development work on the P-35 Hi-Power, although his assistant (and later FN Chief Engineer) Dieudonne Saive is supposed to have completed the work after JMB's death. Saive went on the develop the FN49 and later the FAL rifles.

Dieudonne Saive
 

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The 9mm automatic rifle near the bottom is the Belgium made version of the Remington Model 8, later 81. It was made over there first. JB took the plans to Winchester and they whiffed on it, so he went overseas to get it started.
Later Remington bought the patents and began making the Model 8 just a couple years after the Browning version.
I have a couple of the Remingtons, one model 8 in .25 Remington and a Model 81 in .30 Remington that we were shooting just today.
A close look at the safety style will have one supposing a certain Russian designer may have got his idea from this rifle many years later.
 

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Thanks for the post OP, nice to have all those in one spot
 

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I have a Browning High Power pistol. I thought he patented it as well?????
JMB passed away before completing the HiPower , See post #5 for
"The rest of the story" .
 

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The Superposed is just as controversial as the hi power since John’s son finished it.
 

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Decent article this month in American Rifleman; talks about his creative process. IIRC, his brother was his lead machinist.
 

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Decent article this month in American Rifleman; talks about his creative process. IIRC, his brother was his lead machinist.
I read that, and since acquired the newly published book that this information was revealed in. Turns out it was a court case over patent issues that caused John Browning to explain in detail his process for designing in his 3-D mind and working with his brother Ed to machine the pieces to assemble a prototype. We might never have known this kind of detail had there not been a patent dispute with Georg Luger!
 

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Forgotten Weapons on Youtube has a great story regarding the parting of the ways between Winchester and JMB. They had a working relationship where Winchesters lawyers would write the patents for Browning and he sold the gun for a lump sum. As he got older he wanted a royalty for each gun, and the then president of Winchester didn't want to pay it. Often Browning would bring the prototype to Winchester and they would then figure out just how to manufacture it so they could make money on it. He had done that with the 1897 pump shotgun and it had taken them more work to get it working the way they wanted it. So when JMB comes in with the Auto5 shortly after the president said not only won't I give you a royalty I won't buy your gun period. Browning then went to Remington and was actually in the office waiting to speak to Remington's president when the president dropped dead of a heart attack. No one on this side of the pond wanted a new untried "auto-matik" So since he had been dealing with FN for quite some time on pocket pistols he showed it to them and they said sure. Later when Remington got back on it's feet they got a crack at it, and Savage also built it.
 

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No picture of the Ithaca M37 (descended from the M17 Remington 20 ga.) and made in much greater numbers than the M17.

I remember seeing a .45 acp Colt named semi-auto pistol in a gun shop up in Arlington (??, maybe Fairfax??) 40 plus years ago. It was very similar to the 1911 pistol but no barrel bushing (two barrel links the store owner told me - on in the rear and one in the back). I don't remember if it had a grip safety or not. I thought it was a 1911 at first, it was so similar looking.

For some reason I thought the M92 was his last Winchester lever action rifle. I thought the M94 was designed by a different designer.

Did I miss the 1893 pump that preceded the M97? Or the lever action 10 and 12 ga. Winchester shotguns?
 

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The new book that was written by the author of the article on JMB in the latest American Rifleman is quite good:
 

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The way the tourguides tell it, JMB was the big genius around a LOT of stuff he didn't get credit for, mostly because he was working for someone else at the time.
His dad John was no slouch either, having concocted a sliding block black powder repeater, among other things. Although Sam Colt is known for the revolver, there is some dispute who came up with the revolving chambers with many pointing to dear old dad, John Browning. John Moses, the son, got into all the really cool stuff long after those 1840-45 days of dad's gunsmith shop.
 
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