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Got my Berkey system today and got it up and running. Now I need to invest in some containers to store water in. I'd like some that are 1 gallon in size and that will fit in the fridge and then a few containers for longer term storage. I see all types for sale but not sure if one is better than the other. So, what brands do you guys use for water storage?

Merry Christmas to ALL
 

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Clean out your empty 1 gallon milk containers to store in the fridge. For larger use get some 5 gal. food grade buckets. Purchase spigots from your same Berky Dealer, and tap into the side of the bucket. Good for on the counter for washing hands/dishes, whatever. I purchased a water cooler(like you see at work) for my house some years ago. I keep on hand and rotate out 10 of those 5 gallon containers for the cooler. Yes there is a $5 deposit on these containers, but that price is cheap for a FG water container. All Food Grade containers can be IDed buy the number 2 in the triangle on the container. Do Not use any other containers. dozier
 

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Not Milk!!

I have read that Milk containers aren't good as you cannot remove the bacteria that seems into the plastic ans it will contaminate the water in time. Sorry Dozier..
Any HDPE (High Density Poly Ethilyne) will do fine. That is food grade plastic and should be marked on the bottom.

Nitro-Pac.com
 

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I use the 7 gallon Reliance Aquatainers for my H2O storage. They are nice because they are small enough to move in a B.O. scenario and can be stored in nooks and crannies where they'll fit. I also use some 1 gallon milk jugs that I store in my freezer so that in a power outage they supply more cold mass to keep my foodstuffs frozen longer.

There are also some 20-50 gallon containers available for H2O storage if you don't think that you'll be bugging out.

http://www.vtarmynavy.com/reliance-aqua-tainer---7-gallon.htm
 

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For 20+ years I have used the blue kerosene 5gal containers that are like the red gasoline containers. Reason is so I don't accidently try to put any fluids in them besides water.

HH
 

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I keep on hand and rotate out 10 of those 5 gallon containers for the cooler. Yes there is a $5 deposit on these containers, but that price is cheap for a FG water container. All Food Grade containers can be IDed buy the number 2 in the triangle on the container. Do Not use any other containers. dozier
I always maintain 3 of those in my storage for the "Hurricane Kit" that we Floridians are suggested to have ready during the season.

I intend on buying more for storage but have not gotten around to it, but this thread has acted as a reminder for me to get some more. GI2
 

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I have read that Milk containers aren't good as you cannot remove the bacteria that seems into the plastic ans it will contaminate the water in time. Sorry Dozier..
Any HDPE (High Density Poly Ethilyne) will do fine. That is food grade plastic and should be marked on the bottom.

Nitro-Pac.com
I've heard that with all the recycling efforts, some HDPE are made from recycled plastics that once carried hazardous/non-potable contents. Some of the contents leaches into the plastic and carry over in the new remanufactured container. The 2 within the triangle is suppose to denote that the container is made from new virgin/toxin free HDPE. Myself I'd rather be safe and use a container labeled that way. dozier
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Appreciate the responses.

I have been searching the internet and reading up on this. There seems to be a lot of different info concerning the safe reuse of plastic bottles. I found one site http://www.plasticsinfo.org/Functional-Nav/FAQs/Beverage-Bottles/default.aspx#1 that indicates that as long as PET/PETE #1 botttles are properly cleaned between use it is safe to refill them. Then I found an article on Trusted.MD http://trusted.md/blog/vreni_gurd/2007/03/29/plastic_water_bottles#axzz19F0RDCRf that states to only #2, 4 or 5 plastics and not use to refill any #1 bottles.

We had saved several of the Deer Park 3 liter bottles to keep water in the frig based on the one article but today I checked the Deer Park site and they say not to reuse any of their bottles.

I think I'm going to err of the side of caution and stick with the #2 grade. I found a company, CRS http://www.containerandpackaging.com/index.html, that sells bottles in the 1 gallon and 5 gallon range and up to 55 gallon drums.
 

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Round containers are the better choice as there's no corners for pressure to be against. Also, have to look at how some are made. If they are injection moulded they should be fine. But the ones that are pressed from a sheet of plastic have very weak corners.

HH
 

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there has been alot of controversy over the #2 inside the arrows as far as food and water storage. ive also read that that symbol only marks the type of plastic used as HDPE but the difference in food grade or not depends on the mold releasing agent used during the manufacturing process. utility buckets like those from home depot or lowes are cheaper because the toxic mold release agents used are cheaper. food grade is usually a buck or two more as the non-toxic mold release agents are more expensive. the only real way to tell is to buy something marked food grade by the FDA or contact the manufacturer to be sure.

i keep 6 or 7 of the water cooler type jugs as well. i got a $10 hand pump for them from Amazon. they stay in the closet in my office.

i also store tap water in cleaned out 2L soda bottles. they are essentially free and fit anywhere. i have 15 gallons, give or take, just under my living room sofa.

been thinking about using some 55 gallon barrels in the garage, or maybe just a pair of the 275 gallon totes with the galvanized steel cage around them for long term storage.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I had thought about the milk jugs for ice but assumed they were too thin to support freezing. I'll have to give that a try. How much space do you leave for the ice to expand?

Clean out your empty 1 gallon milk containers to store in the fridge. dozier
 

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I takes a while but 1 gal bleach bottles work well

Unlike milk jugs, old bleach bottels will not bring their own bacteria to the party. The taste is familiar if not pristine and they are fairly sturdy. I picked this up from my dad in the 50's and 60's when there were not a lot of alternatives.

Of course it takes a while to collect a few bleach bottles if all you are doing is laundry!
 

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If you want some serious long lasting containers fabricate them out of stainless steel sheeting.

HH
 

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I had thought about the milk jugs for ice but assumed they were too thin to support freezing. I'll have to give that a try. How much space do you leave for the ice to expand?
I've used milk jugs and the 1.75 liter soda bottles for freezing. The trick is to fill the bottle with about an inch left and to keep the cap loose till the contents is frozen. This gives the water room to expand. Thanks JOwen for the link on the containers. I did look at my 5 gallon "rental" water jugs today, and they are listed as a #7 in the triangle. On the bottle it states, "Bottle for use with water only". I'm starting to assume now that if a container originally held a liquid for drinking, it would be GTG for potable water later on. Since bleach is used for disinfection in smaller concentrations, a washed out bottle should be GTG also. Thanks for the OP, I thought previously that only #2 HDPE could be used. dozier
 

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I have found that the plastic one gallon containers that Arizona Iced Tea comes in, make excellent water containers. I have many rinsed out and stored just in case of emergency.
 

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Here is an excellent article on treating and storing drinking water: http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/emergency/water.html

I use milk jugs and one gallon orange juice jugs from Sam's. They are very sturdy. I rotate the water twice during the first year and once a year thereafter. Use a Sharpie to record the dates on the jug.

I clean and rotate the bottles during warm months so the excess water can be used on the lawn or on the plants. Its much easier to purge dish detergent from a bottle with a garden hose.
 

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We're talking survival here.

I've used the milk jugs with a few drops of chlorine bleach in them with water for years. Check them often and if you absolutely have to use the water it'll be better for needs other than drinking but it can be consumed if necessary. Just make sure you clean them well before filling them the first time. I'll admit that there are better ways but if you're on a super tight budget the careful use of milk jugs will get you by.
 

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Phil, you can go to the local farmers co-op and get 40+ gallon very heavy duty plastic barrels that once held olives. A couple of the ones that I have gotten still had a few olives in them. (I know you can get them at the Moulton farmers co-op for about $20 each.) They are a good deal and I need to get a couple more. I am going to set up a couple under my downspouts for watering my garden with a spigot for a hose added to the bottom.
 
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