M14 Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have my first M14 coming, and would like to buy some ammo for it and then go to reloading it as I shoot it. Any recommendations? Maybe some inexpensive ball for practice and a recommendation for something to hunt coyotes with. (light bullets?)

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,263 Posts
The Prvi Partizan ammo should be fine. I use their Yugoslavian 8mm Mauser surplus in my 98k. I get the occasional dud, or I have to strike it twice sometimes, but the stuff's been boxed up since the 1950s anyways.

Before you guys get mad at me, I clean my Mauser very thoroughly immediately after shooting. At $.22/rnd, it's worth it...

Problem is you may not be able to reload the casings. I haven't tried yet since I'm waiting till I move to set up my reloading kit, but I heard some of these European casings are Berdan primed (and based on the description mine are), which means you may have trouble punching out the old primers.

Experienced reloaders, this is your cue...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,279 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
Although the steel in the bullets is softer than the steel in the barrel, ramming a piece of steel down a rifled steel barrel at twice the speed of sound, can;t be good for it. I stick to copper and lead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
Although the steel in the bullets is softer than the steel in the barrel, ramming a piece of steel down a rifled steel barrel at twice the speed of sound, can;t be good for it. I stick to copper and lead.
steel "core" does NOT come in contact with barrel at any time during its travel thru any barrel,hence steel "core". it is still encased in lead and copper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,408 Posts
Problem is you may not be able to reload the casings. I haven't tried yet since I'm waiting till I move to set up my reloading kit, but I heard some of these European casings are Berdan primed (and based on the description mine are), which means you may have trouble punching out the old primers.

Experienced reloaders, this is your cue...

There are a lot more issues with Berdan primers. The size of the primers are different than others so you would have to replace them with new Berdan primers. If you find them they will be more expensive.
In case some people don't already know. The cases are designed differently. A standard case is de-primed by passing a pin thru the flash hole in the center of the primer pocket pushing the spent primer out.
On a Berdan case there isn't a single flash hole in the middle of the primer pocket. There are two smaller flash holes off set from the center of the pocket. No good way to line up the case to pass two pins thru those holes so you have to de-prime those cases via other means. In either case it is time consuming and/or very messy.
Unfortunately for me I'm old enough to remember a time when it could make sense to reload Berdan cases because supplies of the primers were available and cheap then. Most people gave up the practice before it stopped making economic sense because it wasn't worth the time and trouble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,901 Posts
if a magnet sticks to it, leave it alone.
Although the steel in the bullets is softer than the steel in the barrel, ramming a piece of steel down a rifled steel barrel at twice the speed of sound, can;t be good for it. I stick to copper and lead.
Ok. lets get to the facts.
As others have said,"magnetic bullet" are steel core. Here is a picture of two Winchester 147gr FMJBT bullets. One with an exposed core.



The lands of your rifle barrel will never make contact with the steel core. So they will not damage the barrel.

The problem with steel core projectiles is that some places will not let you shoot them. There is a potential fire hazard with these bullets. In dry areas, if these bullets contact hard rocks they will produce a shower of sparks. Possibly igniting something. So that should be considered.

Addition; I also want to add a picture of a cupronickel cartridge. German DAG 7.62x51 NATO.



Although silver in color it is not a steel covering. It is steel core and that's where the confusion comes from.
The jacket is a mix of copper, nickel, and manganese. It just takes on the color of the nickel. But it is safe to shoot.

To the OP,
PMC Bronze 147gr. bullets are inexpensive, well made and reloadable. Lighter bullets for varmints, I will yield that to others.

I hope this helps,
Glenn

P.S. Stainless1911 you owe me $0.04 for cutting into this bullet.GI1
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top