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When bedding a GI wood stock, does the stock liner stay in or come out? Also, if a stock is bedded, will only that receiver fit, or will any other drop in? Reason I ask is I saw a bedded stock for sale, but if I understand correct, mine might/might not fit due to variances in different receivers. Thanks, Taz
 

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1. Metal stays in but can get deburred and is checked for full contact I believe.

2. Each bedding job is particular to only one receiver.

3. Correct, your receiver might fit but it's the same as an unbedded stock.

Good Luck!!
 

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Aloha Taz,

Cheetahman is correct that a "bedded" stock is for a particular and specific receiver and if the stock came with a liner, it would usually be kept in to add strength to the bedded areas.

However, with that said, if you see a stock that you like, and if its already bedded, it may be a worthwhile consideration. To rebed that stock to fit your receiver will be much easier than trying to start from scratch. And, if its a nice looking stock then it may really be worth it to pursue.

Just my $.02.

Aloha,

Tom O.
 

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I have had good luck (increased accuracy) when I swap 1 bedded M1 stock onto mutliple rcvrs. Not as good as one stock per rifle, but much better than no bedding at all!
 

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Even for a "simple" bedding job, the stock liner should come out. The reason for this, is to equalize the recoil impact on the wood behind the stock liner. Well used stocks are commonly seen with a crack in the wood behind the stock liner screw. This is caused by the screw taking the brunt of the recoil force on one side, rather than the wood behind the liner.

FA sells a snake eye bit for taking out the screws. With the liner removed, you rout out a 1/8" vertical channel where the back of the stock liner sits. With release agent on the stock liner, it may be removed from the rifle later if needed.

Another step up on the complication ladder for bedding, is to skeletonize the stock liner, taking maybe a third of its width away wherever it contacts the receiver legs and recoil/counter-recoil areas of the wood. The stock liner laughs at a file, use a grinder.

Kuhnhausen's Shop Manual gives bedding instructions and diagrams which range from pretty simple, to very complicated. Bedding behind the stock liner, IIRC, is just above the simplest, and is something you should probably do.

The used, bedded, stock you are considering buying may or may not fit your rifle. If it's a stock you want, it shouldn't be much of a problem to figure out where the excess bedding interferes with your fit. And if your rifle is not tight enough in the bedding areas, they can easily be roughed up, dremeled out again, and rebedded.
 

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I've never heard of anyone being able to remove the liner after the bedding was done.

The whole idea with bedding is to insure a tight fit between receiver and stock with no "movement". Movement is what causes loss of accuracy.

The liner is needed in wood stocks due to the soft nature of wood.
The liner should be modified per MTU-NM, so removing the liner after bedding is impossible. Well, that is unless the procedure has changed recently. :?

I beleive Tanks Rifle shop is still bedding the liner to the stock as well. :roll:



 
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