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Discussion Starter #1
Who made the HRL marked bolts for Harrington and Richardson, And are they safe to use?
 

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I've never seen a HRL marked M14 bolt. There are some things about the bolt markings that make me wonder.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Anything in particular that stands out?
Are you thinking it could be fake?
I hope I didnt throw away 250 bucks.
 

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I never heard of it, and never saw one. The markings look different than the HRT, which was a different sub contractor.

I also see the slight Pr!ck Punch marking, which shows the High Pressure Proof round was tested.
 

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Anything in particular that stands out?
Are you thinking it could be fake?
The "HRL" marking is mentioned in the April 1963 Gun World article M14: Boon or Blunder? by Jack Lewis. In that article, Mr. Lewis was referring to defective Harrington & Richardson bolts being pulled out of the U. S. Marine Corps supply system by the end of 1962. The defective Harrington & Richardsion bolts were marked HRT and made by Textile Machine Works. IMO, "HRL" is a typographical error in the April 1963 Gun World article. Other than Stevens' citing the April 1963 magazine article in his book, I'm not aware of the "HRL" marking being mentioned in any literature on the M14.

Every USGI M14 bolt I've ever seen has well spaced markings. The steel supplier identifier on this HRL bolt, A27, is not evenly spaced with the top two lines. Also, the steel supplier codes on Harrington & Richardson bolts used letters, e.g., ACR and CDR. The "A" in A27 is not fully struck, unusual for something that would have been stamped by machine. I may be incorrect but the A27 marking doesn't conform to HRT bolt markings.

It seems odd that an unknown bolt manufacturer shows up forty years after the last M14 bolts were produced.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Is there any other way to identify this bolt, say machine marks, or by measurement. It kind of baffles me that someone would take the time to put incorrect markings on a bolt they were trying to pass off as real.
 

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Is there any other way to identify this bolt, say machine marks, or by measurement. It kind of baffles me that someone would take the time to put incorrect markings on a bolt they were trying to pass off as real.
The only thing I can suggest is that You take it to a Machine Shop and have them check the Hardness on the "C" Scale, to make sure that it is not a Marked Up $ 20 Chinese Bolt!GI3
PS If the Hardness reads in the mid or lower 40s You have a Chinese Bolt, a GI bolt should read in the 50s or even low 60s!
 

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The only thing I can suggest is that You take it to a Machine Shop and have them check the Hardness on the "C" Scale, to make sure that it is not a Marked Up $ 20 Chinese Bolt!GI3
PS If the Hardness reads in the mid or lower 40s You have a Chinese Bolt, a GI bolt should read in the 50s or even low 60s!
There is another possible explanation but I'll refrain from disclosing it here, for valid reasons.
 

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Here's another one-Auction arms auction 10089058. Glad I read this thread,was going to bid on rifle, but now going to pass. If Different and Bill NEVER saw one it just aint right.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thats funny, we go from never seeing one to seeing two in less then a month. I wonder what the story is behind them.
 

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Thats funny, we go from never seeing one to seeing two in less then a month. I wonder what the story is behind them.
Could it be that someone is trying to make some Easy Christmas Money?
You would be surprised how many Amateur M14 Parts Entrepreneurs are out there and what Length they go to to make a Buck from the Uninformed, most of the time it is with Magazines, Bolts and Oprods!ICONWINK
My suggestion is that one should buy Here in Our PX, that way You know who You are dealing with and have a recourse if You get taken advantage of!
 

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Here's another one-Auction arms auction 10089058. Glad I read this thread,was going to bid on rifle, but now going to pass. If Different and Bill NEVER saw one it just aint right.
The markings on the bolt in the rifle in Auction Arms ad # 10089058 has a different font than the HRL A27 bolt. Hmmm.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Here's another one-Auction arms auction 10089058. Glad I read this thread,was going to bid on rifle, but now going to pass. If Different and Bill NEVER saw one it just aint right.
I wonder if the bolt is original to the rifle, or added by a previous owner?
 

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One would have to do some checking, in person, to be sure. I just want to state what I saw about 12-15 years ago.

I was at a show and walking around I saw a dealer with 3 M1D Sniper Barrels. They were scarce and he was asking a small fortune. When I inspected one, I saw several issues.

The markings of the drawing number was correct, but the M1D barrel in that time period did not have grooves to lock the rear hand guard spring clip. The M1D rear hand guard is smaller and is locked differently. These had those grooves, making me suspect they were standard barrels that had been altered to triple the price.

I started to look over the entire barrel and I could not see any indication of a change from the standard barrel drawing number to the M1D drawing number. But while I looked at the gas port, I noticed the chrome had wear lines underneath, like it was recently re-chromed from slight use. That was obvious, as I had many slightly used barrels over the years.

I asked a technical guy and he told me with the current technology one can deposit metal into the old markings and remark over them, which would make it almost impossible for most eyes. There is a variety of test that can bring up the old markings, but you will never find those items at a gun show.

I came to the conclusion that all three were made up from standard barrels, with slight use. He got a small fortune from those who did not know what to look for.

Anything is possible today.
 

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If you are referring to the M14 Op Rods, the maker has developed an excuse. The CAGE number belongs to a Spring Company in Connecticut.

The number on the op rod stands for Red, White and Blue, the name of his company. I have seen them advertised as "Military Contract" several times by guys who have them.
 
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