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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is sort of a spin-off thread from Earthquakes thread about his reweld Tanker Garand, I didn't want to hijack his thread any more than I did...

I bought a FedOrd M1 Garand in OCT 1992 for $360; knowing nothing about the M1, I just loaded it up and went shooting. Although it worked well when I first bought it, it's reliability started to go downhill to a point where I'm not confident in shooting it, and I'm wondering what to do with it. The poor girl has been setting at the rear of the safe for the past 10 years... GI4

At this point, the op rod reciever tab has broken off and the en bloc clip won't eject from the receiver when it's empty... I'm thinking it's hitting the bottom of the bolt before the bolt it back far enough (early timing.) I bought a replacement op rod at a gun show, matching the part numbers from the original, but the new one won't cycle the action (short-stroke.)

The more I read about FedOrd the more I began to wonder what I got myself into... is it going to be worth what it's going to cost to repair this thing?

I tore it down this week... I don't believe it's a reweld receiver; I don't see any indications of a repair, all the wear marks are very even and the op rod channel, for example, is straight and true (using my highly calibrated eyes only.)

My initial concern was that I had a famous FedOrd 2-groove sleeved barrel, I found this to not be the case... it is a FedOrd 4-groove barrel... for whatever that's worth.

There is a lot of pitting in the lower part of the receiver, nothing perforated, I'm assuming this may be normal for the M1's returned from Korea or Greece (or whereever else they came from..) and the lack of maintenance? The repark job they did was a little funky... I think the only part they reparked was the receiver heel... in the photo of the receiver you can see the change in finish starts under the rear sight elevation knob... the park gets darker past that. They parked it so much, you can't really make out the 3rd digit of the SN# (302?72)

As far as the gen-u-wine FedOrd manufactured barrel... what is the consensus on that... is it worth keeping or are they 'unsafe at any speed?' At a minimum I'm going to need to have the timing adjusted, the op rod altered so it cycles the action and it desparately needs a new stock. I love shooting the M1, but I don't like wasting money...











 

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No. The only manufacturers that ever built USGI M1 Garands were Winchester, H&R, SAI and IHC.
I am aware of that. By the looks of that drawing number, I'd say it is a USGI receiver.

The drawing # coincides with the serial #.

Since it is a USGI receiver, I think the problems can be worked out.

Mike
 

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As long as your receiver is intact she's got a good heart and is therefore salvageable. When we were issued Garands, they were obsolete and many receivers had been through three or more rebuilds, so they're not only durable but forgiving. Have a pro look at it and as long as it's not a reweld, yours should be a simple fix. Good luck with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I broke it down about a year ago and cleaned it, I was mostly concerned about corrosion in the barrel, but I was also looking for broken parts or obvious defects. I use Rig +P grease for it, for the most part, CLP for the smaller things (like the trigger.)

Does anyone know of any real reason to replace the FedOrd barrel? I haven't really been able to find anything on whether their barrels were decent or not... and by decent, I mean safe. It's accurate enough for my purposes, I just don't want a catastrophic failure.
 

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SA is Springfield Armory & they made alot of Garands. SAI is Springfield Armory, Inc & has no connection to the original Springfield Armory.

Being you probably have a good receiver, I would suggest sending it to someone that specializes in tankers. They will inspect everything & let you know what all needs replaced & cost.
 

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I have a Federal Ordnance Tanker that my Dad bought in the mid-80s. No sleeved barrel, no re-weld, but it had premature ejectulation. Bruce Dow fixed it with a properly-timed bullet guide.

It then developed a crack in the piston portion of the op-rod. Ron Smith made me a new op-rod.

I plan to put a couple deer in the freezer with it this fall, the same way it has served me for the past 10 years.

Get thyself to a qualified Garand armorer and you will be passing it down to your grandson.
 

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Charlie, is yours a tanker or not? Unclear from the first post. I have a Federal Ordnance "tanker" with a Springfield (unwelded) receiver and it was okay for a while but had reliability probs the last time I took it out. I'm waiting to get the courage and money to send it to someone.

The different park color on the heel is usually indicative of a "lead-dipped" receiver. For a while WWII receivers were re-heat-treated and they dipped the heel in lead. I have a couple receivers like that. Yours is likely one.

You can see the different heel color in the top one and fourth one down in this picture (both WWII Springfield receivers; both have been re-parked but the color difference remains)
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yes, it's a standard M1 Garand... NOT a tanker. That's interesting about the 'lead dipped' thing, I can see the difference in your receivers... they look just like mine does.

I'm willing to spend some money to get it running again... if it's worth it in the long run. CMP field grade Springfield is $550 or so, if I can get it up and running for less than half that, I'd be OK with it.
 

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I was stationed in California and worked A BUNCH of Fed Ord Marked Garands from 1989 through 1993. During that time period, they imported a whole bunch of GI M1 Garands back from Korea so MOST of the rifles from that time period indeed had GI receivers. Fed Ord had some commercially made receivers made up before so many guns came back from Korea and the quality of those commercial receivers was unserviceable to at best poor. I always advise against buying one of their commercially made receivers.

I am fairly certain your receier is not re weld, BUT to be more confident, we need to perform the following inspection check.

One check I have learned to do when inspecting Garands for civilians is to compare the ACTUAL serial number to the receiver drawing number. Re welded receivers almost never have the correct receiver drawing number for the serial number, as they just welded together cut pieces of receivers. One of your pictures shows the drawing number and that’s great. Now we need the serial number to check against it. It was like pulling teeth to get enough of the serial number in a different thread for us to check this, so I will try to explain it differently this time.

Let’s say your actual serial number is 2, 543,726. What you can do for security sake, on this public forum, is change the last two digits (I.E. the 26) to “xx.” That would make the serial number THEN read “2, 543,7xx .” We MUST have at least the first and second digits correct from the actual serial number AND we MUST have the correct amount of digits that are in your serial number, even if you would like to make the last two digits into “xx.” So, by using the serial number as “2, 543,7xx ” we have numbers and letters representing ALL the digits in the real/actual serial number. That way we can compare the serial number to the receiver drawing number and if they do not match up for the time the receiver was made, then we know it is a welded receiver. If the Mi Garand serial number and receiver drawing number DO match up for the time the receiver was made, it is a pretty safe bet the receiver is NOT a reweld and most likely SAFE, if not otherwise damaged.

Fed Ord did not make barrels, but they had new commercial barrels MADE that were marked “Fed Ord.” Most of the barrels that Fed Ord used in that time period were made by the Citadel Barrel company and they were not bad barrels. A whole lot of them were as good as any new GI barrel. Sometimes they added a stamped “Fed Ord” to a GI barrel as well and some folks get confused about that. All that means is the barrel was/is a GI barrel and they just stamped “Fed Ord” onto it.

I actually bought and used quite a few bare M1 Garand receivers in those years until they ran out of them. When they had a REALLY worn out rifle or barreled receiver, they pulled the barrel and stamped FED ORD on the receiver to comply with the import regulations. However, there is a “gotcha” on some of those receivers and a very few receivers they built into rifles. If the serrations on the receivers for the elevation pinion are REALLY worn out, you are never going to get a Post WWII adjustable rear sight to work correctly UNLESS a “half minute disc” is glued to the receiver.
If you disassemble the rear sight and when you take the elevation pinion off, you will see these serrations. If they are very worn and can not be used with an adjustable Post WWII rear sight, they can almost always be used either with WWII Lock Bar sights or by having a ½ minute disc installed. If the serrations are not well worn, then an adjustable Post WWII or even a NM Rear Sight may be fitted to the receiver.
 

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Gus, thanks for the info. I don't mean to hijack this thread but I was wondering if you could confirm that my serial and drawing number match for the correct time period. My poor research shows that it does but I'd like your opinion as well. This may also help the OP if his serial and drawing number are in a similar range:

U.S. Rifle
CAL 30 M1
SPRINGFIELD ARMORY
10041XX
Front right of receiver under op-rod:
D 28291-17
Above that: looks like R 3 SS

Trigger group:
D28290-5-SA
Bottom plate inside rear: 24

Op rod:
35382 8 SA

Rear of barrel:
looks like Fed.Ord.Inc.S.E.M.CA 3006

Bolt: 6528287-SA
B-2-0

All I've was able to find at the time of my initial search was an excerpt from an old discussion in which the receiver drawing number D 28291-17 is stated to be the "expected drawing number and revision no." for a SA receiver buit in Dec. of 1942... my Fed Ord T-26 replica's receiver was built by SA in November 1942 so I imagine the drawing number/receiver serial range is correct, at least. Right?

I also have a Blue Sky imported Springfield:
Receiver:
U.S. Rifle
CAL 30 M1
SPRINGFIELD ARMORY
30156XX
Front right of receiver under op-rod handle:
D 28291 34


I just happend to get lucky on a previous internet search with similar serial number/drawing numbers as others have queried.

The book shows July 44 3mil Ser#. With Drawing# D28291 34
Does that check out correctly?

Thanks for your patience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I am fairly certain your receier is not re weld, BUT to be more confident, we need to perform the following inspection check.

Fed Ord did not make barrels, but they had new commercial barrels MADE that were marked “Fed Ord.” Most of the barrels that Fed Ord used in that time period were made by the Citadel Barrel company and they were not bad barrels. A whole lot of them were as good as any new GI barrel. Sometimes they added a stamped “Fed Ord” to a GI barrel as well and some folks get confused about that. All that means is the barrel was/is a GI barrel and they just stamped “Fed Ord” onto it.
Gus, your post fills me with some hope, anyway, that I have a decent FedOrd M1 that is worthy of some effort. I did post the SN# in my OP, the 3rd digit is parked up so much I can't make it out, but the hanging tag says it's 302372 (and is what it appears to be,) so let's run with that. I had researched the SN# at one time, I think it's build date was May '42.

As I say, it's not a bad shooter (when it was shooting,) the barrel is fairly accurate, the rear sight clicks are fairly definite, and it was 100% reliable (minus the timing/en bloc clip eject issue and the broken op rod receiver tab.) I just want to make sure what I have is worthy... I don't take chances with questionable firearms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Rear of barrel:
looks like Fed.Ord.Inc.S.E.M.CA 3006
Looks like you and I have pretty much the same rifle... That's what my barrel reads, too.

Other details:

Both Op rods: D35382 9 SA
Bolt: D28287-12 SA
Trigger assy: D28290 W.R.A.
Hammer: C46008-5 SA

My receiver has on the R receiver leg: D 28291-9
and above that, very hard to read: R I or R T?
 

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Gus, thanks for the info. I don't mean to hijack this thread but I was wondering if you could confirm that my serial and drawing number match for the correct time period. My poor research shows that it does but I'd like your opinion as well. This may also help the OP if his serial and drawing number are in a similar range:

U.S. Rifle
CAL 30 M1
SPRINGFIELD ARMORY
10041XX
Front right of receiver under op-rod:
D 28291-17
Above that: looks like R 3 SS

My information shows to be a NOV/DEC 1942 rifle and the Heat lot DOES match the serial number, so you should be good go go.


I also have a Blue Sky imported Springfield:
Receiver:
U.S. Rifle
CAL 30 M1
SPRINGFIELD ARMORY
30156XX
Front right of receiver under op-rod handle:
D 28291 34
.
My information shows this to be an AUG 1944 rifle and the heat lot IS CORRECT for that receiver as well, so again, you should be good to go.
 
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