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my Brother did his basic at Fort Knox.

he said they had a worse hill in Germany. I don't know, I didn't go visit but I will trust his word. He is a little bit of a 'fat boy' so if he can do it, I bet any of you 'buff boys' can. ;)
 

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I did Basic and AIT at Knox generally from 10/1/71 to 2/28/72. MOS was Armor. I'll never forget spraying the side of a M60-A1 with a fire hose and seeing the water freeze instantly....freaking cold! Have been up and down those hills several times going somewhere or another at Knox. Was SOOOO thankful I was never a road guard but all in all had a good time in Basic...

Thanks for posting and bringing back the memory
I know what you mean about winter at Knox. I did my Cav Scout OSUT at Knox from January - April 1982. Still not as cold as Minnesota in the winter, but no fun at all. Funny you mentioned road guards because I got picked for road guard and hated every minute of it - that stupid orange vest and having to be one step ahead of the rest of the platoon on a march. The drill sgt would say, "Column left/right (whichever) march!" and I had to turn right on the "left" or "right" while everyone else had the luxury of waiting until the "march!".
 

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Ah, the 3 sisters. God's own surprise to a BCT road march. Did Basic and 11D (then)/19D (now) AIT there in '74, C-19-5 and A-5Cav-1. In Basic the first one we met was Hearbreak at a double time in the pouring rain. We hit quick time PDQ about 100 yards into it. We ended up with guys puking, crying, and several of us took turns carrying the chaplains assistant or his gear for the last half of that bitch. Back then everyone, regardless of MOS, took the same Basic then went on to their MOS specific AIT.

Thanks for the pics. They bring back some memories.
 

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Oh man, and I had almost blocked that out of my memory. So we were at the range one day in February 82, middle of my Cav Scout OSUT at Knox and the Drill Sergeants made up some BS reason to yell at us, apparently we were moving too slow or something, and told us our reward was a little detour on our way back to the armory. We were then introduced to Agony and Misery. I honestly don't remember if we went down Agony and came up Misery or vice versa, but honestly, what does it matter? And don't for a minute think that coming down was cake. First, it's so steep that you're practically falling down on your face and, second, the whole way down you are getting an increasingly terrifying picture of how bad going back up is going to be. So finally we get to the bottom and start up. We're wearing full packs and, well, it's bad. Really bad. Try looking at those pictures and imagine how bad it might be, then multiply that times 10 - that's how bad it was. Why do they position Army training centers in particularly hilly areas? Because screw you, that's why. There was literally only one thing that got me to the top. My buddy was right behind me and every time I started to slow down he would haul off and whack me with the butt of his rifle. Hard. Lots and lots of times. I did the same favor for the guy in front of me. All the way up all you could hear was guys huffing and puffing and the sound of "WHACK, WHACK, WHACK" when a guy would hit the guy in front of him with the butt of his 16. And that's how we got to the top. I still often think about that march and it seriously helped to make me the man I am today. It showed me that if I really, really pushed myself and had a friend ready to kick me square in the butt if I slowed down that I could do anything. That hill pushed me to my very limits - there were plenty of times I honestly thought I was not going to make it to the top - but together we beat that hill. Many times during my service and in my civilian life I look back at climbing that hill and it has become a metaphor for life. I know now that if I'm willing to push myself to the limit I can get through whatever tough time I'm having. That hill has paid me so many benefits, I just can't even tell you - but if you marched that hill or one like it, I don't need to explain it because you already know. Hooah! Scouts Out!
Did that in the rain and when we got to the top the water was running about a foot deep in the gutters (which we walked thru) all the way back to the Barracks!
 

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I met that hill at Knox in a driving rain the day before Thanksgiving 1990. My feet are still hurting.
 

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Oh man, and I had almost blocked that out of my memory. So we were at the range one day in February 82, middle of my Cav Scout OSUT at Knox and the Drill Sergeants made up some BS reason to yell at us, apparently we were moving too slow or something, and told us our reward was a little detour on our way back to the armory. We were then introduced to Agony and Misery. I honestly don't remember if we went down Agony and came up Misery or vice versa, but honestly, what does it matter? And don't for a minute think that coming down was cake. First, it's so steep that you're practically falling down on your face and, second, the whole way down you are getting an increasingly terrifying picture of how bad going back up is going to be. So finally we get to the bottom and start up. We're wearing full packs and, well, it's bad. Really bad. Try looking at those pictures and imagine how bad it might be, then multiply that times 10 - that's how bad it was. Why do they position Army training centers in particularly hilly areas? Because screw you, that's why. There was literally only one thing that got me to the top. My buddy was right behind me and every time I started to slow down he would haul off and whack me with the butt of his rifle. Hard. Lots and lots of times. I did the same favor for the guy in front of me. All the way up all you could hear was guys huffing and puffing and the sound of "WHACK, WHACK, WHACK" when a guy would hit the guy in front of him with the butt of his 16. And that's how we got to the top. I still often think about that march and it seriously helped to make me the man I am today. It showed me that if I really, really pushed myself and had a friend ready to kick me square in the butt if I slowed down that I could do anything. That hill pushed me to my very limits - there were plenty of times I honestly thought I was not going to make it to the top - but together we beat that hill. Many times during my service and in my civilian life I look back at climbing that hill and it has become a metaphor for life. I know now that if I'm willing to push myself to the limit I can get through whatever tough time I'm having. That hill has paid me so many benefits, I just can't even tell you - but if you marched that hill or one like it, I don't need to explain it because you already know. Hooah! Scouts Out!
Well said, my man. WELL said! One thing those three damned hills DID do, though.....they built MEN!!
 

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I remember those hills. They sucked. I remember just tucking my chin into my chest. Then I just walked. My Drill Sergeant yelled at me to slow down. For some reason I did not have as hard of a time than others on those hills. Even when carrying the SAW. But looking at those pictures now makes my feet and butt hurt.
 

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Lifetime at Knox

Basic - 1980, OBC - 1984, AOAC - 1989, current assignment - 2011 to present. Love the post, really hate those hills, but what great memories after the fact, huh?
 

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Why did they move the Scouts and Tankers?
BRAC. The same people that moved Ordnance from APG to Ft. Lee but are still keeping APG open for some reason.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Why did they move the Scouts and Tankers?
So they could send them to Benning and spoil them like the Infantry basic trainees and make a bunch of pansies.

Basic Trainees get weekend passes every week if they're not doing training in the field. The Rec Center on Harmony Church is packed on Friday nights with them and their families coming to visit.

And they're not allowed to run them farther than 2.5 miles for morning PT. They actually pulled all of them out of the last Armor School run when they hit the 2 mile mark.

It's disgusting.
 

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did boot and ait [ D-2-1] the winter of 79-80 there. grew up in the mntns and the cold had been climbing hills all my life those were still hell. hit ait an most of our time was on a vehicle or in a classroom.was glad to be done.
 

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As long as we are sharing along with a little bit of top this...A good chunk of our High School class was drafted and sent to Knox for Basic in July, August and part of September, '66 in the days when they were using the old WWII wood barracks. It was probably one of the hottest summers they've ever had with high 90's, low 100's and high humidity during the day and then it would cool down to the low 90's at night. If and when your fatigue shirt dried out from all the sweat, a big salt slick was left on the back. We hit Agony and Misery on a three night stroll to the field with full pack including our M14's. It was quite a hike but the Cadre in charge made us feel better by chanting "Jody was home when you left..." followed up with "I want to be and Airborne Range..." and finishing up with "Eskimo &%#$& is mighty cold.." ah entertainment! In spite of the heat I don't recall anyone ever breaking rank! Also because of the extreme heat we got bussed a lot. The DI, Sgt Hogg, was always along side of us all the way during those road marches (in his air-conditioned Cadillac Convertible)! B-19-5
 

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Not a veteran so, fortunately, I've never had to climb that hill with a full pack. But on a related note, over the years I've been on Ft. Knox several times and the hills in that picture look awfully familiar. My clearest memory was when I was driving to Scott Mtn range, early one morning, for a match. On the road there, there was a large group of soldiers marching in front of me. In looking at them from behind, I recall being real impressed with how they looked in their gear and weapons. Strong warriors that no enemy would want to mess with. As I was waived through the formation, and pulled alongside them, numerous heads would turn to look at me and as some would sneak in a little waive with the hand, I could see their faces. It was then that it really dawned on me that these were KIDS (at least compared to me)! It was one of those moments when one stops and reflects.
 

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I also had the pleasure of visiting Knox in 1966, although my stay was considerable colder. Enjoyed Thanksgiving turkey, completed Basic on my birthday the end of January. I was also in the old WWII wood barracks. We kept the windows down 6" on one side and up 6" on the other side for "cross ventilation". Top bunk, head near window. Woke to snow flakes hitting me many mornings. End of cycle we broke down and cleaned our M-14's. Laid the parts out on white sheets on our bunks. When they picked them up to inspect a part, there had better not be a dirt or oil stain on the sheet. Our DI, Sgt. Spice, had stories about his time "in country". Did AIT there also, anyone remember the old M114s.
 
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