M14 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello I was hoping the collective knowledge here would be able to help. I have been trying to deterine what 9mm factory round would be best for my Glock 19. I have not had a 9mm in over 20 years and I am not up to speed with newer rounds offered. I have read the older threads on this, just looking for help. ThanksJMPWNG2
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
939 Posts
Winchester's Ranger line is very stout ammo that will function well in your Glock 9mm.

It can be hard to find; however, their SXT 127-grain +P+ loading is pretty much the gold standard in 9mm performance. And their standard pressure SXT 147-grain loading isn't too shabby, either.

Their white-box "9mm NATO" ball ammo, which is loaded to almost +P pressures and sometimes can be found on store shelves, has been the standard US military cartridge for almost 30 years.

ETA: found this with a quick search. Good stuff right here:

http://www.sgammo.com/product/winch...ger-zq4364-147-grain-bonded-hollow-point-ammo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
876 Posts
Hello I was hoping the collective knowledge here would be able to help. I have been trying to deterine what 9mm factory round would be best for my Glock 19. I have not had a 9mm in over 20 years and I am not up to speed with newer rounds offered. I have read the older threads on this, just looking for help. ThanksJMPWNG2
I have been using Federal 147gr. jacketed hollow points and they run fine in my SR9c.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,680 Posts
Remington 9mm JHP. Cheapest good hollow point you can find. There are not any significant differences between Remington JHP and more exotic, more expensive hollow points. They all expand on contact, so don't overpay for nifty gimmicks.

I run Remington JHPs in both my G19 and G17.

I'm also a Glock Certified Armorer and you know what that means...squat.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Konigsberg13

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
Any 115gr to 124gr +P JHP from the majors will do. The copper-only jackets don't blow wind up my skirt. Currently, I've got Remington Golden Sabre 124gr JHP +P in mine.


Rich
 
  • Like
Reactions: Konigsberg13

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,577 Posts
Might want to watch a few of TNoudoors9's vids... good info IMO, though certainly not definitive.

[ame]http://youtu.be/A9TokjDG4iw[/ame]
 
  • Like
Reactions: Konigsberg13

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,118 Posts
Whatsinaname181 brought up an excellent and very important point.....muzzle flash. Statistics show that you are more than likely to engage in a deadly force encounter during periods of limited visibility. This means late at night or very early in the morning. You want a small and/or dark muzzle flash signature.

You're going to get some kind of muzzle flash, so you want the smallest flash possible. Then, you want the flash to be as dark as possible. They run the gamut from dark red, to red, to dark orange, to orange, to yellow, to white. Preferrably, you want dark red.

How do they get a small, dark red muzzle flash? By using different powders and additives, which cost more money. So no, when you buy the cheap Winchester and Remington regular box HP's, you are not getting the same ammo that you get by purchasing the "more exotic, more expensive" HP's. The cheap hollowpoints are using cheap powders that give you a big ol' white or bright yellow flash at night.

This flash helps the other guy pinpoint your location, but any flash will do that to some extent. Where the real harm comes from is that the brighter and lighter the flash, the worse your night vision will be effected and the longer it will take for your eyes to recover.

Most of the "exotic, expensive" HP loads use flash retardant powders. I know for a fact that the Winchester Ranger SXT and Speer Gold Dot loads do, as well as the Remington Golden Saber Bonded (has to be the Bonded load, not the regular Golden Saber) and Federal Hydra Shoks. I'm pretty sure the Hornady HST and Critical Defense loads do, but I'm not positive.

Here's a drill I do with my students during night force courses that I teach. I have them stand at 7 yards at night with no flashlight. They are able to see the cardboard IDPA silhouette with their own, unaided and night-adjusted eyes. I have them fire 1 round of their carry or duty load, wait until they can accurately see the target and fire a 2nd shot. If you don't have flash retardant powder, it's going to take you up to 5 seconds or more (depending on how bad the flash is) to reacquire and engage your target. 5 seconds is a world of time in a gunfight and puts you WAAAY behind the curve.

Anything thing that you usually get with the more exotic, expensive HP's is nickel-plated cases. These aid in extraction and enhance reliability, as well as fight corrosive better than regular brass. but they're not a must-have in my book.

So, here's my criteria for carry ammo:
1. 100% reliable in the firearm I will be using it in
2. Reasonably accurate (#1 is more important that #2)
3. Flash retardant powder
4. The bullet design has a street-proven record of success

That's a shame about Cor-Bon, they were the ones that pioneered and touted flash retardant powders. LE agencies insist on flash retardant powders, so why shouldn't you?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,372 Posts
Laugh if you want but -

I did some research on this for recommendation to my department on carry caliber (handgun). IMHO speed is king (velocity). Close 2nd in consideration is bullet design. In my off-duty 9mm/.40S&W/.45ACPs I carry Barnes XTP (basically same as CorBon DPX) alternated with rounds of Speer Gold Dot, yup, every other round in the mag. When carrying my LCP (.380ACP) I carry a flat nose FMJ (can't remember brand) alternated with Federal HydraShok. In the 9mm-45ACP, the first round (XTP) is light but penetrates fabric layers well while then still expanding in soft tissue. While the alternate (Gold Dot) can penetrate glass, car doors, wood and expands well in soft tissue IF they didn't hit something else first (the glass, car door, etc...). In the .380 - the Flat Nose penetrates layers of fabric and the HydraShok are good expanders in soft tissue again IF they don't get fabric first. Alternating rounds is not for target sharp shooting and it takes a few mags to get used to the varying loads but covers a bunch of scenarios involving clothing and light barricades. I don't really think about what round is next in the mag, I'm trained to pull the trigger repeatedly until the threat is stopped. Accuracy is also important but I don't expect a deadly encounter will be beyond 20 yards with handgun.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top