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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

I've been considering glass bedding my M1A that is currently sitting in a standard walnut stock from Springfield. I decided to let a gunsmith do it for me so I call one up and ask him for a quote on glass bedding. He asked if my stock had a metal liner in it. I was not sure what that was, so I described the piece of metal that surrounds the mag well and seems to retain the lugs that come down from the receiver to the smith. He confirmed that's what he was asking about and said I should not glass bed as that would yield no improvement.

So my question is: why?

I guess there were some things he assumed or maybe I didn't describe enough about my rifle to him. But, for the record, my M1A was a Standard model from Springfield that only had the barrel changed to a medium weight one and had some parts of the stock that was contacting the gas system/op rod removed.

Thanks!
 

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I wouldn't normally say anything, but he is wrong. All military NM rifles bedded in standard stocks included the steel liner. Oversized match stocks didn't include the liner as it was not necessary in heavy stocks. The liners are bedded along with the receiver, however they should be carefully fitted to the receiver first. Bedding an M14 is much more complicated than bedding a bolt gun. Many gunsmiths simply don't like to work on military rifles.
 

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Armorers have been bedding M14's with stock liners since 1963. Here is an original description, where the liner is bedded to the stock, then bedding pads are added to support the rifle and trigger assembly.

Font Publication Watercraft Book Newspaper
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Font Line Parallel Art Illustration
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Fast forward 30 some odd years. Below pictures are off a stock that was bedded by Glen Nelson, to include the liner...

Wood Hardwood Varnish Flooring Wood stain
Product Rectangle Wood Table Flooring

Wood Musical instrument Rectangle Flooring Wood stain
Plant Tire Wood Rectangle Flooring
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I wouldn't normally say anything, but he is wrong.
I do not know enough to say that he is wrong, but I was certainly taken aback a little to hear him tell me that I should not try bedding it.

Many gunsmiths simply don't like to work on military rifles.
That's funny. Because this particular smith, I would assume, works primarily with M14 styled rifles. Not going to name drop anyone, so I will just say they are located in Tempe, Arizona.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Armorers have been bedding M14's with stock liners since 1963. Here is an original description, where the liner is bedded to the stock, then bedding pads are added to support the rifle and trigger assembly.
Cool read! Thanks for sharing this vintage magazine.
 

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Hi guys,

I've been considering glass bedding my M1A that is currently sitting in a standard walnut stock from Springfield. I decided to let a gunsmith do it for me so I call one up and ask him for a quote on glass bedding. He asked if my stock had a metal liner in it. I was not sure what that was, so I described the piece of metal that surrounds the mag well and seems to retain the lugs that come down from the receiver to the smith. He confirmed that's what he was asking about and said I should not glass bed as that would yield no improvement.

So my question is: why?

I guess there were some things he assumed or maybe I didn't describe enough about my rifle to him. But, for the record, my M1A was a Standard model from Springfield that only had the barrel changed to a medium weight one and had some parts of the stock that was contacting the gas system/op rod removed.

Thanks!
Simple. He didn't want to do it.
 

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All military NM rifles bedded in standard stocks included the steel liner. The liners are bedded along with the receiver, however they should be carefully fitted to the receiver first.
Here’s the thing, it seems the current method trims 1/8 to 3/16” off of the liner to allow bedding compound in place of fitting as a short cut. I believe you have stated in the past that it is not as sturdy as full thickness bedding.
 

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Cutting material out of the liner was a military expedient. The problem is that the bedding compound filling the gaps breaks down within about 1200 rounds. It is far better to fit the liner to the receiver so there is full contact between the liner and receiver legs before bedding. Bedding will last three to four times longer done this way.
 

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That sounds like a Brookfield liner thinking to me!
 
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