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Discussion Starter #1
Working through a decision and looking for some input from others.

I was planning on using a Redding Type S Full Length Bushing Die to reload for my M1A NM. However, after calling and talking with the Redding technicians yesterday, they indicated that they did not recommend the use of that die for gas guns due to only sizing 85% of the neck with the bushing.

Does anyone have any experience with using this die to reload for the M1A and how did it work for you.

Thanks............
 

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I have been using the Redding Type S Bushing die. I bought the Type S Match Die Set # 36155. That came with the bushing die and bullet seater.
I have over 1500 reloads through my Socom 16 with out any FTF's and one FTE(it helps if there is powder in the case). Here is a picture of the neck of a twice reloaded GGG case.



You can see where the bushing does not come completely down to the curve of the shoulder. But it it still reduces the diameter of the neck from my fired cases.
I like being able to play with neck tension and using larger sized bushings when rounding necks of bulk shipped brass.

I hope this helps,
Glenn
 

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I just bought the set, and I'd be curious too. I have yet to load anything with it.
 

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The only thing I did to my benchrest Redding type S die is add a carbide neck expanding button to ensure the neck ID is consistant without the hassle of turning the necks to a uniform thickness beforehand. If the bushing sizes a little too much on a particular case, the expander button sorts it on the downstroke of the ram. If the case neck is too thin, then there will be no resistance on the down stroke, and you know to remove that case from the current run, as the bullet may not be held tightly enough for proper function in a semi auto. (Don't pitch it, just save the case for a batch that requires a smaller bushing!)

Very nice system that doesn't overwork the brass.

One tends to end up with several .308 die sets, for various jobs and weapons, and brass. A body die works well in conjunction with the bushing die. The cases MUST chamber easily in semi autos. It's not like a bolt rifle that can accept fairly tight rounds.
 

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I agree with jmoore. When I was shooting my M1A in HP competition, I fired somewhere around 6k rounds sized with the Redding bushing die with an expander plug never once having a feeding problem associated with case sizes. Most cases, especially LC or WRA (ones I had experience with), will have inconsistent neck thicknesses. Since having the internal area "round" is more important than the outside of the neck, you do want to use an expander ball. Having the neck bushing just meant that I didn't have to work the neck as hard.
 

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I have the S Die also, but haven't bought any bushings for it yet. What sizes do you use and for what purpose? I am looking for a diameter that will not require an expander ball to be dragged through.

Thanks.
- Ivan.
 

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I have the S Die also, but haven't bought any bushings for it yet. What sizes do you use and for what purpose? I am looking for a diameter that will not require an expander ball to be dragged through.

Thanks.
- Ivan.
I have the Titanium Nitride Bushings from size .332" up to .337". These are the high end bushings. I also have the carbide size button jmoore mentioned. I use the .336" bushing to just round out necks that have been damaged in shipping on my Scharch's IVI new brass. The FC NATO "pulled" brass with primers(new) I use the .334" bushing to make up for bullet seating expansion. And depending on the wall thickness after being fired(multiple times) I use a .333" or .332" bushing. Now I only use Military grade brass. From my research(and I may be wrong) non-bushing dies neck size is .330" for .308 dies and is made for commercial grade brass. The reason I use the .333" or .332" bushing is on military grade brass is the neck wall is .001-.0015" thicker. This keeps me from over working the necks.

I hope this helps.
Glenn
 

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Discussion Starter #8
That's great to hear that there are no feed issues with this die.

However, what is the accuracy like using a bushing die?

Thanks
 

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Have used bushing dies fo several years with no problems nice because
when loading commerical brass you can set you neck tension....
 

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... (W)hat is the accuracy like using a bushing die?

Thanks
About the same or somewhat better, depending on the brass. The main advantages for me are longer case life, less trimming, and less effort on both the downstroke AND upstroke of the press handle. In a bolt gun, the accuracy advantages are more clearcut.
 

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Techs at redding indicated to me that going with a bushing die with surplus brass wasn't going to pay any dividends. I've never had any difficulty getting 1MoA results using standard dies and a decent bullet with my match rifle.
 

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That's great to hear that there are no feed issues with this die.

However, what is the accuracy like using a bushing die?

Thanks
I have only used bushing dies for reloading .308, so I can not compare it to regular .308 dies.
As far as I am concerned. Once I find the load my Socom shoots best, the operator is the only hindrance to consistancy.(Hey wait that's me!)

Glenn
 
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