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If you don't get dimples on your primer, something is wrong.
 

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Not sure I woud be racking live ammo into a rifle in my house. A dummy round sure but not a live round.
 
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Federal Ordnance USGI M14
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Discussion Starter #25
CMI mags already - only 3rd party (1st party being Springfield or USGI, imo) brand I will buy. And yes, I agree and usually avoid racking live ammo indoors, but the range closest to me is still rather far away and I'd like to pinpoint the issue before my next visit as it may entail buying parts and doing work on my rifle. I do not own dummy rounds, would like to buy some soon though for things like this
 

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Did a little test last night. Took my 'main' magazine (which is broken in at this point) and loaded it to 20 rounds, locked my bolt back, inserted the mag, released and chambered the first round without issue. I could not fire as I was just testing inside my house. Then I tried the same with the magazine I used at the range - pushes that first round forward about 1/2".

So, I then loaded the magazine from the range with only 18 rounds, opened the bolt, seated the mag, released the bolt, and it chambers without issue. This is with a recoil spring that needs replaced, I'll have to run the test again once I get it. Also the rifle needs cleaned and lubed so I'm sure all of it in combination will add to the overall situation.

Kind of don't like the idea of running 18 rounds in a mag designed to hold 20. It's only 2 rounds but I feel I should be able to use the whole thing. I guess it's a trade off of capacity vs reliability - I don't think so highly of myself as to question the Marine Corps on its practices, anyways. On an aside note, does anyone else get little dimples on their primers if you chamber a round then eject it without firing? I know the firing pin in the bolt floats.
I have had the dimpled primers as described, until I started reloading. Kinda freaked me out. Now, I can clean primer pocket, though with new brass it is not needed, but I can seat the primer .005-.010, with no dimples. One has to have a secure feeling firing, otherwise you might as well be pissing in the wind.
 

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Federal Ordnance built two types of M14 rifles, one with USGI parts and one with Chinese parts. USGI parts were used extensively in Federal Ordnance rifles through at least S/N 8877. Through at least serial number 394X the USGI parts were taken off USGI M14 rifles imported from Israel. By serial number 9844, if not earlier, Chinese and Taiwanese reproduction parts were used to assemble its rifles. For example, Federal Ordnance M14SA serial number 502XX was assembled at the factory on September 13, 1991 with Chinese manufacture bolt, operating rod, firing mechanism and barrel. Receivers with serial numbers above 60XXX have engraved heel markings.
Maybe something else to peer into (assuming the Federal Ordnance rifle in your profile is the one in question, here).
 

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Yes, thats why seating depth is so critical and type of primer as well. Us hard shell primers like magnum or CCI brand if concerned, I use all manner of primers and have no problems but the floating pin can cause a slam fire with a high primer, or so the story goes. I have not ever been around one but others have.
 

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Hello - first time poster to the forums but been a lurker for a while. Proud owner of a Federal Ordnance M14A in the low serial number range, almost all USGI parts besides the receiver. Took my rifle to the range today and it shot great, decently accurate. However, I had some issues firing on the first few shots. It all went as follows

1) Lock the bolt back, insert a loaded 20 round CMI magazine into the magwell
2) Pull the bolt back and release to chamber the first round. Bolt pushes round forward a bit, but does not chamber. Have to push bolt forward manually to chamber
3) Fire the rifle. Rifle ejects the spent round and chambers the next. However, the bolt is not forward completely and the lugs are exposed/not turned into their proper recesses on the receiver
4) Manually push bolt forward the rest of the way
5) Repeat step 3 and 4 twice
6) Rest of the magazine fires without issue

*Note: I did get one nasty jam within this whole session. Casing was stuck in the chamber after firing once. Had to really work hard to get the bolt back but after did not happen again.

I used only 1 brand new CMI magazine the entire time at the range. I fired 60 rounds total - the steps above were consistent to a tee. The mag when fully loaded was a bit tight especially on the last round. Wondering if anyone has had a similar experience and if so what a good check/remedy would be.
My Gunsmithing Technology courses state that 98% of all problems are caused by magazine or ammo issues. Try different ammo first. If that doesn't work, try a different magazine manufacturer. If still no joy, then start looking at mechanical issues as suggested by other posters.
 

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I have had weird issues with PPU. I got a wooden ammo crate of match ammo in 200 rnd battle packs.

I finally sat down with some precision measuring instruments and found about halfway down the case, it flaired out more than Federal Gold metal or Winchester
 

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I was in the Marine Corps from '63 through '67. I was issued an M14. They did not have a 18 round in a 20 round magazine rule at that time. I did not experience feeding problems at any time. I carried 5 magazines when "in the field". My rifle was exposed to the elements while in the field so I kept moving parts clear of debris and dirt. When in Vietnam water was a premium. Some people didn't like us so would sabotage the water supply, so you didn't waste you canteen water on rinsing rifles. Once we won their hearts and minds:oops:, the water was safe.
I keep my magazines clean and made sure the magazines were clean inside and out. Magazines are easy to disassemble and reassemble.
Same goes for my Spriingfield M1A which does not see as much use.
 
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