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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked up a stock as part of a trade and it's alot different than my other commercial M1a stocks. It's on the chubby side. I refurbished it with teak wood oil because it had nice grain and I think it's birch (but I would like the wood expert's weigh in). Is there a reason for the extra wood? Its extra thick all over compared to my other wood. Did a search but didn't find an exact answer. Would like to here what everyone thinks..
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During the last century, Shaw, Bishop, Fajen, etc all made commercial stocks for M14 pattern rifles. Since USGI wood was prone to warping, most of the match shooters wanted something heavier. There were some enormous models back then. I'll try dig up some pics.
 

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The wood stock on my Springfield Armory M1A underlever .22 pellet rifle is notably thicker through the fore-end than the GI walnut stock I have on my PolyTech. Maybe it was patterned after a "fat" M14 stock of this kind.
 

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Heavy stocks are preferred for highpower competition, as less prone to warping/more consistent. Match rules allow certain maximum dimensions and the heavy stocks maxed out those limits. Attached are some photos of a "standard" stock along with some "heavy" stocks.
 

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I like the heavier walnut stock such as the one you have. I tried several different ones when building my most recent rifle and found that the USGI match stocks that were set up for the rear lugs were just excessively fat for my taste and found a new Boyd's that had what is considered a medium contour with the selector cut out. I want to order another one like it but have found that they are now only currently available with that medium profile and no cutout like the one you have. If you decide you want to sell it; I would be interested.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Heavy stocks are preferred for highpower competition, as less prone to warping/more consistent. Match rules allow certain maximum dimensions and the heavy stocks maxed out those limits. Attached are some photos of a "standard" stock along with some "heavy" stocks.
Thanks for the pics. I really like the coating you have on the usgi profile stock
 

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I agree with Garandguy10. It's a Boyds walnut stock. IMHO, walnut stocks don't need stain. In fact, i strip all of my Boyds made finished stocks. Some of them have some really nice grain that the satin just hides. Usually the only time I will use stain on a walnut stock is to blend in any sapwood that is on the stock. If one wants that dark look of USGI stocks, one needs to add a couple of coats of Raw Linseed Oil, or Boiled Linseed Oil. They will will turn that dark reddish brown of aged military stocks. BLO just takes a little longer to do so. Teak oil won"t change color, or change much.
 

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Thanks for the pics. I really like the coating you have on the usgi profile stock

Thanks, but it's nothing special, just works for me. It's a brown-textured rattle can finish on a GI fiberglass stock that had a really horrible finish so really couldn't go wrong.
 

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