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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A question for those experienced with a scoped M-1A and a bipod. My situation is: I scoped my NM M-1A (Nitrex 3-15 in a Basset high mount with Weaver rings) and it was dead-nuts on (1 1/2 min groups) shooting off a rest at 200 yards. I then decided to mount a bipod and drilled out the front rivet on the sling swivel and replaced with a Harris mount stud (not glassed-in) and attached a Harris bipod. My groups opened up to 3 MOA with the bipod but stayed tight off a rest.
Anyone have similar experiences or suggestions on how to improve consistency with the bipod? Thanks.
"T"
 

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The mall ninjas are the ones that started this false idea that bi-pods are accurate, now you know that they are idiots and don't know what they are talking about.

The fact is, a bi-pod is an expedient measure used in the military to hit a man out to what ever distance the shooter feels comfortable with. Sometimes that is out to a few hundred yards and some times it's even further. But a pi-pod has inherent tolerances that allow the rifle to move excessively if you are shooting for accuracy. In addition, you have to remember a basic concept that always applies when you want to shoot accurately; hard on soft...always place anything that is hard on a soft support.

You can make a bi-pod work well with some basic rules of use;
  • Pre-load the bi-pod (push forward or pull backward, which ever feels most comfortable for you, against the legs of the bi-pod).
  • Have something soft under the feet of the bi-pod legs.
  • Make sure everything is tight.

Pre-loading helps ensure that the rifle is situated the same way for every shot. Pre-loading also helps with the shot follow-through and recoil. Having something soft under the bi-pod reduces the bounce during recoil and helps recover from the shot quicker. The last point, tightening everything, goes without saying and you probably don't need me to beat the idea to death.

There is one other thing that I don't see people talk about very much but it is something that needs to be dealt with consciously until it becomes habit and that's your firing position in general. Get in to position and take a moment to notice how your position feels with the bi-pod vs. without it. It isn't unusual to for it to feel more "cramped" with the bi-pod. That's just a position adjustment but until you learn to relax in the new position you will need to check off in your head the step of relaxing your shoulders and chest the same way for each shot.
 

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[*]Pre-load the bi-pod (push forward or pull backward, which ever feels most comfortable for you, against the legs of the bi-pod).
Interesting thread because I just bought an SA with a bipod installed. I found it a little difficult to get used to and switched back to a bench rest for my shooting but now I will probably go back and play around a little.

The reason I quoted the above is that it seems that this will depend on which way you have it mounted. All the bipods shown on the Harris website are folded forward, mine was folded backwards. I switched it around but haven't had a chance to go back to the range. Seems like folding forward would be better because when you put pressure on the butt that will press forward on the bipod, perhaps locking it in better. (Speculating here). I also found that the rifle was more inclined to bounce after each shot but that may be because I am not used to the bipod.
 

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That's some damn good advice RAMMAC. I teach a lot of marksmanship in the military and what RAMMAC said about putting the bipod legs on something soft and pushing or pulling is the same thing I tell machine gunners that aren't using a tripod. A bipod is like any other accessory, you have to use it properly to get what you want out of it.
 
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That's some damn good advice RAMMAC. I teach a lot of marksmanship in the military and what RAMMAC said about putting the bipod legs on something soft and pushing or pulling is the same thing I tell machine gunners that aren't using a tripod. A bipod is like any other accessory, you have to use it properly to get what you want out of it.
I may have been an air winger in the Marine Corps but I did do crew served weapons training from time to time (I loved playing with the old deuce) along with a few other weapons so I picked up a few things here and there. DI5
 

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I mounted a bipod on the front sling swivel post of my M700 varmint special and it works great.

I removed the front sling swivle on a GI synthetic stock, installed a QD sling/swivel post and mounted a bipod on the post for my M1A.

No comparison between how the two do. Its okay for something like target shooting but has issues that have to be overcome to use it for rapid fire at multiple targets at varying ranges while traversing left/right.

Awhile back I saw a guy with a QD post and bipod mounted about 2 or 3 inches in front of the mag well on a GI synthetic M14 stock and I'm going to give that a try.

The stock is stiffer back there. Smaller adjustments are needed for engaging targets as stated above. No clue yet what type of bounce issues it might have mounted nearer to the mag. well.
 

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I mounted a bipod on the front sling swivel post of my M700 varmint special and it works great.

I removed the front sling swivle on a GI synthetic stock, installed a QD sling/swivel post and mounted a bipod on the post for my M1A.

No comparison between how the two do. Its okay for something like target shooting but has issues that have to be overcome to use it for rapid fire at multiple targets at varying ranges while traversing left/right.

Awhile back I saw a guy with a QD post and bipod mounted about 2 or 3 inches in front of the mag well on a GI synthetic M14 stock and I'm going to give that a try.

The stock is stiffer back there. Smaller adjustments are needed for engaging targets as stated above. No clue yet what type of bounce issues it might have mounted nearer to the mag. well.
That's definitely one of the problems too, the fore end not being strong enough to handle the forces. Between all the forces involved a weak stock fore end will twist and turn and it could be striking the gas cylinder or the barrel which would adversely effect the accuracy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Great info

Thanks for all the replies and excellent advice. There is a wealth of knowledge on this site and a willingness to share experiences which is why I follow the forum.

I guess more practice with the bipod is in order. I was concerned about the thinness of the wood in the forearm whether it would be rigid enough to resist the stress from the bipod for stable shooting or even if recoil could crack the wood.

Again, thanks to everyone for the replies.
"T"
 

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Good stuff guys, especially from Ram.

I would only add, that I shoot off bipods alot. I shoot MOA with them. My key, is I sighted my designated weapons in with them, not sighted in without them, then added them later. I do everything exactly the same too, as Ram said. I use three different kinds, so I do the same for each kind, the pre load, the pressure, the pull back. It is a symphony that must be in tune.

Another interesting point is, that when folded and standing offhand ,non supported, the POI is the same. I thought that was kinda odd. Odder still, is the fact that I have three attachment modes, the sling swivel button, the arms QD, the standard rail configuration, and they all perform equally.

The sad part about all of it is, and also my worst fear, is that it is entirely possible that given enough rounds through these, that I will crack or split one of my fine walnut stocks. Then I will be upset let me tell you. So it looks like it's time to paint the G.I. fiberglass in my Nam Tiger stripe pattern, and pod it. Who needs four scoped and podded rifles anyway?.....oh, I do......
 

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ripsaw.....I did get the bipod off the barrel (as you suggested to me awhile back). I did the Sadlak front rail with stud. Haven't had a chance to try it at the range yet but I have the same fear that you have expressed here.....cracking the stock! I really had to remove a lot of wood to get the nut plate recessed enough. Now reading here about applying force on the bipod to lock it in makes me even more nervous. Oh well, if it cracks I guess a new stock will be in order! :)
 

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RAMMAC....Thanks for the advice given in this thread! I have read so much on this forum about how to improve accuracy. Most of the time it involves new parts and a bunch of money! Your help with the "human element" in accuracy is a great help to me.
 

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Not sure what others are using to attach the bipod mount to the stock.

I don't even know if these would work - but has anyone tried those nuts like the use on furniture and boat seats? The nut has a threaded shaft, larger diameter washer type top with 4 cut/bent spikes sticking downward.

Your drill a hole large enough for the shaft to pass through and then push the spikes down into the wood to bite in and keep the shaft/nut from turning - the screw/stud should pull the spikes into the wood.

Not sure if the spikes would lead to a cracked stock or not. Probably depends on the grain and how hard/soft the wood is.
 

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RAMMAC....Thanks for the advice given in this thread! I have read so much on this forum about how to improve accuracy. Most of the time it involves new parts and a bunch of money! Your help with the "human element" in accuracy is a great help to me.
Like I remind myself, any time you have an issue with accuracy you have to evaluate three main areas; the rifle, the ammo, and the shooter. Most often we all tend to blame the rifle first, suspect the ammo second, and then finally admit it's the shooter more often than not. In my case, I've found that me, the shooter, has caused the most issues due to either not knowing how to shoot better or getting lackadaisical since I'm an old timer now and I get arrogant and ignore the basics from time to time.
 

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I know what a USGI GC mounted bipod does to accuracy

but I have also wondered if even the stock-mounted bipod might potentially transfer enough weight of the rifle onto a concentrated point on the stock fore-end to potentially alter/adversely affect the tension relationship between the ferule and the front band lip....

probably doubtful on a match stocked/match conditioned rifle...but with a GI stock made of plastic or wood..
 
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I know what a USGI GC mounted bipod does to accuracy

but I have also wondered if even the stock-mounted bipod might potentially transfer enough weight of the rifle onto a concentrated point on the stock fore-end to potentially alter/adversely affect the tension relationship between the ferule and the front band lip....

probably doubtful on a match stocked/match conditioned rifle...but with a GI stock made of plastic or wood..

This is something to think about, and a very good point.
 

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Pre-load the bi-pod (push forward or pull backward, which ever feels most comfortable for you, against the legs of the bi-pod).

Pre-loading helps ensure that the rifle is situated the same way for every shot. Pre-loading also helps with the shot follow-through and recoil.
Tried it and and got 1cm of my group :ARM34:
 
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