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Discussion Starter #1
I just had another M305 in my shop that was, for the lack of a better description, partially destroyed by a fellow who is supposed to be some sort of a gunsmith, who tried to remover the spot welded flash hider. So I thought that I would post this to show people that it is possible to construct a device that will pull, pressed in and spot welded on banded sights and flash hider off most firearms without destroying the device, bending the barrels or ripping the finish to hell. It takes about a day to make the unit and the materials cost is under $40 so it's a worthwhile investment in time and money spent. Any gunsmith, good hobbyist or first year machinist should be able to make it with little trouble. The device works well and I have pulled a good many M305 and other sights to date with no failures what-so-ever.

[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8LUH0kfXSws[/ame]
 

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Interesting rig. I thought the use of the adjustable wrenches a bit unusual.
Looked as though the front sight was quite long.
All in all , very informative and I enjoyed the break in the office here.

Semper Fi
Art
 

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Breaking the welds... That explains it. I thought it was just the Canadian's way of making a simple operation very complex and using a punch to loosen the castle nut? One more reason I choose not to work on Chinese rifles.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited by Moderator)
Breaking the welds... That explains it. I thought it was just the Canadian's way of making a simple operation very complex and using a punch to loosen the castle nut? One more reason I choose not to work on Chinese rifles.
Yup. Sheers the spot welds right off without tearing the flash hider to pieces. Will also pull the pressed on flash hiders and sights off the 858 and others without damage. Then they can be reamed out a couple of thousandths and slipped back on at the owners discretion.

Breaking the welds... That explains it. I thought it was just the Canadian's way of making a simple operation very complex and using a punch to loosen the castle nut? One more reason I choose not to work on Chinese rifles.
We don't have much of a choice about working on the Norinco M305s here Ted. The kids can buy them for $600 CAD which is about $450 USD so there are M305s and SKS rifles in every pickup truck around here. But money is money so I work on a lot of things that others would pee on. LOL
 

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Is the flash hider welded to overcome a restriction on threaded barrels? I can't imagine a voluntary reason for adding a production step.

In California, we can't have threaded pistol barrels so the compensators are permanently attached. This works fine for 1911s but not so good for guns where the barrel is removed out the rear (bottom) of the slide. Glocks, for example, have internal compensators with ports through the slide.
 

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Nice tool, nice work! I am envious that you are allowed to have the M305 rifles. I wish we could import them here. Thanks for the post/vid
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm not sure why the Chinese weld them. It's always been an enigma to me. I thought it might their version of over-manufacturing. Better safe than sorry or possibly it has something to do with the laws regaurding export to some country's might be tricky if a suppressor could readily be screwed on. Some times you just have to shake your head and say: "it is what it is."
 

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The Chinese welded the castle nut on US import rifles to comply with the federal AWB back in 1998. I'm not sure why they are no longer imported, but I seem to recall a commerce restriction on military style semi-auto rifles instigated by the President. It would be nice to have an inexpensive alternative in the M14 market even though I don't personally care for anything Made in China. Do you suppose that Springfield had anything to do with the restrictions? Reminds me of the time Harley Davidson got congress to pass an import tariff on Japanese motorcycles.
 

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Yeah, my US customers are forever complaining about not being able to get Norinco in the States. If memory serves Norinco screwed themselves out of that market by attempting to export some blacklisted articles into the country. After that they were blackballed. Or so the story goes.
I'm probably going to get yelled at for this but I'm a long ways off so I know that no one cant hit me. The early Asian stuff from 40 years ago was complete crap. Not just the guns, but machines and tooling as well. And I don't mean crap in the way that proud patriots say crap. It was actually total crap ! Soft steel and horrendous tolerances. I have worked in gun shops and machine shops with old Chinese equipment that you couldn't keep a shaft to a 1/64th with. Without one word of exaggeration. Some of the older guns would make maybe a couple boxes of shells until sears, firing pins and extractors would peen over.
But like the Japanese when they modernized, the Chinese are getting right up there in their stuff. Just about anything I see now days coming into Canada from China, guns included, is top notch stuff and equal in quality to the American, Japanese and European stuff. The down side to it is the pinch that we all feel from Chinas low labor rates. But I guess on the flip side of it we might have to criticize our own high labor rates and our belief that a burger flipper should make the same coin as a surgeon. Whatever.
I don't know if you guys are seeing it here but our new junk guns are the Turkish made firearms. They look nice on the outside, but when you break them apart they are just garbage inside and the parts are rough and as soft as the old Asian made guns. I guess it just takes time to figure out how to make stuff.
 
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