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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is my first time refinishing any type of wood to such a high finish. Ive done basic wood furniture work here and there, but nothing as meticulous as this process turned out to be. It was definitely a learning experience for me, which is now becoming more of an addiction that makes me want to spend money that I can't on more stocks. >.< I suppose I had that coming since the M1A/M14 itself is already an addiction. Unfortunately, being the photo junky that I am, I snapped hundreds of photos and can't even remember the exact chronological order that all of them were taken in. Plus the time stamps on the photos were jumbled up as well. But Ill try to put them in the right order if my memory serves me correctly.

I'll begin with how the stock looked when I received it without any type of refinishing and assembled. It didn't look too bad with the original CAL finish and it was obviously damaged around the butt end of the stock. Nothing horrendous, but I think it needed an overhaul.









I started out by stripping off the old finish by giving the stock several Simple Green baths while scrubbing with a ScothBrite Heavy Duty Scouring Pad. And let it sit for a couple days to dry.





To get it completely down to bare birch, I went a tad bit OCD on the next stripping process using an abundant amount of Paper Towel soaked in Acetone. I used a whole pint container of Acetone and I must say it turned out to look great!



 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Dry sanded the stock using 220 grit then wiped it clean with a Tac Cloth prior to applying the stain until it turned out to be the correct color tone I was shooting for. Well kind of... I let that stain dry for 12 hours or so, then I dry sanded the stock to my liking of smoothness with 320 grit. This time I didn't wipe it down with the Tac Cloth, but instead decided to hand rub the teak oil all over the stock and left the slurry to fill the pores. After 48 hrs I wiped the stock clean.





First stage of wet sanding began with 320 grit while using the Teak Oil as my medium. Afterwards I hand rubbed the slurry all around the stock trying to fill more of the pores. I let the slurry sit for 24 hours and wiped it off.

*** These photos may be titled "220oilsanded" but it was actually 320 grit I used. Im just too lazy to change it ***



 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I can't remember exactly if the following photos were wet oil sanded with 400 or 600 grit, but I'm sure y'all get the "picture" anyways. It continued to let it sit the in slurry for 24 hours after it was hand rubbed.





After the wipe down, this is wet oil sanded using 800 grit while the hand rubbed slurry sat for 24 hours. Then I wet oil sanded again but using 800 micro grit this time let the slurry sit again for another 24 hours. You can definitely see the difference in the glossy appearance. Heck! the stock itself felt as if it wasn't even wooden anymore.



 

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EmmAeiVee,

I really like what you've done with the place! She is an outstanding piece of wood.

I too, am a fan of the E2 stock. Carry on soldier.
 

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You've done a commendable job, thanks for the pictures and sharing the experience.

How much of your life do you estimate was consumed with the one stock?
 
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Refinishing the stocks can become addicting! To do it right is time consuming and refining "your process" can only be done through trial and error! Many on our forum have refinished beautiful stocks (all using different methods) but the end result and your personal satisfaction is all that counts! As I have told many members - refinishing stocks is a labor of love!

Congrats on the E2 - it looks fantastic!

M1Army
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Thanks a bunch guys! I always wanted a pistol grip style stock and I didn't even know that they existed until just about a few months before I finally pulled the trigger on my M1A purchase. From there on out, I just had to get a hold of one.

I also want to give a personal shout out to Doug Carlton for his magnificent refinishing of those countless amount of stocks that all of us literally drool over. He was able to help me out with clarification and some pointers to get me going in the right direction. Mine isn't up to par with his skills, but as of now Im quite the happy camper. And about how much of my life was taken while working on this stock alone. Oh man, I wouldn't even really know to be honest. I'd probably put my finger on the number of about 16 days, give or take a day or so. But it to me, it seems like an eternity, especially the impatience of waiting the 48 and multiple 24 hour periods for drying.

Since my camera is like always attached to me, I thought I'd include a photo of my little buddy that was never more than a couple feet away watching the entire process.



Picking up from where I left off with the pictures. Heres where the stock really comes to life. I began wet oil sanding with 1000 micro grit and oh boy, it felt like a knife through butter while the micro grit just glided across the stock. I also taped off the pistol grip to avoid any scratches while wet sanding the body and vice versa.









Those pictures don't even do enough justice. So I snagged a couple photos with sunlight on it. The thing is just glistening!





I continued the same wet oil sanding and hand rubbing routine with the 1200, 1500, and 2000 micro grit. I only took photos of the final wet oil sanding stage with the 2000 micro grit after I let it dry for a little over 24 hours.





Im hoping to take it out to the range next weekend with my kid nephew since he's been nagging about going with me. Ill snap some more photos in the next few days once its all assembled.
 

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My E2

I did not spend nearly the effort on mine that your did - - yours came out very nicely. I pretty much just oiled mine with BLO. Previous owner had done some work on it, but the linseed oil really brought out the grain.


 
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