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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey fellas, I had a few questions regarding stock swelling. I went hunting this past weekend down here in Florida. Lots of humidity. The rifle didn’t fire and I noticed the bolt hadn’t completely closed. I planned to send this stock to get a bedding job done. Now my concern is will constant swelling affect the bedding job? Thanks for any help in advance 🇺🇸
 

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Yes, that’s what I’m assuming. It happened in the morning. As the day went on and the sun was over head it cycled fine
There isn't any place on the M14 operating system where stock contact would keep the bolt from locking, even if soaking wet.

When an M14 is match bedded, everything except the receiver is clearanced to avoid contact, so that parts cannot vibrate against each other.
 

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Any chance you didn’t let the bolt slam home and it was just out of battery and it didn’t go bang thank the Lord.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
There isn't any place on the M14 operating system where stock contact would keep the bolt from locking, even if soaking wet.

When an M14 is match bedded, everything except the receiver is clearanced to avoid contact, so that parts cannot vibrate against each other.
Ok, good to know. Again I assumed it was due to swelling only because it was covered in condensation. As I sat in the stand and my thoughts began to wander, I was curious if constant swelling would affect a bedding job. Thanks for the response, much appreciated
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Any chance you didn’t let the bolt slam home and it was just out of battery and it didn’t go bang thank the Lord.
When I racked the bolt I did let it go, however it was extremely early and dark when the guide came and got us out of camp. It’s possible that it didn’t seat completely. The trigger pull came about 2 hours after when I had the hog in my sights. After the click I racked the bolt again and of course the hog took off
 

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Ok, good to know. Again I assumed it was due to swelling only because it was covered in condensation. As I sat in the stand and my thoughts began to wander, I was curious if constant swelling would affect a bedding job. Thanks for the response, much appreciated
The trick to avoid swelling is oil. The more oil that is absorbed into the wood, the less room there is for moisture. After your stock is bedded, soak the wood, inside and out with Teak Oil until it can't absorb any more. Use a toothbrush to work it into the grain and wipe off any excess with a paper towel. Do that once year.
 

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There isn't any place on the M14 operating system where stock contact would keep the bolt from locking, even if soaking wet.

When an M14 is match bedded, everything except the receiver is clearanced to avoid contact, so that parts cannot vibrate against each other.
Curious and I’ve not looked to see if it’s feasible could warping or swelling cause contact with oprod? I seem to recall my Boyd’s was fairly close on the oprod cut. Though I could be mistaken and the rifle isn’t in it to look at the moment.

ETA: reason I mention I wouldn’t think it would take much pressure at all to slow going in to battery
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The trick to avoid swelling is oil. The more oil that is absorbed into the wood, the less room there is for moisture. After your stock is bedded, soak the wood, inside and out with Teak Oil until it can't absorb any more. Use a toothbrush to work it into the grain and wipe off any excess with a paper towel. Do that once year.
Will do! Thanks again
 

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How much and what kind of lubrication are you using. The wrong lubricant can thicken in the cold or pick up lots of fouling, either of which could slow the bolt down and prevent it from going in to battery properly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
How much and what kind of lubrication are you using. The wrong lubricant can thicken in the cold or pick up lots of fouling, either of which could slow the bolt down and prevent it from going in to
ba
How much and what kind of lubrication are you using. The wrong lubricant can thicken in the cold or pick up lots of fouling, either of which could slow the bolt down and prevent it from going in to battery properly.
Battle born grease by breakthrough. No doubt what you mentioned is possible. I’m starting to believe that my gloved hand interfered with the oprod. Again it was dark and in a hurry I placed the heel of the stock on my right thigh and with my left hand grabbed up towards the front of the rifle before I slingshotted the charging handle with my right
 
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