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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just shot this rifle for the first time since my dad shot it last over 20 years ago. Its a Springfield M1A with a sub 1500 serial number. The number is more like 0014xx with 2 leading zeroes in front of it. I don't know much about these rifles. It looks too new to be pre 1980, but I don't know. The fibreglass cover on the top is a forest green, with a steel flap on the end of the stock that holds the cleaning rod.

It has a stamp on the stock hand that looks like a Marine Corps symbol, but its very faint.

I am clueless on the rifle. Can someone tell me about when it was made, and to confirm its a commercial/civilian model?

BTW, this rifle put me on my ass. I went through 2 clips, and I had purple bruises on my shoulder.
 

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Your rifle is a civilian / commercial semi-automatic version of the M14 rifle. In the March, 1974 issue of American Rifleman magazine (pages 36 and 37) M1A serial number 001562 is tested by M. D. Waite, then Technical Editor for the American Rifleman. So, I'd guess your rifle was made in late 1973 or early 1974.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the info. It's a bit older than what I thought. I have a couple of other questions for you if you don't mind. When did they start production of these rifles? What is the encircled "P" for?

And could you point me to a link that explains on how to take care of this rifle?

Thanks much.
 

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If this is truely a Devine manufactured M1A it would make it highly desirable among M1A collectors. Treat it well, feed it only the finest Military Ball ammo.

Different's Web site is a good place to start learning. See his post above for the URL.

Oh, if you get bruises it means you're holding the rifle poorly. Hold it very firmly to your shoulder and weld your cheek to the comb of the stock.

PS
I get this when I posted my reply to this message
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I think it means that someone who has email watch turned on email service has black holed the m14 site as a source of spam. Make sure you whitelist messages from this site if you use that feature.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, that explains the address stamped on the barrel...

Thanks for the info guys.

There is an address stamped on the barrel of the rifle, I will have to go home and check to confirm it, but some guy with a po box in devine, tx.

I didn't know there was so much history to this rifle. I will check Different's website.

Are there other markings on the rifle I should look out for?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I read that book. Really good information

That was a very informative book. Thanks for the info.

Warbird, you said not to use the stock cleaning rod as it would ruin the barrel. I have cleaned it twice with it, should I be ok? And what cleaning rod should I use?

I have a bipod and bayonet that came with it. The bipod looks like it connects metal on metal. Will it scar the rifle if I connect the bipod for practice shooting?
 

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Sir,

First of all congratulations on what members here consider to be the best inhertance one could get!!

For a cleaning rod---order a dewey cleaning rod--one piece coated and for 30 caliber--it wont knick the crown or scar the rfiling--you also want to order a dewey rod guide rguide--this properly aligns the rod with the bore again so it wont knick your crown.

www.fultonarmory.com has the parts you need!

If the bipod you recieved is an original USGI issued m2 bipod you have a another collectors item--these have been known to catch prices of up towards 300 dollars, the most common are chinese repros which are still nice.

Clampinging the bipod on the gas cylinder area of your barrel may mar the finish--its up to you--my recomendation shoot it prone like it was menat to be---keep the questions coming!

--800
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the response, it will really help.

I will order one pretty quick. Can I get a maintenance manual there as well? I'm gonna do a search regardless.

The bipod I have has sewn in leather feet. Are there any markings to distinguish it from being USGI or China built? Would the bayonet be USGI as well? Its pretty damned long with a hard plastic snap in sheath.

I do have yet another question. You mentioned the "crown" of the barrel. What is that?

The reason I ask is because along with this rifle, I inherited what I just got identified as a Springfield 1903 bolt action rifle(this thing is very heavy). I don't know much about this rifle either, but I do remember about 14 years ago, my father had it sent in to have the barrel replaced, and mentioned that it needed to be re-crowned. I don't know what that means.

I apologize for my ignorance, but I am still in the learning process about these older rifles.
 

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dokter: Here's a pic of my USGI M2 bipod:


click the pic for a higher resolution image...

More pics can be found here.

Mine is well used and seems to have been armory rebuilt with new legs and a new clamp.

Things to look for on a USGI bipod are the correct markings, the yellow DAS stamp and copper braising instead of welding on the joints. If it's in new condition, you should see a blue "M" stamped on the underside of the feet and also perhaps on the side of the clamp.

I've seen these bipods with rubber dipped feet before but not leather coverings.
 

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Sweet inheritence! Baby that baby, OK? It's a true collector's item - only clean it with a coated rod and muzzle guide - you lock the bolt back, slide the rod down the barrel through the muzzle guide with NO attachment until it's visible at the breech, thread the brush or patch holder onto the rod through the open bolt then PULL the brush or patch back through the barrel in the same direction that the bullet travels. Or save a bunch of hassle and order the Otis 750 Tactical Cleaning Kit for about $45 - your sweet Devine deserves it!

BTW - Mr. Elmer Balance, the man who invented the M1A and built them in Devine, TX prior to Springfield Armory, Inc. taking over and moving to Illinois, is still alive and kicking down there in Tejas. In fact, he's got a bunch of M14 parts for sale and I bet he'd love to hear from you about your rifle. You will likely be amazed by some of the stories he can tell you. 830-663-5105

Also, how about some info on the '03 Springfield? Sounds like your old man knew his shooting irons. Honor him by caring for them well enough to pass them along to the next generation.

flcracker
 

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Sir,

The crown as you mentioned is the very end of the barrel--it is the nicely rolled edge that makes up the end of the barrel. This is one of the most vital parts to accuaracy--the crown is the last thing that touches the bullet before it makes its flight, any knicks or gouges will affect its accuracy.

The 1903 you mentioned is also a collectors item. Your dad may have had the barrel re crowned due to excessive shooting----called Muzzle wear---or the crown may have been damaged and needed to be recrowned.

No pardon for ignorance needed this is why sites like this are around for the better learning of all. Keep the questions coming.

Yes fulton sells maintenance books--the best it the guide to the M14 rifle written by Duff---excellent bible for the M14.

Oh one more thing---we here at the firing line love pictures --or gun candy/porn if you get a chance post some pics of your beauty we would love to see her--if you have trouble posting pics someone here would be more than willing to help.

Take Care--and as said pump the questions man!

--800
 
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