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Discussion Starter #1
I got started on this in another thread, but eye protection is maybe something that more people pay lip service to than take seriously, and which many ignore completely. But if you're thinking of a time when no medical help will be available, and when bullets and fragments thereof are going to be flying around, kicking out high speed splinters and dirt and such, planning to have and use eye protection whenever possible makes a lot of sense. And then there's the concentrated risk of range shooting where you and people around you are blasting away with dozens to hundreds of rounds at a time. I've had a few split cases in my day, and have rifles and a handgun that regularly dump hot powder particles on my hands and cheek.

So, I recently bought a set of Smith Optics Aegis Arc eye protectors, meaning the eyeglass frames and a set of 3 quick-change lenses, in my choosing clear, amber, and grey. Haven't tried them in all conditions yet but they came highly recommended by someone who knows this stuff and make my previously best Ducks Unlimited shooting glasses look like Airsoft toys, I mean as far as the lenses go. The Smith lenses are in fact mil spec, which should do me good service: https://elite.smithoptics.com/technology/#/Premium+Protection/
 

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I always wear eye and hearing protection while shooting. Both are protecting me from possible injury to parts if my body that can not be fixed if damaged.
I don't wear shooting glasses, but rather I wear ANSI approved safety glasses, either tinted or clear, depending on my needs st the time.
I've never had a issue that required eye protection personally. But I did see a fellow once that was shooting a revolver and the cylinder did not rotate completely into the proper position. When he fired, the bullet sheared when entering the forcing cone and the fragment hit him in the cheek. He was very lucky. He was not wearing eye protection.
Anything could happen at anytime. People, keep yourself protected at all times. It only takes one incident to ruin your shooting career. And it doesn't even have to come from your firearm, it could come from the person shooting beside you. You don't know how well that person's firearm may or may not be maintained or what ammo they are using or whatever.
 

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I was saying in that other thread about hand warmers and skullcaps that guy started that eye protection is important and I take it very seriously at the range. But it hampers my peripheral vision and color distinction which can mean not seeing something I should have out in the bush and why I won't be wearing them a lot of the time when shtf if I even remember to grab them at all if I bugout. They'd get a good amount of use bugging in though, standing guard.

I've gone through lots of pairs, both expensive and not so much and have had a pretty good pair of Bolle's that have lasted me a few years now. Other than the damn rubber arm covers that keep coming unglued they are comfortable and provide a fair view and protection. Just the same it doesn't change how my vision is hampered and that could get me killed when shtf.


DI5
 

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I was saying in that other thread about hand warmers and skullcaps that guy started that eye protection is important and I take it very seriously at the range. But it hampers my peripheral vision and color distinction which can mean not seeing something I should have out in the bush and why I won't be wearing them a lot of the time when shtf if I even remember to grab them at all if I bugout. They'd get a good amount of use bugging in though, standing guard.

I've gone through lots of pairs, both expensive and not so much and have had a pretty good pair of Bolle's that have lasted me a few years now. Other than the damn rubber arm covers that keep coming unglued they are comfortable and provide a fair view and protection. Just the same it doesn't change how my vision is hampered and that could get me killed when shtf.


DI5

A good pair of wrap around Safety Glasses will allow you to use your peripheral vision, and give you some side protection. dozier
 

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A good pair of wrap around Safety Glasses will allow you to use your peripheral vision, and give you some side protection. dozier

Actually I think I've got a good solution. I've got near new pair of old timey issued googles around here somewhere in green issue box. I just need to find where I put them. In the BOB they'll go for eye protection in heavy wind, firefights and so on. They won't give sun protection, but I can live without that.


DI5
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I was saying in that other thread about hand warmers and skullcaps that guy started that eye protection is important and I take it very seriously at the range. But it hampers my peripheral vision and color distinction which can mean not seeing something I should have out in the bush and why I won't be wearing them a lot of the time when shtf if I even remember to grab them at all if I bugout. They'd get a good amount of use bugging in though, standing guard.

I've gone through lots of pairs, both expensive and not so much and have had a pretty good pair of Bolle's that have lasted me a few years now. Other than the damn rubber arm covers that keep coming unglued they are comfortable and provide a fair view and protection. Just the same it doesn't change how my vision is hampered and that could get me killed when shtf.


DI5
The Smith items I mentioned give 100% perhipheral vision, esp in the clear lens version, which of course does not distort colour either. They are in fact the version used by special forces, one of the few things they use that I can both obtain and afford. RNGR1 Check Amazon if interested.
 

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Our troops ate now wearing safety glasses in combat. If its working for them, don't you think it would work for you as we'll??
You'd like to think so, but no. In my experience the military has a whole lot of stupid going on in choices they make at times that I don't just consider because the military does something it's the best thing to do.
All the retarded PC rules they've got these days, still using FMJ, one of the worst camo patterns ever invented worn by the Army, over 40 years running a rifle system used by tons of lefthanded troops and they still haven't gotten around to putting ambi controls on it to name a few. There's also the acquired wisdom of what works for one doesn't mean it works for another. I prefer to look closely and understand my own situation and try things out that I think may work for it. Keep them if they do or trash them if they don't.


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The Military as a whole REQUIRES all troops wear ballistic eye protection when they go on a mission. As a matter of fact, if a trooper were to have an eye injury in indian country without his eye-pro, the whole chain of command will be standing before the man to answer why he wasn't wearing his armor in a threat area.

To qualify as ballistic eye protection for troops, the gear is tested by NATIC, and that which makes the cut is put on the Army Protective Eyewear List (APEL). This includes spectacles and goggles.

I carry a line of specs & goggles made by Revision, which is on the APEL, and has been for almost a decade now. Outstanding stuff.

Revision Ballistic Eye Protection
 

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I have been wearing the same pair of Oakley M-frames for years. Just replace the lenses every couple of years and the nose and eye pieces every couple of years. They have saved my eyes more than one time while shooting on steel during training.
 

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I have been wearing the same pair of Oakley M-frames for years. Just replace the lenses every couple of years and the nose and eye pieces every couple of years. They have saved my eyes more than one time while shooting on steel during training.
The Oakley M frame series are another great choice; but it looks like they were voluntarily removed from the APEL for some reason or other (other models have been kicked off the list by the Army, they mention several at the bottom of the linked poster). The brands / models on the list come and go over time, but I can attest to the protection power of the M-frame lenses... so I can see how they've actually deflected steel over the years.

Here's the current dope on what's good (and if it isn't on the poster, it isn't authorized for wear outside the gate, period)

Keep in mind that if you're shooting with SUNGLASSES, you're not wearing any armor for your eyes, and that what Mom used to say is true... they're all you get. Loose one, and it doesn't grow back like a lizard's tail does.

http://www.health.mil/Libraries/110...zed-Protective-Eyewear-List-poster-110620.pdf
 

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I usually go with an oversized pair of ANSI approved industrial safety jobs. They just fit over my glasses better.

That's actually another interesting point, they shield my eye but are also protecting my prescription eyewear from shells and such.

To deal with the discomfort of 2 pairs of arms pressing in the side of my head under my ear protection, I got custom ear molded plugs that are as good or better at decibel reduction than the muffs.

Maybe I am too cheap but, I am just unwilling to invest in prescription shooting glasses that I will have to change every couple of years with my prescription.
 

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Discussion Starter #16

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Eye protection is very important, is required overseas and is great for about 2 weeks until they get so scratched that they hinder you. The one is none saying doesn't work here more like 20 is 1. When I had new lenses I would always wear my oakleys on missions but that wouldn't last very long as they were constantly getting all scratched up making them useless. Sight is probably going to be the first sense to alert you to a threat and should be protected but when replacement lenses are not around eye pro becomes a liability and not an asset.
 

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Sweets, thanks for the Heads up on the Smith Optics glasses. I REALLY like the Aegis Echo, Im going to order a pair to try out. Once I get them I will update the actual fit with Helmet and Ear pro. NOW, I just have to find them in stock (Tan with all 3 lens')....
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Eye protection is very important, is required overseas and is great for about 2 weeks until they get so scratched that they hinder you. The one is none saying doesn't work here more like 20 is 1. When I had new lenses I would always wear my oakleys on missions but that wouldn't last very long as they were constantly getting all scratched up making them useless. Sight is probably going to be the first sense to alert you to a threat and should be protected but when replacement lenses are not around eye pro becomes a liability and not an asset.
Yeah that's the issue with all plastic lenses. I always buy tempered glass lenses for my eyeglasses- they never scratch. They should develop a ballistic lens that's glass coated on the outside at least. The good news is that it's easier to look after plastic lenses in civilian life, and that replacement lenses for the Aegis seem to run around $20 each.
 

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Yeah that's the issue with all plastic lenses. I always buy tempered glass lenses for my eyeglasses- they never scratch. They should develop a ballistic lens that's glass coated on the outside at least. The good news is that it's easier to look after plastic lenses in civilian life, and that replacement lenses for the Aegis seem to run around $20 each.
In regards to you comment about plastic lens being scratched easily. I agree most do scratch easily. However, I am issued prescription safety glasses at my work. I'm not certain what kind of plastic the lenses are made from, but these do not scratch very easily. Actually, unless they take a impact, they don't scratch. They are indeed plastic and not glass. The lenses are made by 3M, but I've no idea what exactly they are made from.
I usually get a new pair every year. I've one pair that's about 3 years old and hasn't a single scratch in the lens.
Granted, these glasses are much more expensive than your average safety or shooting glasses, but I think the same lens material would make for great shooting glasses. They would probably be more expensive, but I'd certainly be willing to pay more for glasses that had very good lenses in them.
 
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