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How to kick a** with M14 irons sights (and grade 4 math)

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I thought I would post this because I don't see very many M14's around that aren't scoped. It and the M1 have the greatest irons ever put on a rifle!!

* EDIT* Old guys, I know you cant see anymore did not mean to pick on you.

I know not everybody has been in the service or really had the instruction to become lethal with irons so here it is. Get yourself a nice Garand rear sight and have at er.

This is the base formula for these standard issue rifle sights (M14/Garand).
1 click changes the impact of the bullet approx 1" @ 100m/y
M14 sight is graduated in meters M1 sight in yards.

Elevation adjustment range: 0-72 clicks
Windage adjustment range: 16 clicks L or R of center index.

With your rear sight windage index lined up in the center, adjust your front sight side to side until you are shooting exactly center line. This is best done at 25m from a rest at a piece of 1" wide vertical tape.

For Bullseye zero: Zero @ 100m (usually 6-8 clicks up from bottom).
Elevation: Once you are in the bull @ 100m with a 6 o'clock hold, dial the elevation all the way down while carefully counting the number of clicks. REMEMBER THIS NUMBER IT IS YOUR ZERO! Dial the elevation back up, again counting the clicks. Now loosen your elev knob pinion screw while firmly holding the aperture in place and set the dial to the 100m mark. Tighten the screw and fire on target to confirm zero. All of your sight adjustments will now work off this specific number of clicks which is your zero. Remember that every rifle will be slightly different.

Hungry here: I like to tighten the (single hand tight , not 2 hands...) elevation pinion screw, then bottom out your aperture, tighten up more. Crank up your aperture all the way to the top, then tighten up AGAIN!

For battle zero: Zero @ 250m (usually 12-13 clicks up from bottom)
Then shoot point of aim. Allows for engagement of man sized targets from 0-400m by aiming center mass. This is of course not for precision shooting.



Using the sight working off your bullseye zero.
Range 200: 1 click = 2"
Range 300: 1 click = 3"
Range 400: 1 click = 4"
Range 500: 1 click = 5"
Range 600: 1 click = 6"
and so on.

M14 issue rifle 22" barrel 26" sight radius.

Range 200: Your shot hits 8" low. Raise elevation 4 clicks, fire.
Range 500: Your shot hits 15" low. Raise elevation 3 clicks, fire.
Range 600: Your shot hits a foot high. Lower elevation 2 clicks, fire.
Range 300: Your shot hits 9" high. Do the math Fire!

You always round up your clicks. Range 400: Your shot hits 10" high. You will lower elevation 3 clicks not 2.

Once you've mastered the grade 4 math calculations you can hit the range.
Target 500m. You turn your elevation knob to the 500m mark to engage a target at that distance and fire a spotting round.
Your spotter tells you it missed, 20" low, correction 4 clicks elevation, fire.
Once you become one with your rifle you will know the number of comeups (clicks) from zero required to make hits at certain distances. You can put them on a small laminated card and tape it to the stock. As long as you have that info you can simply estimate range, dial in and actually make a first round hit on target with that particular rifle.
Example: Target 400m, +16, fire.

Always reset your rifle back to its zero (and the windage back to center) when finished. If you cant remember write it on your rifle stock. Once you get good at this you will be able to make hits at varying distances very quickly.

Hungry here: At 100yds/meters, use every attempt to mechanically center your rear sight base with respect to the vernier scale (I like Whiteout or model paint) that is easier to read. Then zero for windage by (allen key to loosen) tweaking the front sight in the opposite direction you want the MPI or bullet strike to move into. This is for very serious competition or for you perfection addicts! LOL

Windage knob Corrections
Formula is the same: 1 click L or R @ 100m shifts bullet impact approx 1"
@200m - 1 click = 2"
@300m - 1 click = 3"
and so on.

Correcting for Wind G.I. formula

Range X Windspeed divided by 10 = Number of clicks.

Winds coming from 12 and 6 o'clock have little effect. No correction.
Winds coming from 1,5,7,11 o' clock have a slight effect. Half correction.
Winds coming from 2,3,4, and 8,9,10 o'clock have greatest effect. Full correction.

Range 500:
Wind: 6 mph
Direction: 9 o'clock

5X6 = 30 div 10 = 3

Answer: 3 clicks, full correction, left windage

If it was a 1 o'clock wind it would be a half correction (1.5 clicks) On a standard GI sight that wont go so remember, round up your clicks.
It would be 2 clicks, right windage.

Test
Range 400, 5 o'clock wind 18mph. Your first shot is a foot low and to the left of the target. How would you adjust your sights to try to make a hit with the next shot?


National match sights
They are 1/2 MOA per click GI are 1 MOA per click. Just X everything by 2.

Hungry if I missed anything please add it.

Hungry here: Pretty darn good, I must say. I'm still looking!
 

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good intel. Thanks for posting it, Seven6Two!
 

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I just saved your post as a word document and with some editing I will print it, laminate and put in my range bag. Thanks
 

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just tried some model paint a few weeks ago
A good & cheap way to color or white the numbers is to use a China marker and some CLP solvent. Put the CLP solvent (just enough) on the numbers and scribble in the wax from the white China Marker. This way works the best for deep and exact stampings.
 

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That's the most useful plain English explanation of how to zero and set the sights on a M1 or M14 type rifle I've seen in a long time.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
like i said i copied this post from a guy named j669 on a canadian website called canadiangunnutz.com i asked him permission to repost this thread here and he was cool with the idea. so the credit is his.
 

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A sticky would not be advisable until some erroneous information is corrected, in my opinion. Particularly, the wind dope info is wrong. The range constant is incorrect, which divides into the wind speed and distance formula to find corrections in clicks of windage.

Here is the correct info:

UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS
Marine Corps Recruit Depot/Eastern Recruiting Region
P.O. Box 19001
Parris Island, South Carolina 29905-9001


STUDENT OUTLINE


EFFECTS OF WEATHER

0300-M16-1010

1111

RECRUIT TRAINING

M068083

REVISED 02/21/2008


(1) Range X Wind Velocity in mph = Clicks for full
Range Constant value wind

(2) The range constant will depend on the type of ammunition. The range constant for M855 ammunition is as follows:

(a) If the range to the target is 200-400 yards, the range constant is 5.

(b) If the range to the target is 500-700 yards, the range constant is 4.

(3) The range that the formula uses is measured in 100-yard increments. At a range of 300 yards to the target, a 3 would be entered for the range in the formula.

(4) In adjusting the windage on the rifle, the rear sight aperture must always be moved in the direction from which the wind is blowing. For example, if the wind is blowing from the right, the rear sight aperture must be moved right.

5) A working example of this formula is:

(a) A 10 mph wind is blowing from 9 o'clock. The
range to the target is 500 yards. Therefore, Range
(R)=5, Velocity (V)=10 mph, 500-yard Range
Constant=4.

R X V = 5 X 10 = 50 = 12.5 or 13 clicks left
4

In the above example, you will see the range constant is not 10, but 4. Given that this is for the M855.

For all you .308 shooters here's the formula:

Range X Wind Velocity
Range Constant = Minutes of full value wind

The range Constants for M118 are:

100-500 yds - 15
600 yds - 14
700-800 yds - 13
900 yds - 12
1000 yds - 11

The key here is the full value part. The answer you get will only be accurate if the crosswind is perpendicular to the shooter/target line. In other words, from 3:00 o'clock or from 9:00 o'clock. If it's not, you'll have to account for this when determining the correct amount of windage to use. For instance, half value would be half the number of clicks and quarter would be 1/4 the number of clicks, and so on.
 
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