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79 IHC Scout II, 74 VW Bug class 11 look a like
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
OK this might sound a bit weird but hang with me.
I want to build a rifle with a heavy weight barrel that has the shoulder set back to work with a front lug that is sandwiched between the barrel and receiver and a special OP rod guide that will bolt to the bottom of the barrel channel, I want to full float the receiver and free float the barrel past the op rod guide. It might take a little reinforcement of the stock but that would be pretty easy. I am working on a Unlimited 50 cal target rifle that is similar but it is easy with a 75lb bolt gun.

Casey
 

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You don't say what type of action, but since you say op rod guide, I'm going to assume you're talking about an M14 type. I'm not sure what the goal is. Are you thinking that by bedding/fixing the barrel from the op rod guide to the receiver shoulder, and floating the receiver, and the front of the barrel (as it normally is), you will see greater accuracy than if the receiver is bedded into a rigid stock (along woith the barrel from the op rod guide back)? I'm thinking that the more rigid (assuming the barrel and receiver are blue printed and concentric/straight) you make the whole assembly, the greater the potential accuracy should be. Compared to other types of rifles, it seems as though an inherent weakness of the M14 design as far as accuracy goes, is the op rod acting against the barrel while cycling, and the fact that the barrel is by design, extremely thin from the gas cylinder shoulder forward. If those things cannot be altered, the stiffer the whole platform is from the gas cylinder shoulder back, the greater the potential accuracy (within the above mentioned limitations) of the gun would be.
 

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I'm hanging with you. Are you planning to buy a barrel blank and turn a unique profile? I would be inclined to silver solder the op rod guide rather than bolt it. Bolting would take a lot of space. You could cut two thirds of the rings that wrap around the barrel away from the gas cyl. then there would be no need to step the barrel down at the op rod. What is the overall goal?
 

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79 IHC Scout II, 74 VW Bug class 11 look a like
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Discussion Starter #4
MM
I'm talking about using the Op Rod guide as 1 of 2 mounting points, [the other being a front lug] as the only mounting point in the stock leaving the action and every thing forward the Op Rod guide floating. I would like to dovetail mount the gas cylinder to the barrel as well, that way I could have a barrel that is full diameter up to the flash hider. this would be a bench rest only rifle, I would like to get it under 1/2 MOA, shooting tight 1 ragged hole groups with a semi auto would be fun.

Casey
 

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Similar lug set ups have been done before so that's possible, but the M14 most likely will not give consistent accuracy with the receiver floated. Something has to anchor the rifle to the stock and the M14 design is such that it takes more than a secured lug to keep everything from shifting around. Remember you are working with a bunch of moving parts. Tubb was able to make a floated receiver work in a bolt gun, but it required a massive block that secured the barrel in the stock and there were no moving parts to deal with.

Still it may be an interesting experiment. Give it a try and let us know how it works out.
 
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