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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After reading about projectile/case neck "cold welding" in I believe Precision shooting some years ago I've become much more aware that if a copper/copper alloy projectile is seated into a cartridge brass neck (copper-zinc alloy) then it is possible for the two to start to "stick" together thus making case neck tension and shot to shot variation high.
I have tried to minimize this by seating my match ammo "long" then a few days before the match I put them back into the seater die and seat them deeper to the desired OAL.
I have found this product the NECO "CARTRIDGE CASE NECK DRY LUBRICATION KIT" which is a kit with ball bearings inside a can with moly powder added. http://www.neconos.com/details.htm The idea is to put the case neck into the can and twist it so that moly plates inside the neck. You then fill the cases with powder and seat the projectile which does NOT have to be moly coated for this system to work if I understand it correctly. The moly is said to thus inhibit case neck "cold welding" and thus may be a candidate for ammo that is to be stored for a long time and for those hoping such ammo will perform after long term storage like it would after just a few days.
I would certainly like to just load ammo to final spec and not have to reseat projectiles as I often run TIR on loaded ammo and reseating means rerunning these measurements all over again to confirm TIR is less than or equal to max allowable for my own purposes. But I don't want any surprises after storage so I'm hoping someone else has used it.
Has anyone used this product? How did it work? What do you think of it?
 

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I've never used this stuff and wouldn't and I will explain why. I absolutely do not want moly anything going down my match grade barrel. I would have to believe that some of this moly would enter the barrel from the bullet. Moly when subjected to heat and pressure, will ruin a barrel. It's next to impossible to remove, even with a dental tool or similar tools. I know barrel manufactures like Rock Creek will void any warranty if moly is found inside. If I were you and I was concerned with cold welding, I would stick to the method you currently use. This is just my opinion on it.
 

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^^What slayer6769 said ^^

I ruined a Mini-14 barrel shooting Moly coated bullets.
 

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The neco kit is fine for lubing , prior to resizing. And I imagine it would minimize "cold welding".

But I can't believe any "cold welding" (corrosion?) would occur for months/years, if you take reasonable care of your loaded rounds.

Are you sure this is a problem for you? I would worry more about consistent neck tension, before I worried about cold welding. And most articles in Precision Shooter are aimed at rifles that are much more accurate than a Service Rifle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The neco kit is fine for lubing , prior to resizing. And I imagine it would minimize "cold welding".

But I can't believe any "cold welding" (corrosion?) would occur for months/years, if you take reasonable care of your loaded rounds.

Are you sure this is a problem for you? I would worry more about consistent neck tension, before I worried about cold welding. And most articles in Precision Shooter are aimed at rifles that are much more accurate than a Service Rifle.
Dave, If shot in about 1 year or less I have not worried about cold welding. But with the "prepper" emphasis now peaking I have started to think about going beyond 1 year and maybe into many years and that's why I started this thread.
When I have had "good lots" of components that work well together at times I've done winter reloading to get a lot of something that works very well in a particular firearm. It was on those large lots that went sometimes for 3-5 years that I DID notice some rounds that "popped" when getting seated to final OAL and that's when the Precision shooting article came to mind.
The Precision Shooting article did note that in the "old days" when surplus ammo was issued on-the-line at Perry that some took tong-tools and seated the projectiles deeper to improve ammo performance but I can't decide of that was breaking a tar seal or if cold-welding was in play.
Either way, on my own stuff, I found that even at the 5 year mark IF I final seated to get to my needed OAL the ballistics as proved over the chronograph remained at where I had set them initially.
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I agree that if one is not shooting at 600 yards or if one is in the marksman class working up then worries about cold-welding and such may be going overboard so I'm glad you brought that up so readers won't think this is a "must do" when they are starting out.
 

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What happened that ruined it?
before shooting moly coated bullets it was a 2"-3" rifle.

After shooting about 500 rnds of moly coated bullets it wouldn't shoot anything non-moly coated worth a crap. It was a 2"-3" rifle with moly, a 6"+ rifle with non-moly coated bullets after that.

Thought it was a good deal on the moly coated bullets. Drank the "Ooo!! a magic coating that will give me sub-moa" Koolaid.

Shoulda done my homework BEFORE, not after when the rifle shot like crap. Sold the rifle. I will never shoot even ONE moly coated bullet out of one of my rifles again.

YMMV
 
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