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the pillar

I called mine a "pillar" but its really a bushing for the action screw and the rear action lug is sitting on solid Devcon hopefully with no induced twist or strange torque loading. The barrel tension is the odd variable in the M14 platform....

I will keep relieving it in mind and its easier to take off material than putting it back!

In the picture it looks like the pillar goes all the way up to the lug, pictures can fool us..

Since your are not offended, here is something else, the screw and how it seats in the pillar can make a big difference maintaining torque.

An excellent way to assure a more constant torque is to use a counter sink on the pillar and match that with a like taper on the contact surface of the screw.. I knew the angle of the drill tip used and just matched that.. Plus I would lap the screw into it's seat.. That screw stayed with that rifle.. This method secures the screw better than a flat seat.. Takes extra work, but you seem to have the proper equipment and skills to add this touch..

Your post is a clear message to all that have never tried this as to the amount of work involved, plus the proper equipment required. It would be very difficult to do all this and not be compensated for your labor..

Keep up the excellent work.

My best regards.

Art L.
 

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Great post and thank you for sharing I find these types of exchanges very informative. May I ask a few questions?
1. I didn't grasp the importance of using a second different wire when bedding vs setup. Could you elaborate?
2. What did you find to be the advantages of the wire method vs controlling the spacing right at the ferrule?
3. Was there any difficulty with setting up the wire to maintain the barrel center down the stock center?


Thanks again for taking time to document and share.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
In the picture it looks like the pillar goes all the way up to the lug, pictures can fool us..

Since your are not offended, here is something else, the screw and how it seats in the pillar can make a big difference maintaining torque.

An excellent way to assure a more constant torque is to use a counter sink on the pillar and match that with a like taper on the contact surface of the screw.. I knew the angle of the drill tip used and just matched that.. Plus I would lap the screw into it's seat.. That screw stayed with that rifle.. This method secures the screw better than a flat seat.. Takes extra work, but you seem to have the proper equipment and skills to add this touch..

Your post is a clear message to all that have never tried this as to the amount of work involved, plus the proper equipment required. It would be very difficult to do all this and not be compensated for your labor..

Keep up the excellent work.

My best regards.

Art L.


The stainless steel bushing I machined actually fits the screw pretty close. I faced the bottom of the screw so its square with the bushing and left about .002" inch side clearance so its precise when inserted and no extra room. It feels great when you drop it in and torque it down.

You would never be able to line the threaded rear lug, bushing and screw without fitting them prior and securing in correct order.

I never considered the angular mating surface for contact / lock up.....
Nice tip !


Bedding a rifle is labor + material and waiting.

This gives people that have someone else bed their rifle an idea what is involved in the process.
Devcon is not that inexpensive anymore does not a long shelf life once opened.

I try to line up my bedding projects and use up all my material.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Great post and thank you for sharing I find these types of exchanges very informative. May I ask a few questions?
1. I didn't grasp the importance of using a second different wire when bedding vs setup. Could you elaborate?
2. What did you find to be the advantages of the wire method vs controlling the spacing right at the ferrule?
3. Was there any difficulty with setting up the wire to maintain the barrel center down the stock center?


Thanks again for taking time to document and share.


Once you bend the wire ( between the stock and barrel ) the tension is gone if you separate the two.
If you try to re-use it the tension is different from a virgin / unbent wire.

I tried different diameters of wire to find one that had good tension by inserting them and pushing the action home. This can also be changed by changing the placement of the wire distance / from the ferrule.
Its why I put painters tape on the forearm and made a line with a sharpie to put it in the same spot once I was satisfied with it.

Using the wire the barrel really self centers.
I had WAY more issues using the old donut fixture that made contact with the ferule tips.
 

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I have a new Mac stock that I’m going to have someone else bed. It came from McMillan with the front ferrule. I must have gotten lucky. Excellent post.
 

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Using the Wire method..

The wire method is ready availabe, the donut fixture is more complicated to make and neither of them is my choice, that does not mean they will not do the job to some degree..

If you consider the two they both rely on different areas of the stock, this means the channel has to align with the ferrule or the ferule has to align with channel. That sounds convolute at first read, but consider what you are attemping to accomplish and why..

The objective is to align the front band \ lip to dead bottom of the stock furrel to produce a vertical center-line. A vertical center line when draw pressure is added pulls the barrel stright down, so the matching of the FB lip to the ferrule is of upmost importance. It determines the difference between an average shooting rifle and an excellent one..



That leaves the last and best choice, the stand-off devise. It can be made from almost any hard material in a half hour and used over many times.. To all that plan to try bedding take a few minutes and investigate the Stand Off Divise, it's simple and not costly... It takes the "Maybe" out...

Ever wonder why the late built Match M1's were so accurate and held up for so long, equilibrate.. Art
 

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Discussion Starter #28
That leaves the last and best choice, the stand-off devise. It can be made from almost any hard material in a half hour and used over many times.. To all that plan to try bedding take a few minutes and investigate the Stand Off Divise, it's simple and not costly... It takes the "Maybe" out...
Any pics of one to share ?
 

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Discussion Starter #29
I will say Mac makes an excellent stock.

I have only bedded three of them two with standard GI barrels and one rear lug with the heavy barrel but all have been pretty damn straight as an arrow for the ferrule centerline and even height.

I still vaguely remember of some guys using Mac stocks as a drop in and shooting them without bedding material. One person at my local range was doing it as well trying to convince me I was wasting my time by bedding mine.

I just smile at him and refrain from saying what comes to mind.
 

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Using the wire on wood stocks can leave dents in the stock, I am going to try using a piece of banding strap [the stuff you use to strap things to pallets] to apply the pressure on a walnut stock I am working on.

Casey
 

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Thanks for taking the time to put this together. I really do enjoy bedding rifles, which is probably a good thing because I usually have to do it a few times to get it where I want it. Devon is also my bedding material of choice. I have noticed since it is so thick it usually leave some slight voids in the vertical surfaces. I know it really doesn't matter that much but the look just bothers me. I like the idea of painting the exposed inletting with Devon. I was thinking the next rifle I do I will use devcon steel putty for the bulk of the bedding then follow it up with some devcon steel liquid to skim coat the bedding and paint the exposed inletting, just to make everything look good. Another material I would love to try for bedding that I used to use as a mech was belzona. That is some seriously strong stuff, but also seriously expensive.

Art, when you talk about a stand off device do you mean a hard object that fits inside the forend of the stock under the barrel to work as a fulcrum?
 

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Before doing any bedding, check the alignment of the receiver legs in the stock, and whether the barrel is centered in the stock channel. And also check the alignment of the stock ferrule and the lower band - the 'pull' on the band should be straight down.

If the alignment of all those things isn't good (straight and with no sideways pressure), think about how to fix it. The purpose of the bedding material is to fill the spaces that are needed for the receiver / barrel / ferrule to be in good alignment when installed in the stock.
If any 'stock fitting' is needed, it should be done before bedding.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
 

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Excellent write up, pictures and description. I have an M1A Champions Choice built for me with the McMillan stock, same color scheme as yours, Springfield lugged receiver, Douglas heavy barrel 1 in 10 rifling , nice trigger. Your article shows me a lot about the time and labor that goes into making one. Thanks very much for sharing this.
 
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