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Discussion Starter #1
need help, is this normal when i use military brass reloads my m14 wont eject the spent case, but when i use comercial brass its no problem. . .?????
 

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Will the rounds chamber without any additional force? If so have to bump the op rod handle to chamber the round then you may not be adequately sizing your cases. If they do chamber easily, then are they loaded with sufficient powder charge to operate the gas system?

When they don't eject, are they extracting? Please give more detail about what you see.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
yes they chamber nicely no need force, . . ok i loaded 8 rounds of my reloads, i shot the first bullet, it extracted, shot the next one it didint extract, the op rod stayed put, had to force the case out, shot the whole magazine and after that i checked the rounds that extracted where only the comercial brass. . . is it normal, does military brass have a diffent expansion?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
and yes they had enuf powder, they where on the same batch i reloaded. . . tnx sir
 

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Military cases have thicker walls so, yes, given the same internal pressures, mil cases may expand "more".

If it were me, here is what I would do (there are many on here smarter than I am and may tell you something different):

1. First of all, check to make sure that your cases have been trimmed properly. A long case could cause the neck to stick.

2. Clean the chamber thoroughly. This means getting in there with a new/tight chamber brush, soaked in solvent, and polish it up good. Follow up by patching the chamber out clean and dry.

3. Remove your gas plug and clean up the piston and inside of the cylinder. If your piston has a lot of carbon on it, you can soak it in Hoppes #9 overnight and get most of it. KG-1 works really well and much faster. After your piston and cylinder are clean and dry, reinsert the piston and tighten the plug. After locking the bolt back, you should be able to tilt the rifle muzzle up and down and hear the piston sliding back and forth.

4. Check the dimensions of your sized military cases with a case gauge to make sure you're sizing them properly.

That's what I can think of for now. Hope it helps. Like I said, there are many on here with more experience and knowledge than I so some good info is inbound.
 

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Did you reload the Mil brass yourself, and if so, how did you size the cases?
 

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Mil brass is known to have less capacity than commercial brass. Having to force the handle back to extract sounds like over pressure. In the bolt action world this is a well known sign of excessive pressure. Are your primers getting flattened in your mil brass loads?
 

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The only thing I could add is you, if you don't already use one, might want to see about using a small base sizing die. I had the same problem with my SOCOM and the problem was resolved when I switched to a small base die.


Military cases have thicker walls so, yes, given the same internal pressures, mil cases may expand "more".

If it were me, here is what I would do (there are many on here smarter than I am and may tell you something different):

1. First of all, check to make sure that your cases have been trimmed properly. A long case could cause the neck to stick.

2. Clean the chamber thoroughly. This means getting in there with a new/tight chamber brush, soaked in solvent, and polish it up good. Follow up by patching the chamber out clean and dry.

3. Remove your gas plug and clean up the piston and inside of the cylinder. If your piston has a lot of carbon on it, you can soak it in Hoppes #9 overnight and get most of it. KG-1 works really well and much faster. After your piston and cylinder are clean and dry, reinsert the piston and tighten the plug. After locking the bolt back, you should be able to tilt the rifle muzzle up and down and hear the piston sliding back and forth.

4. Check the dimensions of your sized military cases with a case gauge to make sure you're sizing them properly.

That's what I can think of for now. Hope it helps. Like I said, there are many on here with more experience and knowledge than I so some good info is inbound.
 

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+1 on the Small Base Dies. Had the same problem with .223 years ago in a semi - small base dies are usually required for semi guns. At least that's my experience. Is your rifle chambered in 7.62 NATO or .308?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
i use lee deluxe dies, the primers are not that really flated. . but i think i forgot to -1 or -2 grs on mil brass. . my rifle is chamberd in .308. .
 

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You are at the top end of what I would consider is a safe load. Have you chronographed your muzzle velocities? If you have and if they are around 2750 fps then your chamber pressures are going to be upwards of 55,000 psi. At that kind of pressure you are probably starting to swell the base of the case a little and if that is true then you should think about using a small base resizing die since it resizes the case a couple of thousandths closer to the base.

Try your load recipe with some new, unfired brass. If they still stick then the problem is not your resizing procedure. The problem would then be either that the ammo is too hot or the weapon itself. You could then try a lighter load and some new unfired brass and if the problem goes away then it was too hot of a load, if it still exists then the problem is in the rifle.
 

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150 grains FMJ ball ammo, Vit N140 powder 44grs. . :0
That load sounds too hot for military cases. The Sako factory 150 grain 308 Winchester load uses 45.5 grains of VV N-140 in a Sako commercial case.

There are different "150 grain" FMJ bullets. The Hornady ones when loaded to the cannelure are deep in the case and have a short cartridge length which takes up powder capacity. The surplus ones are often from 30-06 which don't give much trouble or are Russian steel core which are very long bullets for the weight. A lot of commercial FMJ bullets have the cannelure far forward on the bullet. The Sierra ones may have the cannelure a but farther back.

I would say in a military 43.0 grains would be near max. Since you have trouble with one grain more I would down load even more though. Maybe use 42.5 grains as max and start with 42.0 grains and see how that works.
 

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That Load is way TOO HOT for a Military Case using N-140, start with 39grs and work up,Your Primers are bound to be Flat, using 44grs of N-140!GI3
 

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Here is the service rifle load data from the Hornady #7 manual in an M1A using commercial Hornady/Winchester type cases, not military cases. Using the 155 Hornady A-Max bullet and Winchester LR primers.

155 Hornady A-Max Vihtavuori VV-N140 37.6 2200
155 Hornady A-Max Vihtavuori VV-N140 39.0 2300
155 Hornady A-Max Vihtavuori VV-N140 40.4 2400
155 Hornady A-Max Vihtavuori VV-N140 41.8 2500
155 Hornady A-Max Vihtavuori VV-N140 43.2 2600
155 Hornady A-Max Vihtavuori VV-N140 44.6 2700 Remarks: maximum load
 
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