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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dang, I was stripping my stock earlier with acetone to remove the USGI finish from Canadian Arsenals, LTD. I don't know how I missed it before. I noticed it once the acetone soaked towels weren't turning up brownish orange anymore. It doesn't seem to be a severe crack, but thats just my guess. Is this crack something to be worried about if Im going to be using this stock often? Is it repairable? And if so, who would be the best person or company to send it out to for service? Any help would be greatly appreciated.



 

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The pistol grip is notched into the stock. A wooden dowel goes thru the pistol grip from top to bottom. Cracks in this area are not as bad as they seem. As long as the dowel rod is intact the grip is structurally sound. Use Acra glass or another wood friendly epoxy. If concerned about the appearance use some shellac at the surface and sand over it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Would I have to enlarge the crack on my pistol grip as well? I wouldn't say I'm too confident to take on a task like that. I barely even want to take sandpaper to my stock. The dowel rod is all intact and that was the only area with a crack that I noticed. Im going to apply several more coats of acetone to get a completely clean birch patina, so I'll be sure to inspect everything just in case I missed another crack. Appearance isn't going to be much of a problem as long as I can get the crack filled and forgot about. Time to research into acra glass use.
 

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EmmAeiVee, try to twist the grip to see if the dowel is broke. I could not get the crack on my stock to open or close, I tried to close it with a clamp, the crack would not open or close ;;; so the dowel is still good .
I enlarged the crack with a box cutter and some small dremels bits, the dremel bit I used in my hand, I did not fell comfortable in using them in the dremel itself.
 

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I sure wouldn't enlarge the crack.

What CNelson suggested sounds like a good idea to me. I use 3M extra fine sanding sponges for stock work. They're 180/220 grit IIRC. I cannot for the life of me use paper and not leave lines. The sponge is much easier for me to keep in good contact with the stock. I also usually only wet sand on stocks that really don't need sanding otherwise.

I might be apt to sparing apply some wood glue to the crack, work it in with flat toothpicks, wipe off any gross excess, apply compression while drying and see if I couldn't get the crack to almost disappear. Especially if merely cosmetic. I wouldn't want to see the crack opening up while manipulating the rifle. That would bother me. I'm not advocating my method to you, but I like to try stuff. Sometimes this results in a calamity. Much less often I hit the jackpot. Such as life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I held onto the pistol grip and twisted it in multiple directions to see if the crack would enlarge or flex in anyway. Thankfully it didn't so it's not the dowel itself. Im going to research using acraglass since it was suggested. I remember stumbling across something about using wood glue to fill and fix the crack but I didn't keep the page open on my browser. IIRC, they said that the wood glue will actually become a stronger bond once it sets. But I could just be making that up as I go along with it. I definitely don't want to the crack to get any bigger than it already is while firing the rifle, especially since you can see the hairline of the crack continue further along the pistol grip. I don't want the stock to become a garage queen, I kind of live by the saying, "don't stock em, rock em." And in regards to not wanting to use sandpaper, Im in the same boat as you. I just couldn't find any of the 3M sanding sponges at my local Lowes, and the associates weren't much of help either.
 

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EmmAeiVee,
You can also try to get the glue in the crack with pushing the glue in with dental floss .
Just try not to get the floss caught in the crack. I would stick with regular wood glue, all the poly glues expand when drying.
Good luck,
Tony
 

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Ace Hardware stores sell equivalent sanding sponges. Might also get away with 0000 steel wool to remove any surface glue residue.
 

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When I brought up a similar issue, someone posted that Brownells sells a special superglue stuff to repair such cracks in gun stocks. Then, when I called Brownells, the lady looked it up and said that they couldn't ship it. And this was even before I finally realised that Brownells weren't much of an asset to my shooting life and never will be. But anyway, Brownells has that stuff, all you have to do is get it. I guess.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I doubt floss would even be able to get wood glue in the crack since its actually quite thin. Maybe ill be able to fill it by just applying some pressure on the application point then just let it set. But thats only an idear for right now until I search around a bit more. Thanks for the input y'all.
 

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PL Professional Wood Filler is tough stuff. I wouldn't hesitate to use it on something like this. I'd just press it in, mound it up a bit, and blend it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I never updated this post, so I thought I would anyways just in case someone was looking for a solution to similar situation like mine. I was able to fill the crack using Hot Stuff CA Glue, the viscosity of it is like water. I just added a few layers until the hairline crack didn't absorb anymore and let it dry for several minutes. Since Im still in the process of refinishing the stock. The area that had the overflow of dried glue along with the rest of the stock was dry sanded and smoothed up to 220 grit. I didn't take any close up photos, but I post a picture of the stock once I wiped off the slurry after the 220 wet sand. You can still see the line of the crack, but its a smooth surface and you wouldn't even been able to tell it was cracked in that area. It was also able to take the stain and oil without a problem. The only exception is the fact that the area where the glue was applied is shiny. That might be a problem for those with a usgi type finish.

 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
as requested. you can get the glue directly from satellite city at caglue.com they also have a thicker viscosity of glues for filling gaps and voids which iirc might suit your crack a lot better. you can obviously see the line from where the crack was. but it would probably go unnoticed since there other lines that look similar to it around the pistol grip. i also want to add that the stock is currently covered in a slurry from wet sanding. i got an angle with the light on the crack so you can see its a smooth surface.





 

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There's nobody better than Rick Borecky (RickB on CMP and Jouster boards), but I'm noyt sure you need him.
Isn't he rickb here as well
 
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