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Input on this Super Match please

1162 Views 19 Replies 12 Participants Last post by  Teamamerica
Hello, I have always wanted a super match with the camo stock and a used one showed up at a local-ish gun shop. The only photos I have are from arms list so they are not the best. I can go to the shop and get better ones if needed. I have never had a bedded rifle before or any other M1a other than a standard woody and a std poly. The one photo that shows the close up of the receiver caught my attention, it looks like a gap between the stock and receiver. Is that normal/ok? Should there be bedding there? Any thing else look sketchy? Any help would be great.

thanks
Mike
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That gap helps with accuracy. Seems counter intuitive, but that's the reason. What's the asking price on that. Feel sorry for the guy that had to hock that for emergency cash
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the help. It’s one of those, get it while I can or wait and hope to get a better deal. Guess it comes down to how bad I want one.
Was looking into getting a Fulton barreled action and getting a new McMillan stock, but read the new stocks are having problems.
 

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Nice looking rifle.

No hi-jack intended, but...?

Would there be any concern with the "chew" marks on the op rod?

I realize the rifle is in the 15 year old range and you would see "character" in a previously owned rifle.

Would the rifle have been laid on the op rod side to protect the scope mount side?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Nice looking rifle.

No hi-jack intended, but...?

Would there be any concern with the "chew" marks on the op rod?

I realize the rifle is in the 15 year old range and you would see "character" in a previously owned rifle.

Would the rifle have been laid on the op rod side to protect the scope mount side?
The op rod does look chewed up pretty good. Almost like it landed on concrete or slid down a cinder block wall. If it’s still there on Monday I will go look in person. Hopefully they will take a lower offer.
 

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It looks good to me. I don't like the gobbed up op-rod handle though. Those chew-marks can be stoned down. You have to watch out for stainless steel bores. You can ruin one with improper maintenance: WRONG Brushes, WRONG chemicals - a whole lot easier than you can shoot one out. (5000 -> 9000 rounds maybe?) The bore is the heart of any rifle. If it is in excellent shape, it's good to go. Also, does the seller have a "Log Book of Fired Rounds"? Most rifles are neglected more than "shot-out" and I doubt that one was fired very much. The op-rod channel still has the parkerizing in it and the lugs on the bolt do not show any sign of wear/use. If you don't have a Match Grade M-14 clone and you believe you need one and can afford it, get it. PLUS, that one has a quality scope mount too.

Jarhead
 

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Eh, the op-rod handle has a little bench rash, no big deal. My pickup has a little scrape on the fender too.
Yeah, me too. I didn't have any rashes but I had a few bends,repaired breaks and scrapes (as do most jarheads) by the time my Babyluv said "I do" with me. She didn't seem to mind either.

Jarhead
 

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The gap refers to an area where the receiver is free floated (not bedded) from the rear of the stock liner extending to the bedded horse shoe area at the heal of the receiver. In military stocks, the area where the selector is located cannot be bedded. The opposite side is left unbedded to balance out the stress on the receiver from clamping pressure. The receiver is actually tweaked to a small degree, pulled down into the unbedded portion, to increase bedding stability. While many think this has no benefit when bedding commercial receivers, I have found that it works well and I always leave the gap when glass bedding. It even seems to have some benefit when bedding rear lugged receivers that include a torque screw, although it probably is not necessary.
 

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The gap refers to an area where the receiver is free floated (not bedded) from the rear of the stock liner extending to the bedded horse shoe area at the heal of the receiver. In military stocks, the area where the selector is located cannot be bedded. The opposite side is left unbedded to balance out the stress on the receiver from clamping pressure. The receiver is actually tweaked to a small degree, pulled down into the unbedded portion, to increase bedding stability. While many think this has no benefit when bedding commercial receivers, I have found that it works well and I always leave the gap when glass bedding. It even seems to have some benefit when bedding rear lugged receivers that include a torque screw, although it probably is not necessary.
Thank you for the explanation Ted. Is the area I delineated in this picture the "gap area?" To the untrained eye it looks like it is.
Paul


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