M14 Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello,

Just got my m1a Scout and I love it. Unfortunately, when I tried to adjust the front sight, I found the screw to be frozen. I read other threads and put some liquid wrench on there. Of course, by now the head is pretty well stripped. Am I pretty much screwed at this point or is there an easy fix to this? Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
528 Posts
I would try Kroil overnight. Then an appropriately sized easy out.

I would resign myself to the prospect of buying another sight and screw. What you don't want to do is damage anything else in the process. The front sight is about $40.

If the easy out does not work, think about drilling from the front. Depending on the length of your muzzle device, you may have to buy longer drill bits. The good news is that a right hand bit will be in the direction you need if you drill from the front.

The other option is to cut from the top. Right down the middle so that when you get through the screw, the two halves come apart.

Then you can buy the tritium front sight that you know you always wanted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
933 Posts
Acetone for the LocTite and and Easy-Out for the Set-Screw
If and Easy-Out doesn't work, and since the screw is done;
Get an Allen Wrench that will fit and you're willing to (either) lose or cut, then JB-Weld it into the Set-Screw (careful not to get the JB-Weld in the Threads), and leave set-up for 24 hours
That'll get your Screw out
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,679 Posts
I keep several torx screws in U.S. and metric sizes to deal with this problem when penetrants and non-mechanical (heat/cold) solutions fail. I assume you have a new SAI rifle, correct? SAI has the true 800 lb gorilla working on its assembly line with wrenches. If you have to go torx to Allen, use the torx size that fits snuggest and you can probably save the Allen screw if you haven't already rounded it with an Allen wrench trying to get it loose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Remove the flash hider so that you can work on the stuck bolt apart from the barrel & rest of the rifle. You will have to get a castle nut plier, a GOOD 1/16" allen wrench for the castle nut set screw, and a gas cylinder wrench to keep from torqueing on the barrel/gas cylinder assembly while loosening and retightening the castle nut.
Once the flash hider/sight assembly is in hand put the side of the sight opposite the battered/stuck screw against a solid surface-anvil, using a drift no larger in diameter that the head of the offending screw (while backing up the sight assembly) and hammer on the drift with a ball peen hammer a half dozen times (or more).
This will do two things for you. The bolt will receive enough "shock" to allow loosening without undue force, and the wallowed out socket head will peen closed a bit to tighten it back up to the (new/good/quality) wrench.
It MUST be backed up against a solid surface(anvil) to do ANY good though.
It wouldn't hurt to use an inpact driver to help in removing that screw also.

I know it sounds expensive, getting the few rifle-specific tools to remove the sight block/flash hider from the barrel, but it will serve you well in the future in working on your firearm, AND it removes any chance of further damaging the gun with errant tool marks.hammer blows, ect.
17 years of repairing motorcycles provided MUCH experience getting stuck and/or ruined fasteners from machinery with as little collateral damage as possible.
 

·
Registered
79 IHC Scout II, 74 VW Bug class 11 look a like
Joined
·
7,424 Posts
When I have to remove a buggered up Allen screw under 1/4" I find a Allen bit for a screw driver that is slightly bigger and tap it in with a small hammer,some times I will grind a champher on it so it will drive in easier. I use a 1/4" wrench to turn it so it's more controllable, some times I will use a heat gun to heat it.

Casey
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top