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http://www.browning.com/products/catalog/firearms/detail.asp?fid=014B&cid=013&tid=275&bg=x

Every once in a while I see a firearm that fulfills my every need and desire in its field, sort of like Barbara Eden, only louder when squeezed, and made of steel. This weekend I innocently picked up Browning's new synthetic stocked all weather over and under as above and it happened again... I love double barrels and they love me but they are worrisome to take out hunting in the rain, since you can't tell what's happening inside [unless you've paid a fortune for sidelocks, in which case I resent you], but this gun is the answer... for only $2.5K or so I can wander in hot and cold downpours and in wet snow storms, and salt fog, and freezing rain, confident that even if I stumble, drown, freeze, and die, my family will get back an undamaged firearm....

But seriously, this is a great gun. It has available 26" barrels, an adjustable comb and- unlike every DBBL barrel I know- also has adjustable chokes. How can I refuse? Why should I? Who owns one? Tell me about it!
 

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It's looking like there is no one to love this gun but me. I will keep things private if the relationship ever comes to fruition. RNGR2
 

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Maybe I missed something, why is the MSRP $2800?
 

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Maybe I missed something, why is the MSRP $2800?
Cutting edge materials science and the shop work that goes into regulating a superposed double gun will do that to the price. As will the name "Browning."
 
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There ain't no good cheap double guns, except for some coach guns that are only good for shooting things the size of coaches. So doubles aren't popular, so the price goes up, making them less popular. And so it goes.
 

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You'll have to forgive me. About the only shotguns I keep up with are tactical ones, not sporting ones. Regardless of my ingorance of double guns, FNH owns Browning so I'm sure the Cynergy Feather Composite is peerless. GI2 If you do get one Sweets, please post some pictures.
 

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You'll have to forgive me. About the only shotguns I keep up with are tactical ones, not sporting ones. Regardless of my ingorance of double guns, FNH owns Browning so I'm sure the Cynergy Feather Composite is peerless. GI2 If you do get one Sweets, please post some pictures.
I suspect that, like some of the other finer things in life, doubles are something you acquire a taste for if you've been bad in a past life. GI1
 
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I don't know. I've got a Savage Fox BSE that my father bought on the occasion of my birth. It's by no means anything other than a workingman's gun, but of every firearm I own, it's still my favorite. And I own many firearms that are significantly more valuable.

There's something about a double gun.
 
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They're one of the safest guns, carry easily, point fast, shoot fast, and you get an instant choice of two different chokes. But there IS something more as well....
 

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I don't own any of the Cynergy models, but I do have a few of the earlier Browning break-open guns.



From the left, that's a Lightning 20 ga., a field grade Citori, a Special Sporting Clays Citori, and a BT-99 Plus trap gun with built-in shock absorber in the stock
(For some reason, the strobe lighting used in this picture caused that appearance of striped discoloration in the rear stocks. The guns don't look like that under any other light.)

The three 12 ga. guns have all seen their share of rain and bad weather. The trap gun has probably seen the worse since large trap tournaments can't be rescheduled and will continue even in the worst weather (unless there is lightning). I remember shooting in a state tournament once when it was raining so hard that the clay birds would hardly fly 50 feet before being driven into the ground. I literally had to pour water out of the bore and action when I got back to the clubhouse. Obviously some serious drying and oiling was in order but that was all I did and I've never seen any signs of rust or damage. The only damage from weather came on the field gun after spending 24 hours in a gun case that had leaked and left the barrels sitting in wet wool. It got some slight roughness on the blueing on the lower barrel.

I'm lucky enough to be the 'average' size person that the guns are made to fit. They seem like they were custom made for me. The trap gun has adjustable everything, but trap shooting is different than most anything else when it comes to a good fit for that type of shooting. That's an after-market heel adjustment fixture on the trap gun; everything else is stock except for the titanium Briley choke tubes you see sticking out of the barrels. The older field gun has the original Invector choke tubes while the newer guns all have the longer Invector Plus chokes.

Despite heavy use from many years of competition and constant practice, I have spent a grand total of $10 in repairs on these guns (including three others that I sold or traded). After probably 200,000+ rounds, the trap gun needed a small replacement part in the ejector system - a weld broke, not the part itself. The blueing under the receiver is almost completely gone just from the wear of using and carrying the gun around with sweaty hands in the Texas heat. The action is getting loose from all that use and could probably stand some adjustment, but it still works just fine.

These guns have always been expensive. The field gun was about $800 more than thirty years ago and the sporting clays gun was a tad over $2,000 when new (mid-90's). The trap gun was a little more than that (also mid '90's) but that was much less than any tournament trap gun with comparable features. I had a friend who paid over 8 grand for a fancy Italian gun and then spent another grand just to add some of the features that came stock on the Browning (porting, back-bored barrels, etc). IMO, it's one of those deals where you get what you pay for.

Just one example of how strong these guns are: I had a friend once who was warming up next to me before a tournament using his BT-99 trap gun. After each shot, his gun was opening up all by itself. His shots were noticeably louder than anyone else's and he said the gun was kicking the heck out of him, too. He switched shells and everything was back to normal. He later told me that he had got in a hurry and had used the wrong bushing in his reloading machine and those shells had a double charge of powder. The recoil was so bad it was over-powering the spring-loaded locking bar that keeps the action closed. I have no doubt that any lesser gun would have blown up in his face. I guarantee you that any auto-loader would have exploded. These are guns that will last for generations.
 
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