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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

First off, I'm new here, been lurking for a little while.

I'm interested in purchasing a springfield M1A scout squad, and have been looking at a chassis to put it in to increase accuracy and have a more modern aesthetic.

Originally I was looking at the Troy MCS chassis, but that has unfortunately been discontinued and is pretty difficult to find.

My other option is the Blackfeather RS which has a similar aesthetic with the longer upper rail. So I was wondering what the best process would be for installation. I don't have much experience with mods that require gunsmithing, and upon watching Tony's videos, it seems quite a bit out of the range of my skillset. So I guess what is the best process for having the chassis installed considering I have not yet purchased the gun? Is it better to have it installed later on by a gunshop or would I be better off having someone specialized like Tony put it together for me?

Would love to hear suggestions. Thanks!
 

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I bought mine and took some learning hits but got her done myself!


Welcome by the way...
 

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It’s really not too hard to install. The hardest part is installing the oprod guide. As long as the proper tools are on hand it can be an easy and fun experience. Watch the Tonyben installation videos on YouTube to get familiar with the process. The chassis will also include detailed instructions however there are no pictures.

Here’s the tools you will need:
Non-marring mallet
Adjustable wrench
M14 castle nut pliers
2 stone cylinder hone 11/16” - 2 1/2”
Lapping compound
Set of Allen wrenches
3/8 box end wrench or socket
Aluminum pipe (included with black feather chassis)
Deremel or small grinder with grinding discs
2 Blocks of pine wood (2x4 or similar)
Gas lock wrench
Set of punches
Diagonal cutter pliers
Electrical tape

Recommended extra parts you should purchase:
Gas cylinder shim kit
Recoil spring retainer roll pin

Step 1:
Ensure rifle is empty and safe. Remove the rifle from the stock and remove recoil spring, oprod, and bolt.

Step 2:
Using the castle nut pliers begin loosening the flash hider retaining nut. Continue loosening the nut while drifting the flash hider forward until the entire assembly can be removed from the muzzle of the barrel. When the flash hider assembly is removed use electrical tape to protect the muzzle and threads or re install the castle nut to help protect the threads.

Step 3:
Use a 3/8” box end wrench or socket to remove the gas plug. Remove the piston. Use a gas lock wrench to loosen the gas lock. Unthread and remove gas lock. The gas cylinder can now be slid off the front of the rifle. If it is tight on the barrel you can use a block of pine wood and a hammer to tap it off the barrel. Mine was tight and needed to be tapped off. Your upper hand guard can now be slid forward and off the rifle.

Step 4:
Use a punch and mallet to drift the roll pin out of the oprod guide. Keep this roll pin in a parts box in case you ever want to reinstall the original oprod guide in the future. Place the muzzle of the rifle on a piece of pine wood and use a non-marring mallet and block of pine wood to tap the oprod guide towards the muzzle until it is free. This also may be kind of a pain to tap if it’s tight. You can applying some heat to the oprod guide using a propane torch to loosen it up a bit but be careful not to burn yourself. Heat wasn’t necessary on my rifle. The heat is just to expand the metal a bit.

Step 5:
Ensure that the recoil spring retainer pin is fully pushed into the receiver of the rifle. Using a fine tipped sharpie draw a line around the portion of the pin that sticks out the side of the receiver when the pin is fully pushed in so that you can see how much of the pin sticks out of the receiver. Use a pair of diagonal cutter pliers to grip the roll pin holding the recoil spring retainer pin into the receiver as close to the receiver as possible and pry it out using leverage. Use a piece of tape to mask your receiver so it doesn’t scratch. I can take pictures if this confuses you. When the roll pin is removed you can now remove the recoil spring retainer pin. Use a dremel and grinding disc to remove the marked material from the pin. Reinstall this pin into the receiver and reuse the roll pin to retain it. I suggest purchasing an extra roll pin in case it gets damaged during removal.

Step 6:
Remove the set screws from the new oprod guide. Test fit the new guide on the barrel. You want it to slide onto the barrel journal about 3/4 of the way before stopping. Watch Tonyben’s video for a nice demonstration of how it should fit. It will Probably be too tight. Use a cylinder hone in an electric drill and some lapping compound to begin to hone out the oprod guide. Test fit this often to make sure you don’t remove too much and have it fit too loose. It’s a lot easier and cheaper to fit the guide to the barrel rather than for the barrel to the guide. Once you have the proper fit make sure you clean the oprod guide so there is no residual lapping compound.

Step 7:
Using the aluminum pipe and a mallet tap the new oprod guide on to the barrel journal. You will need to test fit the action into the black feather chassis to get the oprod guide lined up with the hole in the bottom of the chassis that the oprod guide bolt goes into. Just tap it a few times and test fit. Keep repeating until it’s lined up. Once alignment is good use an adjustable wrench to make sure it is aligned properly with the action. You can test this by attempting to install it into the chassis. The oprod guide should fit perfectly into the narrow part of the chassis with an equal amount of clearance on both sides. Again check Tonyben’s video for a good visual example of this step. Once it is lined up you can see if the notch for the roll pin on your barrel lined up with the hole in the new oprod guide. It most likely won’t but that’s ok. It’s not necessary because it should have a nice snug fit and will be secured with set screws. Apply included loctite to the set screws and install them into the oprod guide and tighten per instructions. Set the barrel tensioning screw per the instructions included with the chassis and apply included loctite to the tension screw set screws and tighten snug.

Step 8:
Next install the new upper handguard of your choice following the instructions included with it. Only m14.ca hand guards and usgi/plastic hand guards are compatible due to the new oprod guide.

Step 9:
Reinstall the gas cylinder (I recommend taking the time to shim it as well since it is off just to help everything fit nicely together, this isn’t necessary), gas lock, piston, and gas plug. Also lubricate the oprod guide and install the oprod and bolt into the rifle and perform the tilt test to ensure that the components properly fit together on the barreled action. If everything is moving smoothly you can install the recoil spring and flash hider assembly.

Step 10: insert action into chassis (do not install oprod guide bolt) and attempt to install and lock trigger group. It should lock down tightly but not require excess force. If it is too tight I recommend filing some material from the trigger guard where it levers into the receiver. Do not remove material from your receiver! You can also try replacing your trigger guard with a USGI one. Sometimes this is enough to get it to lock down nicely. (If you find that you need to remove material from your trigger guard I recommend buying a spare trigger guard and using that one to fit the trigger to your chassis. That way you always have your original trigger guard in its original condition that you can install if you ever want to revert back to a standard stock set up.) After the trigger is locked in place perform a function test to make sure your hammer locks down when cycling the action and that the safety works and you should be good to go!


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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
It’s really not too hard to install. The hardest part is installing the oprod guide. As long as the proper tools are on hand it can be an easy and fun experience. Watch the Tonyben installation videos on YouTube to get familiar with the process. The chassis will also include detailed instructions however there are no pictures.
I appreciate you taking the time to write out this reply, and I really don't think I would mind doing it myself if I had a workbench and even a semblance of those tools, but I have essentially none of them, and just collecting that kit would be a daunting task, I'd assume.
 

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I appreciate you taking the time to write out this reply, and I really don't think I would mind doing it myself if I had a workbench and even a semblance of those tools, but I have essentially none of them, and just collecting that kit would be a daunting task, I'd assume.
Easy decision then. Send it to Tony. Enjoy when you get back. Share pictures.

*Edit*

Actually, I think Tony is a dealer. Send him your Scout Squad, buy the Blackfeather from him, it comes back with cool new furniture.
 
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