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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an older Smith Enterprise M14 match rifle. It has a heavy fiber glass stock that I think is a McMillan but I am not sure. Can anyone help me identify the manufacture? This past weekend I was shooting it and dropped the rifle and took a chip out of the stock. I am looking for recommendations on places to send it to be repaired.
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It certainly looks like a smear (or semi-smear) McMillan. They no longer make this pattern of stock, but they may be able to do some repairs to an existing one. I'd go ahead and contact them. They have always been very helpful to me whenever I had a question.
 

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Call Lynn at McMillan and offer to send those 2 pics. It’s a pre-1988 era smear stock and definitely worth a proper repair. They have one old-timer “gunsmith/stock smith” who does custom work, and he would be the right person to repair it. Don’t expect a quick turn around time as he does their custom work, but again it’s worthy of professional repair, as it’s a desirable stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for your help. I will contact McMillan about making a repair. It would be great if the repair can be done in a way that does not require painting the stock.
 

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Sure, good luck with the repair. BTW, the colors are not painted, but actually molded-into the gel coat. I presume they will apply new gel coat on just the damaged area once repaired, but it’s a bit of a tedious art project...
 

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What you have is the first issue McMillan M1A stock. It was a Marine Corps style stock. These typically have the circular indents to simulate the liner screw positions and the stocks have a short grip that was later changed to a longer style. Your pictures don't show if it is inletted for the selector parts. If it is the stock could be an original USMC issue. McMillan has made several changes to the mold for their M14 competition stock over the years. The latest one has an issue with the recess below the bolt lock. Nothing super serious, but improperly done.
 

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What you have is the first issue McMillan M1A stock. It was a Marine Corps style stock. These typically have the circular indents to simulate the liner screw positions and the stocks have a short grip that was later changed to a longer style. Your pictures don't show if it is inletted for the selector parts. If it is the stock could be an original USMC issue. McMillan has made several changes to the mold for their M14 competition stock over the years. The latest one has an issue with the recess below the bolt lock. Nothing super serious, but improperly done.
Ted,
Are you referring to the EXTERIOR scallop or recess just below the bolt lock?

Danny

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I think that repair is the least of your worries. That can simply be repaired by filling with something like Marine Tex. That will show, and so will pretty much any repair. You are almost guaranteed to have to look at this as a refinishing/painting project. Pretty much any auto body man could spray a fantastic finish on it. I am not a big believer of using spray can paint on most things. You could do it yourself, but I strongly suggest going to an autobody paint store and having them supply a paint in your choice of colors which would typically need to use reducer and hardener. Usually, this requires a compressor and a gun, but you can get a spray kit that has a detachable jar and self contained propellant canister. It is called a "Preval" sprayer. Far superior finish results and dutability over any ready to go spray can paint. Very close results to a spray finish applied with a gun and compressor. As mentioned, as the original color is molded in, so I do not think that McMillan can offer you a repair in just that spot that will look like it wasn't repaired, and they might also suggest/offer complete repainting after repairing, but I think that they are a must for a first stop consultation to see what options there are. Let us know what they say and where you go with this.

Danny

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It looks like this is not a Marine Corps stock because it is not inletted for the selector. I want to be sure that the stock is repaired without being painted. I am hopeful that McMillan will be able to restore the stock. This tread has helped me realize the value of this stock and I want to be sure it is not damaged more when it is repaired.

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I think that repair is the least of your worries. That can simply be repaired by filling with something like Marine Tex. That will show, and so will pretty much any repair. You are almost guaranteed to have to look at this as a refinishing/painting project. Pretty much any auto body man could spray a fantastic finish on it. I am not a big believer of using spray can paint on most things. You could do it yourself, but I strongly suggest going to an autobody paint store and having them supply a paint in your choice of colors which would typically need to use reducer and hardener. Usually, this requires a compressor and a gun, but you can get a spray kit that has a detachable jar and self contained propellant canister. It is called a "Preval" sprayer. Far superior finish results and dutability over any ready to go spray can paint. Very close results to a spray finish applied with a gun and compressor. As mentioned, as the original color is molded in, so I do not think that McMillan can offer you a repair in just that spot that will look like it wasn't repaired, and they might also suggest/offer complete repainting after repairing, but I think that they are a must for a first stop consultation to see what options there are. Let us know what they say and where you go with this.

Danny

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If you knew it wasn't painted then why did ya ramble on about doing it in automotive spray paint?
 

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If you knew it wasn't painted then why did ya ramble on about doing it in automotive spray paint?
Because it might not be able to be repaired satisfactorily without being painted over. If you had read my posting, you wouldn't have to be asking.

Danny

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That will show, and so will pretty much any repair. You are almost guaranteed to have to look at this as a refinishing/painting project.
I dunno, I re-read your post a second time and it still sounds like you advocate painting it. Since some of us know what's up with that stock, it sounded like a "left-field" suggestion.

McMillan will repair it and dab a little colored Gelcoat to cover the fix.
 

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This thread has helped me realize the value of this stock and I want to be sure it is not damaged more when it is repaired.
In all honesty, it's not a structural/functional issue but just a "door ding" on your pick-up. If your rifle experiences honest use, it happens and will happen again. My 15-year-old Mac has quite a few dings and I just carry on.
 

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That repair would essentially be the same as a fiberglass boat hull repair with applied gelcoat finish / color match. The most difficult part would be the color match.
I have done numerous hull repairs on boats and the end result is almost invisible except for a slightly different color hue in the gelcoat on a few of them.

There are literally 100's of you tube videos showing how it's done.

Not that difficult and all the materials needed are available at most marine suppliers, such as West Marine or the like..
 

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That repair would essentially be the same as a fiberglass boat hull repair with applied gelcoat finish / color match. The most difficult part would be the color match.
That is correct. Both Forceman and I have sent several stocks to McMillan over the years for repairs or modifications. As noted in my earlier post, McMillan uses gel-coat to repair their fiberglass stocks - they do not paint these repairs. Here are pics from another thread re filling the M14 buttplate inlet for a Pachmyar buttpad for XM25 replicas. This bedding material can be spot painted with an airbrush as done by M1Army, but what McMillan did on my project stock was apply the dark green gel coat in this same area to match the rest of the stock. McMillan will use a similar method to repair that ding in MGOOD's old stock.
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The only minor/trivial issue with the original poster's specific repair area is that McMillan discontinued the light green color about 20 years ago, and thus they will use dark green and brown gel-coat to color match the repaired area, so it may lose a tiny bit of the light green in that one area of the camouflage pattern - but their long time gunsmith/stock smith is quite good and when he is done, it will hardly be noticeable aside from a very close examination.
Crazynoto's nice gelcoat/McMillan fiberglass stock repair kit
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Gel-coat color matching for repaired area is the challenge (note “new” dark green vs “old” dark green):
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If the mcmillan route doesn't work out I can do it if you don't mind waiting until the end of summer to send it to me, do you have the piece that chipped out? If you have a chunk that broke out? it with be easier to epoxy it back in then fill / blend / color match the remainder. The two stocks on the right were color matched gel coat repaired / filled where the butt plate hinge used to be.
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