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I just tried one of the OLD/original Devine M1A rifles in our new alloy EBR stock bedding.
TIGHT!!!!

That old ALL GI Devine had an H&R trigger group, with the original trigger pull. Nice trigger ... obviously been worked on.

Racking the op rod on that rifle was indeed a near "Devine" experience.
The bolt cams the hammer back so SMMMMMmooooothhhhhly,
you almost wonder if the hammer is even in there.

Quite a difference from the usual Polytechs and Norincos I generally play with,

This Devine was in a US GI fiberglass stock,
??which I don't think was original???,
and was a bit light on trigger guard tension in the GI stock,
but otherwise what a sweetie!!!!

PS: The owner of this Devine has had it since he was a student at Colorado Gunsmithing School, back in the 70s???
I wonder if many other Canadian owned Devines are out there?
[;)
 

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My version was made by a follower of Chairman Mao and I've seen few US made ones of any kind since the Chicoms made them available for so little. One hears these great stories though.
 

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IMHO any modifying of a Devine rifle makes no sense. I know it's the owners rifle and I respect it's his to do as he wants. But it still makes no sense.
I could be wrong here but I believe Elmer did send rifles out of his place in G.I. synthetic stocks also. I know he had his own standard grade rifles and his own versions of National Match grade rifles.
The value of a Devine rifle comes when it's as close to it's original state as can be.

Note; A lot of people confuse a rifle built on a Devine receiver as being the same thing as a Devine rifle. I've seen more than one Devine rifle loose about 50% of it's value because the owner shot out the original barrel and had it replaced.
 
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