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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Aloha:

Just posted this next door... and thought it would be appropriate here too...

Ever since I saw Lamey's Tiger Stripe that he sold to SixTGunr, I have wanted one. Then Six pops up with Twin Tigers and both Devines... Wow! :eek: This really got me going. So, I decided to try my hand at finishing one...

This is my first attempt on a Birch stock with some stripes...


With Les Tam sling...


Not complete without a Dummy Selector kit from Hawk!


Stripes on forearm wraps nicely...


A little Closer Up...


Yep, I used the Devine to take the pics...


The stripes are sometime hard to capture in pictures and depends on the angle to see the inbedded grain of the wood.

I hope you like pics... it was part of my latest project and its been keeping me busy for a while now...

A special Thank You to Matt Lamey for helping me with his procedures on refinishing stocks.

Aloha and Best Wishes,

Tom O.
 

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O.K. Tom

Now you've gone and done it! I'm going to have to start looking for a Tiger. That looks Fantastic 8) !
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Aloha Maze...

Thanks! Hahaha! :lol: That's pretty funny! You would not believe it but it was black as coal and I couldn't see any stripes on the stock... but after stripping it, it started to take on a whole different look...

I ended up doing this one three times... each time it did not look like how I wanted or imagined it to look like... the first time, it still had dings and it really bugged me... so I kept redoing it... this last time, I'm kinda happy that it all came together... or I would have not dared show it...

Give it a twirl, it will be fun! And the best part is that you have something to show for it at the end... I see Hawk coming out with some really nice beauties himself...

But its all SixTGunr's fault... everytime, I looked at his stocks, I kept wanting one for myself... well I got one... but its still a first attempt...

Good luck! I'd like to see how yours come out... Cool! :lol:

Aloha and Best Wishes,

Tom O.
 

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Tonmodachi, We all have to start somewhere.....it's fortunate that you had such a nice piece of wood to work with.....great confidence builder.......It's a special piece :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Aloha PapaFoxTrot:

This is what RMLamey posted before...

If it has nice tiger stripes and you want to really bring them out follow these procedures.

Go to Wal Mart and buy the following-

1 can of "Klean Strip" stripper
1 can of Acetone (i buy it by the Gallon, but you could use the smaller)
1 multi pack of steel wool, comes in 0 to 0000 (coarse to ultra fine)
1 can of boiled linseed oil
1 bottle of Homer Formby lemon oil

You will also need some Chromic Trioxide for best results in color, the military stain that brownells sells also works but not as well.

IF there are no MAJOR gouges/dings that need repair i wouldnt even bother sanding it. I NEVER biol or "dishwash" any wood, introduction of hot water/steam to a stock that is already shaped can present major problems that i wont go into here.

Any how, here is what i do-

Take off all hardware that you can, preferably everything. If you cant get the front sling swivel off, then be extremely carefull to work around it. This also applies to any carthouche or other markings, DO NOT work them over, work AROUND them!

1- With a clean rag apply generous coats of Kleen Strip. Let soak, wipe off. Do this several times, until all heavy finish is gone.
2- With the coarse steel wool hold stock over clean bucket and scrub stock with wool pad that is SOAKED in Acetone. Repeat this step until the stock is "white".
3- Take the stock from the coarse steel wool down to the finest 0000 pad. Work entire stock over until all coarse wool scratches are smoothed over.
4- With a clean rag, wipe down stock with Acetone to remove all steel wool and wood residue.
5- After stock dries completely, apply an even but generous amount of Chromic Trioxide with a clean rag.
6- Let Chromic TRioxide dry well, will take at least an hour. At first the stock will look yellow and you will be wanting to puke its so ugly. After drying a while it will take more of a red/brown look, but it will still be flat, dull and ugly..... but do not despair.
7- Apply generous coat of Boiled Linseed oil, let soak for a few minutes then scrub with 0000 steel wool. IMMEDIATELY wipe off BLO and steel wool residue! REPEAT this step until you get the color you want, the more you scrub the lighter the stock will be, so dont over do it.
8- After proper color is achieved, start applying coats of BLO with a clean lint free cloth. Apply the coats even and light. After about every other coat, LIGHTLY rub down with 0000 steel wool to even BLO coats out.
Repeat this for as long as you feel like it, but at least until the stock gets a smooth even look.
9- After you are satisfied with your BLO application (should have been at least 6 coats, drying between etc). Wipe down with Homer Formby Lemon Oil. This will really bring some rich color out and will really make the stock look deep. I do this a few coats, then mix some Lemon Oil, BLO, and stock wax together. Make kind of a slurry and apply this for about 10 coats.

Your good to go now
WARNING: If Chromium Trioxide is used, please note all warnings and take all precautions in using this product.

Anyway, this is what I do, generally when refinishing...

Remove all metal from the stock... the metal that cannot be taken off should be taped up (like we did when we painted cars)...

Use Different's method of removing the old finish... it strips the stocks well... Purple Power or something like that... I use Kleen Strip.

Then, lightly sand (I know people don't like it but I do it and it comes out well for me... but it is mainly to remove surface imperfections. I do use some water and an iron to steam out dents but I do NOT immerse the stock and I never use the dish washer (which I don't have)...

After the stock is prepped and looking good... almost like raw wood with no (or very little) dings or dents, then start the staining (if you want to). Stain evenly until you achieve the color you want. If there are any light areas, this is the time to even it out... while it is still UNFINISHED... raw or open wood...

Before the finish phase, the color and uniformity in the stock should be there... the TruOil will lock it in place.

After the stain is to my liking, I TruOil the interior of my stock to moisture proof it... and to test the finish on my stain... Yep, I stain the inside of the forearm as a test area... and then let it dry thoroughly.

When dry, I apply a light coat of TruOil to the outside stained areas... using my finger... I like to rub it in and keep the layer very thin... make sure you do NOT have runs... apply as necessary until the outside of the stock is covered with a THIN layer of TruOil. Let DRY thoroughly!!!

Apply another thin layer but paying more attention to runs... keep it thin and uniform... Let dry thoroughly...

Repeat until satisfied... the TruOil will create a gorgeous finish on your stock... but it will be very GLOSSY... no problems there...

When the stock is completely dry... to the touch... I then apply a light rub using #0000 steel wool. This will remove the gloss and leave a satin sheen... you might be able to see some light scratches... no problem again...

Note: You can use #0000 steel wool between applications of TruOil if you feel that it needs it... but I normally find it not necessary... if you do use steel wool in between coats, then make sure that all wool is removed before the next coat... I use compressed air in a can... it works well... just a note...

Use Howard's Restore-A-Shine Polishing Compound and it will remove the scratches left behind from the #0000 steel wool... this compound is used for fine furniture and will give you that deep glass look but with the satin finish still there...

I sometimes finish with Howard's Orange Oil... it puts a nice touch to the hard work that has been done. But not really necessary.

I hope this helps some... Good luck on your endeavors...

Aloha and Best Wishes,

Tom O.
 

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Tomodachi, Thanks for passing along the refinishing info. It's good to know the different varients that people are using to refinish stocks.
 

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Aloha Hawk:

Glad to help in any way I can... maybe some of that information that I posted will help someone.

Cool! BTW: You were right, I was lucky to get some fairly nice wood to work with.

Aloha,

Tom O.
 

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That's a beautiful rifle! My stock was also black and sticky, and after cleaning, the strippes appear.
You must be proud on the result, nice pictures BTW.

Roger
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Aloha Dutchman2:

Thanks! I'm proud of the stock now... but this was my third crack at getting it right... and I still think I could have tried other options... but next time...

I was more surprised than anything else as the stripes appeared... it was under some of the most blackest of finishes...

Aloha,

Tom O.
 

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Tom, thanks for the thorough information.

BTW, I don't know a thing about chromic trioxide, but it sounds [email protected] I might just skip that step, and stick with whatever results the stain produces.

(It wasn't long ago when many of us were using trichlorethane like water. No brain, no pain.)

It's a good thing we have stuff like Castrol Super Clean to degrease with now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yo PapaFoxTrot:

Yep, that Chromic Trioxide is powerful stuff... it does have redeeming properties in that it brings out contrasting colors well... but it is harsh stuff... your idea may be the way to go...

Are you working on anything right now? Post some of your projects...

Aloha and Best Wishes,

Tom O.
 
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