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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have always enjoyed making my own special recipe for fresh butter, and this morning while I was looking for a new recipe, I came across this.

Evidently if you get Brand X el cheapo butter, you can CAN IT and it will last for several years they said. It also does not melt, and does not need to be refrigerated.

My parents canned fig preserves, but that is about all of the canning experience I have used in my life. Once I get a house I will definately try this little experiment.

HH, have you heard of this before? It does not look like there is much to it except doing things at the exact moment it is needed.

Kinda like baby sitting to get softshell crabs and moving them from one tank to the other every two hours or so.

Well, anyway, here is the instructions for any that wish to try.
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UPDATE: Those in the know, have said this process may be unsafe and dangerous. THIS IS FOR ENTERTAINMENT and DISCUSSION PURPOSES ONLY....RNS, the OP

Leslie

April 5, 2010 at 4:48 pm

That’s amazing. It doesn’t look that hard! I wanted to share something with you that someone emailed me a while ago. Who knew you could can butter!?!

1. Use any butter that is on sale. Lesser quality butter requires more
shaking (see #5 below), but the results are the same as with the expensive brands.
2. Heat pint jars in a 250 degree oven for 20 minutes, without rings
or seals. One pound of butter slightly more than fills one pint jar, so if you melt 11 pounds of butter, heat 12 pint jars. A roasting pan works
well for holding the pint jars while in the oven. I use ½ pint jars
for this too.
3. While the jars are heating, melt butter slowly until it comes to a
slow boil. Using a large spatula, stir the bottom of the pot often to keep the butter from scorching. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes at
least: a good simmer time will lessen the amount of shaking required (see #5 below). Place the lids in a small pot and bring to a boil, leaving the lids in simmering water until needed. About 3-5 min.
4. Stirring the melted butter from the bottom to the top with a soup
ladle or small pot with a handle, pour the melted butter carefully into heated jars through a canning jar funnel. Leave 3/4″ of head space in the jar, which allows room for the shaking process.
5. Carefully wipe off the top of the jars, then get a hot lid from the
simmering water, add the lid and ring and tighten securely. Lids will seal as they cool. Once a few lids “ping,” shake while the jars are still warm, but cool enough to handle easily, because the butter will separate and become foamy on top and white on the bottom. In a few minutes, shake again, and repeat until the butter retains the same consistency throughout the jar.
6. At this point, while still slightly warm, put the jars into a
refrigerator. While cooling and hardening, shake again, and the melted butter will then look like butter and become firm. This final shaking is very important! Check every 5 minutes and give the jars a little shake until they are hardened in the jar! Leave in the refrigerator for an hour.
7. Canned butter should store for 3 years or longer on a cool, dark
shelf. [It does last a long time. We have just used up the last of the
butter we canned in 1999, and it was fine after 5 years.] Canned butter does not “melt” again when opened, so it does not need to be refrigerated upon opening, provided it is used within a reasonable length of time.
 

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I'm sure Hunting Hawk will have something to say about this, but it's probably best to pressure can butter as opposed to the method described. Youtube videos I've watched mention that the US government discourages the canning of butter due to the danger of botulism contamination. One such video dismisses that as dairy lobby propaganda and says pressure canning (at 230 degrees) is safe, but no matter who's talking when you say 'botulism' I pay attention, especially if it's a possibility in something like butter that won't be heated up to boiling temperatures before eating.
 

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I think this is a very dangerous short cut for the way it is safely done. Posted process doesn't even clarify the butter before canning. Just me, but I wouldn't even consider such a process.

Here is the youtube method of clarifying & then pressure canning:
[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QcV3aXTqKvg[/ame]

I know you can freeze unsalted butter for atleast six months & pull it out & can't tell it was frozen. Long term, I have elected to purchase powdered butter. And you can purchase canned butter. Hey, you have the same choices with milk.

I'm just saying better safe then sorry & I just don't believe the method in the OP is safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks, HH. Would it be better to just bring this thread down, or leave it up as educational as what NOT to do.

I was hoping for your input, HH.
 

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One compromise would be to put the butter in jars and then freeze them. Then if the power gets lost, you could eat them up pretty quickly and minimize risks, or if time goes by, use them for frying etc. Especially with salted butter, I could see the repackaged frozen product lasting for 5 years.

Unsalted butter is pretty delicate stuff, BTW- unless clairified and pressure canned, I would avoid it for long term purposes.
 

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After extensive research I decided purchasing from Honeyville Farms was the way to go. I purchased a can each of their powdered butter & powdered whole eggs. I made pan bread with the addition of powdered milk from the store. Then mixed the powdered butter per instructions for ontop of the bread. Not as good as making everything with fresh ingredients but plenty good enough for camping or SHTF.

Powdered & freeze dried stuff for me is long term. I have the advantage of solar powered chest freezer. So I can freeze unsalted butter & whole milk which are both great for short term. I also keep a poun of butter & 1/2 gallon whole milk in the house freezer.
When I buy fresh butter or milk it goes into the chest freezer. At the same time I take some out of the chest freezer & into the house frig freezer. And pull from the house frig freezer & put into the frig so constantly rotating stock.
 

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I buy 5-gal lots of high quality olive oil from Greece, a friend owns the orchard.


It stores fine in a cool dark place in original metal can.
Yes, it's supposed to be one of the best oils to store longterm. Didn't find that out until recently- wish it was cheaper nowadays.
 
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