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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi,

I'm looking for books that can improve my ability to shoot accurately. I'd imagine good books cover breathing, wind reading, shooting positions, and other things that are related to the shooter. I would like the book to explain how to make the shooter (NOT JUST THE RIFLE) more accurate at least out to the effective range of the M1A/.308. I'd prefer a book that covers things that are important in hunting and range shooting circumstances. If anyone has any recommendations please share. I realize books don't substitute for range time but they will help.

Thanks,
Connor
 

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Just my opinion, but more trigger, range and snapping in time will help you infinitely more than reading a book on the subject. If you are not doing so already, I would suggest that you try out service rifle high power matches, or attend a SAFS event (Small Arms Firing School). You will learn a lot and there are a lot of experienced shooters there than can and almost always do help you. Experience is the best education when it comes to shooting well.
 

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[ame]http://www.amazon.com/The-Wind-Book-Rifle-Shooters/dp/1581605323/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1337896899&sr=8-5[/ame]

And...

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/Secrets-Mental-Marksmanship-Perfect-Shots/dp/1581607210/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1337897007&sr=1-1[/ame]

Linda and Keith are well regarded and run their own training center.

Cheers
 

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The book I read several years ago that helped my pistol (and rifle actually) shooting was by Ed McGivern. It is called "Fast and Fancy Revolver Shooting" He has some REALLY good practicing techniques in there. When I started incorporating them into my regimen my pistol handling advanced considerably. Also my trigger control became much faster and smoother. Some things are purely for revolvers, the rest is applied across the board.

Also if you're a history buff it has some really neat bits of it in there.

As to just practicing and not reading. To each their own. Knowledge learned reading can be invaluable during a class or training or plinking or on the street if applied during live fire practice. I can't be at the range 24 hours a day, but I can read in bed, if I am shooting in bed I have bigger issues. JMHO.

[ame="http://www.amazon.com/McGiverns-Book-Fancy-Revolver-Shooting/dp/160239086X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1337898892&sr=8-1"]http://www.amazon.com/McGiverns-Book-Fancy-Revolver-Shooting/dp/160239086X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1337898892&sr=8-1[/ame]
 

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This isn't the end all be all of shooting publications but it is a good place to start, especially as a member of this forum.
 

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Try the Jim Owens website at Jarheadtop.com. 2 books from there helped me tremendously. Sight Alignment and Trigger Control is one and the other is Leather Slings and Shooting positions. Reading both of those a couple of times, lots of Dry firing and then more range time did wonders for me. I still have a ways to go but I'm head and shoulders above where I was a year ago.
 

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Attend a local highpower clinic. Shooting fundamentals aren't really that difficult to learn. It's the execution that takes mental discipline.

Shoot slow-fire and aim for the bullseye every single round. Practice positions until comfortable and dry-fire. Natural point of aim and focusing on the front sight post are essential. Books aren't much help. There is an USAMU book that explains the fundamentals and position shooting. Available from CMP. I have two copies....I loan one to new shooters when they need some study.

Practice, practice, practice. Dry-fire on a small dot across the room. Your skills are mastered at home on the floor. Your skills will rapidly improve and then plateau. Then you'll have to learn the art of breaking the shot on the way in and not the way out of the black. Easier said then done.

Learn to use a sling and get in there tighter than a tick.

I have attached the USAMU Rifle Marksmanship Guide (M14 Version)
 
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For long range high power shooting.
Precision Shooting at 1,000 Yards by Dave Brennan.
m14brian
[ame]http://www.amazon.com/Precision-Shooting-Yards-Dave-Brennan/dp/0967094887[/ame]
 

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Ways of the Rifle .22 Three-Position shooting Air Rifle by Baby Buhlmann Heinz Reinkemeier, et al in my opinion has good information about positions that also applies to other shooting disciplines.
Successful Pistol Shooting by Bob Hinkey and Art Sievers covers ways of shooting that run contrary to the mainstream thinking - some of which are just plain simple and workable. A sizable tome entertaining a remarkably simple set of ideas.
...
The above are intentionally a bit non-mid stream so as to round-out the growing list on this thread.
 

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I have probably taken more away from Coopers "The art of the Rifle" and Brian Enos' "Practical Shooting, Beyond Fundamentals" than any others, but anything by Nancy Tompkins or Jim Owens is going to be top notch info as well.
 

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Ways of the Rifle .22 Three-Position shooting Air Rifle by Baby Buhlmann Heinz Reinkemeier, et al in my opinion has good information about positions that also applies to other shooting disciplines.
Successful Pistol Shooting by Bob Hinkey and Art Sievers covers ways of shooting that run contrary to the mainstream thinking - some of which are just plain simple and workable. A sizable tome entertaining a remarkably simple set of ideas.
...
The above are intentionally a bit non-mid stream so as to round-out the growing list on this thread.
There's guys on the high power forum that swear by Ways of the Rifle. Reading their posts made me get a copy. Holy Crap! The section on prone is 50 pages long while standing is around 80.

Marty
 

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^^^^ It ain't that hard to need near 100 pages to describe a position. Last thing one needs is their head full of 5000 thoughts.

It's not nearly so difficlut. Learn positions and practice.
 

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When I first started shooting HP in 2003, at the age of 40, I just practiced what was natural for me and focused on sight alignment and trigger control. I made Master classification in my first five or six matches. After that, I started reading everything I could find to try to "improve". Over the years, I found my performance steadily deteriating to the point that I struggled to even shoot Master level scores anymore. Part of that is/was a result of my aging eyes but didn't explain all of it. Over the past few months, I've gone back to trying to get everything back to what I did naturally and I'm seeing improvements.

What I'm saying is that I think one can over-do trying to mimick others' techniques. I agree with the poster above recommending the CMP videos on HP shooting. They are very good. The AMU also has a shorter video on basic rifle marksmanship that is excellent. Don't know if it is still available but if it is, it is the best $10 you'll spend on shooting. Get something like that to show you the basics then step out to the range and work on those basics.

Just my $0.02 worth.
 

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CMP DVDs

Are you guys talking about the CMP/US Army Marksmanship Unit's DVD series "Mind over Matter"? If so, I agree. It is the only shooting series I have and I learned a ton of good information from it. Worth every penny.
Tom
 

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CMP has several DVD's that are kind of a " Soup to Nuts " approach to shooting. A great organization to boot that you would be helping with your dollars.
 

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I have Modern Highpower Competition by Randolph Constantine and it's an excellent book/resource...lot's of information and a huge book full of material.

my $0.02

45 ACP DI5

 

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Let me suggest a different avenue.

Small bore prone.

Find a local club shooting small bore prone matches and shoot with them.

While "trigger pull" is "trigger pull", the recoil and noise of centerfire masks errors that you will see in a small bore rifle. Small bore is all about position, perfect break, perfection in all aspects. You can see when you hit the trigger too hard, push it to the side, you push on your followthrough, sight alignment off, and your shots go everywhere when the rifle is not exactly in the same position as before. And you will see it real time.

A high master bud of mine was describing how trigger pull release and your stock grip is much more critical in small bore than high power.

You also have to read the wind, read mirage. A five mph wind change will blow you out into the nine ring. I look at grass, tree limbs, flags if they are out there, anything to correlate what I am seeing on target.

I shoot with friends who are Long Range F class National Champs and afterwards we all cry over lunch about the wind blowing us out.

I am finally shooting HM at Long Range and it is all due to the disciplene of small bore.

Accuracy is a skill acquired through constant practice.

When I finally shoot a 100-10X at 100 yards, I will stop bragging about these 100-9X targets.

 
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