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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello internet,

Quite possibly a stupid question. But, since I don't actually know any of you, that's ok.

Bought some once-fired brass from a place called USA Brass Company. It's sold as "fully processed," meaning that it has been sized, swaged, & trimmed. I went ahead and resized it (with an RCBS full size die), just to be safe.

Had something happen that's never really happened before (although, I'm no RAMMAC ;) ). I seat the first bullet, and it's not budging. Meaning there's practically no travel with the ram unless I give it a ton of force. I take it out and notice that there is a relatively severe rim of "burr;" I don't know how else to explain it. So I take out my trusty Lee deburrer, give it a few turns, and try to seat the bullet again. Little more travel this time, but still ridiculous.

I start to think that the mouth is magically shrunken now. I take the calipers to it; doesn't seem like the case. I start really turning my little deburring tool on it, clean with wire brush, and try to seat the bullet again. Getting much better. Multiple more cases end up doing this. I start to think I need a heavy duty deburring tool, as if the process they used at their factory to trim did a serious number on the rim of the cases.

So maybe I haven't even really asked a question. Here's one: Does this make sense?
 

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I'm a full blown newbie, but when I resized my 1F brass with the lee f/l resizer, I was getting burs every time I pressed in a bullet (after deburring). I bought myself a Lee universal expanding die, and have been burr free since. I figure loosing random chunks of brass off something that spins fairly fast can't be a good thing as far as consistency and accuracy goes...my newbie 2 cents. I also use a factory crimp on my loads after.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm a full blown newbie, but when I resized my 1F brass with the lee f/l resizer, I was getting burs every time I pressed in a bullet (after deburring). I bought myself a Lee universal expanding die, and have been burr free since. I figure loosing random chunks of brass off something that spins fairly fast can't be a good thing as far as consistency and accuracy goes...my newbie 2 cents. I also use a factory crimp on my loads after.
Thanks, this is helpful. So when you size these particular cases, are you first running them through the full length resizer and then through the universal expander? Or are you only using the expander?
 

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Have you checked the diameter of the expander ball on your original die? Your problem does make sense, it has happened to a lot of people, but there is no one single solution. I once had a customer that was trying to load 8mm (.323) bullets into a 3006 case. Another guy had .243 cases formed from military .308 cases. Hope you get it all straightened out. dave
 

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Did you chamfer the case mouth (inside and outside) after you resized them?

When brass it trimmed it leaves a very sharp corner (inside and outside) on the case mouth that needs to be removed with a chamfer tool (I've used one from RCBS for many years).

New brass (meaning once fired) also has a pretty sharp corner. If I have once fired brass I also chamfer the case mouth on it prior to reloading.

In my experience this only needs to be done after resizing or with once fired brass. The effects of the chamfer will last till you trim the brass.

Not suggesting you buy from anyone, just an example of what I've used for many years.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/46...ng-tool-17-to-60-caliber?cm_vc=ProductFinding
 

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Probably their machinery is becoming worn, especially the expander ball. Therefore the neck ID is too small to take a projectile with acceptable force.

Send it back.
 

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When YOU resized it AGAIN, did you use a die with the expander ball intact, or not?
If you didn't, that's your problem.
 

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Try brushing the inside of the neck with a bristle brush that's been dusted with powdered moly or graphite. That will usually ease seating pressure and make it more uniform. Sometimes those "processed" cases have been cleaned with an acid or other cleaner that leaves the neck squeaky clean, maybe too squeaky.

Ray
 

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Thanks, this is helpful. So when you size these particular cases, are you first running them through the full length resizer and then through the universal expander? Or are you only using the expander?
I run it through the full length resizer, trim, deburr/chamfer and then put them through the universal expander.
 

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IMHO, and without actually seeing what's going on, you may need to expand the case neck before you can seat a bullet. That will require you to buy additional equipment - something like this:K&M, or this: Sinclair. It may also create additional problems with the case neck being too large then to hold the bullet tightly. Not much of a problem with a bolt gun, but a potentially serious problem with a gas gun. No point really in buying one of those tools unless you plan to start turning case necks. I think Hammonjoe has the right idea - send the brass back for a refund.
 

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I bought 1000 LC LR once fired brass two years ago that had a very tough rim on the case mouth. I ended up trimming the cases down below minimum at 1.998" to cut that rim off.

I originally tried chamfering the mouths, but that too was very difficult to do and wasn't particularly accurate. Followed the chamfer with deburring that was futile and I finally resorted to just trimming them short.

Most cases had the rim removed at 1.998", but a few still had enough of a rim left to make bullet seating iffy with case mouth splits and poor seating. These were discarded.

Most cases, 95% or so, worked out OK. After the first reload, most cases stretched out into the acceptable range where normally trimming removed the residual rim. I got at least 5 reloads out of most of these cases, so while they were difficult to work with initially, I got my money's worth out of them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
1KPerDay said:
When YOU resized it AGAIN, did you use a die with the expander ball intact, or not?
If you didn't, that's your problem.
Ha - yes. Yes, it was intact. Gotta consider all options though, so thanks for the response.

Have you tried a VLD chamfer tool?
Just picked one up tonight, going to give it a try tomorrow.

4Quangs said:
I bought 1000 LC LR once fired brass two years ago that had a very tough rim on the case mouth. I ended up trimming the cases down below minimum at 1.998" to cut that rim off.

I originally tried chamfering the mouths, but that too was very difficult to do and wasn't particularly accurate. Followed the chamfer with deburring that was futile and I finally resorted to just trimming them short.

Most cases had the rim removed at 1.998", but a few still had enough of a rim left to make bullet seating iffy with case mouth splits and poor seating. These were discarded.

Most cases, 95% or so, worked out OK. After the first reload, most cases stretched out into the acceptable range where normally trimming removed the residual rim. I got at least 5 reloads out of most of these cases, so while they were difficult to work with initially, I got my money's worth out of them.
This is great info, and is probably what I'll do if the Lyman tool doesn't cut it.

Take care.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
noob14s said:
Have you tried a VLD chamfer tool?
I'm just updating this for the purpose of helping anyone else who searches for this same issue down the road.

Thanks again noob for this suggestion. The Lyman VLD tool is excellent, and was the best way to clean up the harsh burring (or really more like ridging) from this processed brass's dull trimming from the manufacturer. The VLD tool has a very sturdy and extremely sharp cutting face. And with the slimmer profile it also seems to also just work better at taking off the most amount of metal with the least amount of effort.

So my process now with the rest of this brass will be to first get rid of the extreme burring prior to even resizing, as then I will get less pressure on both the up and down strokes of my press from the expander ball.

I'm excited about picking out the LC brass from this mixed bag. Time to get to work.
 

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I have this same brass. The necks as received were too tight. I resize all if them and use the expander ball which brings the neck back to proper size. I also use the Lyman VLD to chamfer inside of neck. All bullets seat nicely. Good luck to you as well


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Sure sounds like their de-burring tool is dull .... very dull.


Your problem certainly sounds like a job for some sort of powered tool...

I rigged up a corded variable powered drill to help with similar problem I had.. Zip tied the drills trigger at a low-moderate speed ( a higher speed then most bench multi de-burring type tools) and I can fully depress the trigger to slide the zip tie off it ... mounted the drill onto a piece of plywood with oversized hose clamps with rags as a cushion between the drill and hose clamps.....and then clamped it on to a bench.

The drills chuck can hold all sorts of gizmos.... and frankly a drill press , adjusted for specific depth would be perfect.

Cost was about 30 bucks. Cheaper if you buy a garage sale variable speed drill.

That drill has come in handy for 15+ years....

Just a thought. You would want to figure out a way to minimize the depth of your cutting.... Frankly a tapered hole in a piece of wood might work.

PSA , my gizmo is in no way OHSA approved.... Lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I have this same brass. The necks as received were too tight. I resize all if them and use the expander ball which brings the neck back to proper size. I also use the Lyman VLD to chamfer inside of neck. All bullets seat nicely. Good luck to you as well
Nice, thanks. And good to know I wasn't going crazy initially.

The VLD tool was a great one to add to my reloading toolbox. Once the extreme burring was removed, this brass has actually been very serviceable and I'd say I'd definitely recommend it. Primer pockets were reamed very well, haven't had any trouble with the pockets. Pretty happy at this point.

Good luck to you as well.
 
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