M14 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1


So today my brand new M1A loaded arrived. And I already had a troy chassis ready to go for it. Disassembly went well, until the gas plug. I tried heating it with a propane torch, using the tool to hold the gas system wile I used a 6 point socket, but in the end it has 100% stripped.

What the hell do I do now? I obviously can't send the gun to Springfield as it's in Canada.

I just spent 4500 on the rifle, a chassis, and optics, I really would like to use them and not have a useless pile of stuff.

Thanks...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
236 Posts
You will have to get a new gas plug, springfield should send you a replacement for that one. Not sure what the rules are as far as getting rifle parts across the boarder but the best thing to do is send SAI an email with the picture. As far as getting this one off, put a few rounds through it to help loosen things up. When I got mine it didnt want to budge, a hundred rounds later it came off with some effort. You could try using some vice grips to get it off. Im sure more experienced guys will chime in here shortly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
You will have to get a new gas plug, springfield should send you a replacement for that one. Not sure what the rules are as far as getting rifle parts across the boarder but the best thing to do is send SAI an email with the picture. As far as getting this one off, put a few rounds through it to help loosen things up. When I got mine it didnt want to budge, a hundred rounds later it came off with some effort. You could try using some vice grips to get it off. Im sure more experienced guys will chime in here shortly.
Already ordered a new one, only one I could find in Canada was a SOCOM cap, but it should work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
sorry man, I busted a cheap wrench trying to get mine off. Once I got it off I realized that it had stripped threads, I was able to send it to springfield and they fixed it and did some other maintenance for free. My family comes from Canada so I can say "sorry"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
sorry man, I busted a cheap wrench trying to get mine off. Once I got it off I realized that it had stripped threads, I was able to send it to springfield and they fixed it and did some other maintenance for free. My family comes from Canada so I can say "sorry"
I hope mine isn't toast...

Ok so it is turning counter clockwise, if looking down on the plug right? I haven't been invariantly tightening it?

Getting my gun back to Springfield would be very tricky.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
I'd be more worried about the gas cylinder. Check out the threads on it and make sure they are good to go so a new plug will address any issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,198 Posts
Also get the proper wrench for working on this, I have seen way to many damage their rifles without the proper tools, Sadlak is a excellent source.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,214 Posts
Regardless of what caused your problem you now have a problem. You sound determined to fix it yourself.
Did you try heating the gas cylinder in the area where the plug screws in? I mean with a small torch. Use enough heat to change the color of the metal. If you did and were using good tools you are going to have to use destructive method.
I think I would use a dremel tool with a cut off wheel and cut the head of the plug off. Then using the same type tool cut the gas cyl lock in two. Do this very carefully of course with the barrel clamped in a padded vise jaws. and some way to steady your arms. This may sound extreme, but you are already out a plug this, just adds a lock. What you want to do is cut the lock in a manner that will allow the remaining piece to spin off the barrel. Once you have the gas cyl off you can put it in a vise and put some vise grips on the stub and hope it unscrews.
When forced to use destructive measures destroy the cheapest parts first. Doing what I suggest probably will require several cut off wheels and if you are not skillful could result in damage to the barrel.

Best of luck to you for a difficult situation!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,097 Posts
Wow... a 6-point socket really had to stretch to round off the flats like that. A shame they got that so gorilla tight.
If you have access to a 3/8" air hammer 6-point, you might could crank it with that.
Just to make sure, this is an M1A, not a Poly or Norinco, right?

Hope you get it soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,909 Posts
Go to an auto parts store and get some stripped nut tools. They work like an easy out but they grip on the outside.
Bob

4th awards idea, or first you could try an impact 3/8" 6pt socket that grabs the flats instead of the corners. Try an ever so small amount of heat(propane at most) and quench with PB Blast. Like others have said, focus your effort on the cheapest parts first.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,214 Posts
Go to an auto parts store and get some stripped nut tools. They work like an easy out but they grip on the outside.
Bob
That's a new one on me. Thanks for teaching an old dog a new trick. This looks promising. Some heat may still be required. The thing could be Loctite'd in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
due to threads being so fine in the gas cylinder and on the gas plug , if its stripped in the bore more likely than not if the threads are rechased the pressure from the gases will blow out the plug both will be stripped because some knucklehead installed it incorrectly at the factory.
to be safe replace the gas cylinder and gas plug .
regards jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,510 Posts
due to threads being so fine in the gas cylinder and on the gas plug , if its stripped in the bore more likely than not if the threads are rechased the pressure from the gases will blow out the plug both will be stripped because some knucklehead installed it incorrectly at the factory.
to be safe replace the gas cylinder and gas plug .
regards jeff
Wise advice

One thing you could try is to file the flats of the plug to remove the rounded edges and work a 9 or 10mm socket or wrench on there for a tighter fit (10mm is closest to 3/8, but ymmv) I'd prefer a wrench to minimize the chance of the tool twisting off of the plug head. Be sure to use high quality tools that will grip the head securely and not round it off again.
If you decide to use heat in this case you have to be very careful and work fast. Your goal is to try to expand the gas cylinder threads just enough to loosen the them a bit, but if enough heat gets transferred to the plug threads then they expand too and you've defeated your purpose. If you change the color of the metal it's probably too late due to the rate of heat transfer through something this small and thin.

Even if all this works, if there's any chance the threads are damaged you need to follow the advice above, so it might be prudent to just skip to cutting the lock and replacing the whole thing. I wouldn't be happy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,574 Posts
At least gas plugs are cheap. The torque specs are 15 foot pounds +/- 2 foot pounds. (Sorry about the inch pound error - it must have been something I drank...)
I've run into very tight gas plugs on SA rifles before. I think those high school kids they hire to come in and do assembly work after school may not know how to use a torque wrench.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,510 Posts
At least gas plugs are cheap. The torque specs are 15 inch pounds +/- 2 inch pounds.
I've run into very tight gas plugs on SA rifles before. I think those high school kids they hire to come in and do assembly work after school may not know how to use a torque wrench.
I've seen 15 and 23 cited as the spec, is one correct or is this the acceptable range? I have a bad habit of "if tight is good then tighter is better" and I don't want to end up in the same boat as the op.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,006 Posts
Go to an auto parts store and get some stripped nut tools. They work like an easy out but they grip on the outside.
Bob
Yes and I would liberally apply some Kroil or penetrating oil at the flange juncture of the gas plug. Let it sit overnight so the oil has a chance to seep in the threads. Tapping on the plug with a non-marring hammer might help to loosen it. dozier
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
Top