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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Am in the market for a mil-dot scope for a Rem 700. As I more than likely won't be shooting this at less than 200 yds, and more likely at 500+ yds, I am looking at fixed magnification scopes. Like with camera lenses, primes are generally the way to go: Better glass and less moving parts to cause problems. Am thinking a 10X should do the trick, but could go a bit bigger. Was looking at this [ame="http://www.amazon.com/Bushnell-Tactical-Mil-Dot-Reticle-Riflescope/dp/B004NKY6DU"]Bushnell[/ame], but don't know much about it. Also, it does seem to be a bit on the "cheaper" side, but then again I'm not looking to dump $1K+ at this time on glass.

Any suggestions?
 

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I have to say that when I was in the same situation I went with an SWFA SS fixed 10x and really like it alot. Is it perfect? No, but pretty darn good. You can buy them new for $299 or used for around $200-$250. They are built very well, have a lot of elevation adjustment and have really decent glass.

http://swfa.com/SWFA-SS-10x42-Tactical-30mm-Riflescope-P499.aspx
 

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I bought the 10x42 SS Scope w/Mil Quad reticule and am very happy with it. The glass is very sharp and clear...but then I haven't looked through a $3K Schmidt & Bender or US Optics scope.
 
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I have a Bushnell Elite Tactical LRS 10x40 mil dot, (ET1040). I like it, and I got it new for less than $200. I am pretty sure that's the same one your asking about, but I think they must have just raised the price at Amazon. I was looking to buy another one, about a month ago and they had at, I think $191, and I was hoping for a price drop, not an increase.

Price for quality, I think great scope
 

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What is the difference between that bushnell and the long range ffp?

As far as the glass?

The Bushnell elite tactical ffp lrhs 6-21 is a well liked scope in the long range community. I know you not shooting long range but if the glass is of the same quality then it may be great.
I know two people who sold off their scopes for that bushnell elite long range lrhs. One of them sold a mark4 in favor if the bushnell. Maybe for the reticle?

The swfa 10x is well reviewed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I've read good things about the Bushnell Elite Tactical LRS 10x40 mil dot (and yes, that's the one I linked to earlier). However, the10x42 SWFA looks good too.

Hmmm... if I want to push this past 1000, would a 16X be a wiser decision?
 

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I have used the Bushnell 10x scope in the past and for the money it is a pretty good option. Another thought would be to look at the used market for a Leupold Mk4 in 10x. Leupolds have a lifetime warranty regardless who purchased it.
As far as distance the 10x will work out great. I run a fixed 10x on my SuperMatch and have shot it out to 800yds and didn't feel I needed more.
 

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Swfa ss 10x mil/mil I shot out to 1000yrds with it and I didn't feel like I was being held back. Tough as nails and will hold its zero, and it has tons of adjustment. If you can find a used hd version even better they have some really nice glass for the money.
 

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With advances in modern tech and glass, there is no reason to NOT go to a variable powered scope. If the Scout/Snipers of the United States Marine Corps are using variables, I believe it is more than rugged and reliable enough for your use.

If you decide to stick with a fixed power scope in your price range, the SWFA SS will work. Very solid, reliable scope. The glass is very good for the money spent. You will find that if you try to shoot very early in the morning, or late in the evening, or on days of heavy cloud cover, you will not be able to engage targets as far away, or see as much detail, as several more expensive scope brands.

It's not hard to find a used Leupold Mk4 or Mk4 M3 used in your price range, as well as fixed 10x scopes from IOR Valdada. If you decide to stay with a fixed scope, the 10x IOR is a tank, plus is has glass from Carl Zeiss Schottwerks, some of the absolute best in the business. I would take the IOR over the Leupold, but the fixed power Leupolds are good scopes.

If you decide to go variable, the Sightron SIII and the Vortex Viper PST scopes are within your price range. The Sightron has slightly better glass than the VVPST, and one of the best erector systems in the business, but I like the knobs and reticles of the VVPST better. Check them both out and make up your own mind.......you can't go wrong with either.
 

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Am in the market for a mil-dot scope for a Rem 700. As I more than likely won't be shooting this at less than 200 yds, and more likely at 500+ yds, I am looking at fixed magnification scopes. Like with camera lenses, primes are generally the way to go: Better glass and less moving parts to cause problems. Am thinking a 10X should do the trick, but could go a bit bigger. Was looking at this Bushnell, but don't know much about it. Also, it does seem to be a bit on the "cheaper" side, but then again I'm not looking to dump $1K+ at this time on glass.

Any suggestions?
Is this a purely target rifle? If so I'd spend a bit more and get something like a sightron variable in 6.5-20 power. They have a mildot, .1mil click target knobs model that is 650-700 bucks I think.

If you want to be cheap the SWFA 10X is fine. The glass and build quality aren't as good as the sightron but it is reliable.

The scope I am thinking of buying for my 'long range' target rifle is the bushnell HDMR. You can find them used with the GAP christmas tree reticule for 1000 bucks. It's the best tactical/target scope you can buy for that price.
 

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I own (2) SWFA scopes. The fixed 10x mil quad & the 3-15x mil quad and that particular reticle is very handy. The fixed isn't bad at all. The side focus on mine are real easy to adjust without drastically changing the cheek weld. The glass on the 3-15x seems a bit better than the 10x but so is the price. Ironically, the variable is also a tad smaller in length and bell diameters.

Highly recommend either....
 

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Read Planoguys post "hindered by a scope." Then get a Leupold. I have spent time experimenting with the SWFA 10X. It's OK for the money but it's not going to satisfy me in the long run. I also think you are underestimating the value of variables. The military is using them on sniper rifles and on things as tough as the Barrett 50's and .338 Lapua's. The Leupold 3.5-10's and the 4.5-14's are exceptional. They are both available as mark 4's with mil dots. There are more advanced reticles available from Leupold now also.

One nice thing about Leupolds is they are guarranteed to work to anyone to owns them whether he bought them new or not, for life. They will fix it free if anything goes wrong and they are here in the USA, not in Japan or Taiwan. Bushnell's and SWFA are both off shore items. There was a time Bushnell was made in the USA....40 years ago. SWFA has always been made off shore. I'm not a fanatic about "made in America" but it helps if something goes wrong.
 

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What is a mil dot scope?

To answer that, we first have to know what a mil is.

A mil dot reticle does not refer to the military. The MIL in mil dot is a shortening of the term milliradian. You are familiar with degrees as measurements of angle. You also know from high school geometry that there are 360 degrees in a circle. As the circle grows larger in circumference, the number of degrees does not change, but the distance between each degree along the circle does increase. You may also know that degrees are divided into smaller units called minutes. There are seconds, too, but they are too small for this discussion. A degree is divided into 60 minutes. At 100 yards distance, the angle of one minute is approximately one inch. So if the centers of the two bullets farthest apart in a 100-yard group are about one inch apart, we call that a minute-of-angle group. Get it? At 200 yards, a group measuring two inches center- to-center equals a one minute-of-angle group. At 400 yards, it's a four-inch group. At 50 yards, it's a half-inch group.

Now what is a mil?
One mil of angle is approximately 3.6 inches long at 100 yards, and that is close enough to 3.5 minutes of angle to be convenient. In Leapers mil dot scopes, the centers of the dots are one mil apart. If the scope is variable power, this only holds true for the highest power setting.

So, if your bullseye is 3.5 inches in diameter and 100 yards away, it will touch the centers of any two dots next to each other. If it appears only half that size through the scope (from the center of one dot to half the distance to the next center) your target must be about 200 yards away. If the same bullseye spans the distance between the centers of three dots (two with an extra dot between them), your target is about 50 yards away.

Sniper rifles have mil dots on both horizontal and vertical crosshairs so they can measure height as well as width through their scopes. A six-foot tall man is also 72 inches tall. At 100 yards, he would appear to be just over 20 mils tall. At 1000 yards, he would be close to 2 mils tall.

Military binoculars and gunsights are usually equipped with mil reticles. On the standard crosshairs are other short lines that mark mill angles. These are often referred to as rangefinding reticles. To use them that way, you have to know how to apply the correct mathematical formula, plus you have to know the approximate size of your target.

What else can you use the mil dot reticle for? Well, if you are shooting in a crosswind, you can use the dots as additional aim points to compensate for wind drift. If you notice the strike of your pellets in relation to the dots, you can aim off to one side by placing a dot along the horizontal reticle over the target instead of the crosshairs. By choosing the correct dot, you can easily adjust for how much the pellet will drift in the wind and end up with a perfect shot every time. Better still, there is no math involved!
 

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Oh man, not again.
 
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