M14 Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,441 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,307 Posts
One of those Ah ha moments.. seems like a no brainer and yet complicated.. Non-toxic, Removable after the fact when medical care is available, Sterile, Fast Cure Time.. Etc. when this works and is widely available it will save Many Many lives!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
It sounds like... great stuff.
Pun definitely intended.
http://greatstuff.dow.com/products/

It's also a pretty cool piece science fiction encountered in the HALO universe. http://halo.wikia.com/wiki/Biofoam

So we'll just keep waiting for this concept to be perfected and made cheap enough for our personal med kits we keep in our vehicles and backpacks.
 

·
In the gilded halls of Valhala
Joined
·
13,515 Posts
Learn more about the application of a combat tourniquet.

In a broken arrow situation your going to lose the limb if you put a tourniquet and can't get medical help.

Better than death though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,672 Posts
I just recently attended a 'Care under fire' tactical first aid course for my department. I had already received tourniquet training in different firearms classes, but this course was aimed specifically at using the Combat Applications Tourniquet (CAT 2) on extremities and the use of gauze in center of mass and groin wounds.

A tourniquet can be left on for several hours without any damage to a limb. The important issue is to stop major bleeding. We were all issued an IPOK (IFAK) which included a CAT 2 tourniquet, two Quik Clot gauze packs and several rolls of gauze. Out first aid kits were also upgraded with several additional it such as emergency blankets and more gauze packs. I can definitely see where an injectable foam would be a great asset to wound treatment.

Stress was placed on taking care of the threat situation before administering care. Great course!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
973 Posts
Research on this has been going on for years. The biggest advantage is it helps retard the internals from drying out.
I was thinking maybe such a foam "plug" could seal a gut wound so the diaphram muscle would work and one could keep breathing. I was taught if someone had a perforated abdomen and was having difficulty breathing, it was because the diaphram had lost its seal. You put a piece of plastic over the hole, or a rag and keep it wet.
But I'm no medic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,441 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I watched Lone Survivor again recently and was thinking about the SEAL who was packing his gut wound with dirt....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,176 Posts
I watched Lone Survivor again recently and was thinking about the SEAL who was packing his gut wound with dirt....
Yeah, this...just not dirt from the ****pile.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,672 Posts
I was told that the purpose for packing wounds was to apply pressure on bleeding blood vessels the same as direct pressure or tourniquet use.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top