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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are you folks using for stoves for SHTF or whatever. I am mainly discussing a packable fuel stove. My faves are MSR Stoves. I have the Dragonfly stove which uses a fuel bottle and white gas (or gas or diesel). The Dragonfly is a beast and burns really hot and will run for about 10 hours on 1 fuel bottle and the MSR Isopro stove which uses those little red canisters and works great. Just wondering what everyone else is using. Anyone using the MSR Reactor?
 

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I've been using Don Johnston Photon Stove (that I made myself) for years. LIGHT, cheap, reliable. You make it out of aluminum cans, and it burns alcohol. It cooks as fast as any MSR. Frankly, I sold my MSR because the Photon stove worked better and was lighter, and even packs inside the pots.
http://www.backpacking.net/makegear/photon-stove/

This is the User's Guide.
http://www.backpacking.net/makegear/photon-stove/AlcoholStoveUserGuide.html

Learning how to make your own stove seems like it would be a VALUABLE skill to know someday, either for your own emergency use or even for barter items!
 

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I still use my trusty old Swedish Svea, with Coleman fuel. Simple, lightweight, no pump, easy to clean and maintain, thrifty on fuel, and the fuel is available almost everywhere. I also have a Coleman Peak 1 that's a bit larger, and uses a pump, which has the added virtue of being able to burn unleaded gasoline as well as Coleman fuel, in an emergency.
 

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I'm also using the DragonFly. Nice stove. Burns anything but I've heard that diesel is really dirty.
 

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I still use my trusty old Swedish Svea, with Coleman fuel. Simple, lightweight, no pump, easy to clean and maintain, thrifty on fuel, and the fuel is available almost everywhere. I also have a Coleman Peak 1 that's a bit larger, and uses a pump, which has the added virtue of being able to burn unleaded gasoline as well as Coleman fuel, in an emergency.
I had forgotten all about the SVEA sitting on my mantle. I used it for backpacking for about 20 years. Great, small stove.
 

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For a survival stove nothing competes with the MSR XGK
http://cascadedesigns.com/msr/stoves/expedition-stoves/xgk-ex/product

This stove will burn anything flammable, yes the heat output may not be that hot and the fumes may be toxic but any liquid that is flammable it will produce heat.

Being a guide/outdoor instructor in Alaska has afford me the opportunity to either use or see in use just about every outdoor stove there is. My #1 stove is the MSR Superfly with the Bibler hanging kit. I use MSR 1.5 liter ti pot with MSR IsoPro fuel. Stove, hanging kit, fuel cartridge, wind screen, lighters, pot handle will all fit inside the 1.5 pot. There is some objection to cartridge stoves use in the cold but very few places on earth are as cold as winter in Alaska and I used this stove year round guiding and personal trips, never failed to produce heat.

For anyone wanting a tip for use in the cold, before opening the valve on your cartridge stove, flick your bic under the fuel cart and let the flame run along the bottom of the fuel cart for about 10 seconds. Lite your stove, instant heat. Every once in a while flick the bic under the fuel cart and it will run hot until the fuel is gone.

Of course you can build a heater out of copper pipe but the above trick works just as efficient.

Some info pasted from my web site:

# Light-Weight Cook Kit: A MSR PocketRocket stove, MSR IsoPro fuel canister, pot gripper, lighter, homemade windscreen out of heavy-duty aluminum foil, spoon, homemade fuel cartridge heater; the whole cook kit, fits inside the MSR 2-Liter Titanium pot.

* While the above is arguably the lightest with full heat output, it requires the stove to used on the floor of your tent or the ground in nasty weather. This will take up space but more important, the chance of spilling your water soaking your gear and wasting fuel. The SuperFly stove used with Bibler Hanging System will hang from the apex of your tent giving more room and less chance of spilling. Use a mug /cup to dip from the pot as the water warms, immediately replacing it with snow, instead of trying to remove the pan and pour the water. This will keep a steady supply of water melting / heating / consuming to save fuel.

* The main drawback to cartridge stoves are their poor performance in below freezing temperatures. Heating of the fuel cartridge will help combat this. There are many ways but the most consistent is a fuel cartridge heater: take 2-feet of 1/4" diameter copper plumbers pipe and smash flat with a hammer. Place the middle of the smashed pipe directly above the burner of the stove and form the copper pipe down and along the sides of the fuel cartridge. Bend the ends up under the bottom of the fuel cartridge and trim to fit. Take closed-cell foam and duct tape, and make a removable sleeve to fit over the cartridge and fuel cartridge heater. (The lid section of a 40 Below one-quart neoprene water bottle cover works best) Lining the sleeve with aluminum foil will help keep the foam / neoprene from melting and discharging fumes. This procedure is very hazardous and all stove manufactures warrant against it.

# Cooking With Ease: When water boils or gets hot enough, turn off the stove. Combine the water (leave a small amount in the pan) and dehydrated food inside a cooking bag. Mix and then place the cooking bag back inside your pan with the lid on. Let the pan sit for 10-12 minutes on a foam sleeping pad or the hanging system, not on cold ground. Eating directly out of the bag is for super-light fanatics (or close friends) with less chance for spills or use your cup. A bagel will clean the cooking bag for re-use or use the bag for trash. This will save fuel, time and requires no clean up.

* Lay your pan on a foam pad and trace its outline then cut it out forming a round pad. Trim to fit the inside diameter of your pan so the pad just barely slides in and out of the pan. Punch a small hole in the center and thread a small cord making a handle then wrap aluminum foil around the whole pad. Place the round pad inside your pan when melting snow / boiling water to decrease boil times whilst saving fuel. This round pad can serve as the pan lid (leave the lid at home) and doubles for many other uses.

# Wintertime Feast: Pre-cook meat, package it in one Ziplock bag for each meal and freeze it solid before leaving. Bury in the snow at camp to keep frozen. Add de-hydrated meals such as Hamburger Helper or Hearty Stew mixes for a great tasting wintertime feast of course leave the packaging at home. Tastier and cheaper than store bought freeze-dried meals. To keep that tasty hot meal hot, make a removable sleeve for your bowl / cup out of pieces of closed-cell foam, holding the sleeve together with duct tape.

# Summertime Cooking: Leave the stove at home and purify water in the area with iodine treatment tabs. Add flavoring to rid the taste. Take food that doesn't require cooking; sandwiches, salami, cheese, pizza slices, fruit, veggies, bagels, etc. Try taking frozen food and let thaw during the day. Depending on the food and weather it can last up to several nights.

# Sweetening Taste: Instead of using refined white sugar, add powered Gator-Aid or its like to sweeten coffee, tea, oatmeal, cereal, etc. Adds a unique flavor plus has nutritional benefit compared to refined sugar.

# Melting Water in a Snow Camp: Dig a 2-foot deep hole with the circumference several inches smaller than a black plastic lawn bag. Place a wide mouth container in the center of the hole. Punch a hole in the center of the plastic bag and lay over the hole. Seal off the edges of the bag with large berms of snow. Place a small amount of snow at a time on the plastic bag and let the sun do its work. Increases the volume of water vs putting snow in a black plastic bag and laying on the snow. If traveling across snow / glacier, fill a heavy-duty black plastic bag with snow and drag it behind your sled while skiing. On the steeps, you can also drag a snow melt plastic bag up the climb. All these will save you time and fuel.
 

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I've got a Svea stove somewhere in my toolshed that's 40 years old. Good to know that it will burn gasoline.

I also have a 2-burner Coleman camp stove that runs on those little propane canisters. Anybody know where I can find an adapter so that I could hook it up to the big propane jug for my grill?
 

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I also have a Coleman 2 burner dual fuel stove. The SVEA is backpackin' stuff. The Coleman is truck camping' gear.
 

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I like the GI Pocket Stove.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GI_pocket_stove

They were small, reliable, & ran on gasoline. When we still had 1/4 tons (Jeeps), they were great. I have used them in all kinds of weather from wet jungle (Vietnam) to Fort Hood or Fort Riley to Germany. They are a winner.
Hey, I got one of those, too! I came across 5 of them a few years back, so I kept one and gave the others away to my brothers and friends. Cool little stove. What all can I burn in it?
Thanks,
Doc
 

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My smallest and lightest is an Optimus Nova that will burn about anything off of a separate fuel bottle w/ pump. Lantern fuel lights easier but something like kerosene produces more heat per bottle. The stove itself weighs easily less than a pound.

Then there's the two-burner and one-burner Coleman stoves, and a sgl-burner that sits on top of those one-pound propane bottles. I think that's it.
 

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MSR Whisper Lite Intl. Love that stove. Plus I get the bottles for it super cheap from the local surplus store. Plus it burns 4 differant types of gases.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
cool stove

My father bought me a sierra stove when I was in Scouts. Mine is an old C battery model but that thing is amazing. the new models look even handier. Boil water with pine needles and if you can find some old charcoal in firepits itll cook better than any I've used.
http://www.zzstove.com/sierra.html
I dont think you could be disappointed
Cool design. Any problems with the fan going out? I bet that stove could generate some heat.
 

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