M14 Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A few question on Bedding a fiberglass stock.. for those who know how to do it.. I'm bedding a USGI fiberglass stock for a friend. I've bedded a few wood stocks, in the past, but I've never bedded a fiberglass stock.. It has been a long time also..since I did a bedding job so I'll be a bit rusty.... This stock has been milled out for a rear lug as the receiver is a rear lugged type.. So I'll be making a pad for the rear lug to sit on.. My question is 1) since the stock is mostly open inside as in the molding process a lot of stock space is voids.. so the traditional method of milling a slot into the stock would just go through into the voids.. What is the answer to that question.. what does one do? Fill in the void with epoxy? That is a lot of space to fill and will add a bunch of weight..use a bunch of product etc.. 2) What is the best bedding epoxy.. I have both accuglass jell and JB weld.. I don't have any new steel bed or such... Any real advantage to adding steel to the glass? This gun has a USGI SAK barrel so it doesn't have a Heavy match barrel or a bunch of NM parts other than the receiver... B2B
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Some pics added



Void in stock..


Barrel date mark


Old gunsmith trick Plumbers putty to keep bedding material where it belongs


A great manual on NM prep of M1 and M14 rifles..
 

·
MGySgt USMC (ret)
Joined
·
7,066 Posts
With G.I. fiberglass stocks, I've found it is best to fill in the voids in stages and then glass the receiver down. I normally fill in the right void for the connector assembly first and that's already been done on your stock.

As to how much you should fill in on the sides behind the receiver legs, well, that is sort of up to you. On a NM rifle, I fill in the entire "L" shaped void behind the receiver legs on each side because I "think" it helps smooth out the recoil shock. I can't prove that, but it does make the stock more stable. On a Walter mitty rifle, I fill in under the rear and both sides going forward as far as I filled in on the right side to fill in the connector void. I put clay ahead of those points so the bedding compound doesn't flow furher forward and clean out the clay after the compound has cured.

I also fill in the voids ahead of the receiver legs on a NM stock, but usually don't do it on a Walter Mitty Rifle.

Either way, I fill in only one side at a time and "overfill" it then set it down on that side to cure. Then I file it back to the original dimensions after the bedding cures, so the trigger housing goes in and out correctly. Then I do the other side and then finally the back. Before I bed the entire receiver, I clear out any stuff that oozed into the area for the lug just enough so the lug goes in and out freely. Any place you want the bedding to set up against the receiver has to be roughed up whether it is new glass or the original fiberglass stock surface. Otherwise the bedding may not/probably won't stick correctly to the fiberglass stock.

If you are going to use bedding compound to stiffen the forearm, I have found it is best to do that BEFORE you bed the receiver in the stock.

Just so I don't forget, BOTH the front and rear of the lug have to have at least a 2 degree angle if you are going to bed the rear lug the way you have shown it clayed up. What I'm talking about is from the side of the lug, it is sort of "V" shaped with a flat side n the bottom of the "V" of the lug. You have to have that angle on the rear of the block, but you don't have to have it on the front IF you clay on the front side of the lug going all the way from the top to the bottom. You put clay all over the front surface and then cut the clay so there is a thin clay wall on the front side of the lug. When the bedding material sets up and you clean the clay off, this leaves room for the front of the lug to go in at the 2 degree angle the receiver goes into the stock.

Not sure if I have covered everything for you, but if you have more questions, please ask.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That is some good info.. sounds like I need to get some cheaper epoxy if I'm to fill in the voids there is a lot of space to fill in.. I can see why you'd do it in stages also, kinda need to.. thanks B2B
 

·
MGySgt USMC (ret)
Joined
·
7,066 Posts
I use Marine Tex to fill in the voids as well as doing the main bedding job because it is strong and will stick properly to the fiberglass WHEN you roughen the surface. I've never used Bisonite or Brownells' Accraglass for it. I'm not sure what JB Weld may cost to get enough to fill in the voids around the receiver and quite frankly I have never bothered to figure it out because I always keep enough Marine Tex on hand to do it. It works extremely well and I don't want to waste my time and effort on a epoxy compound that might not work and may only be a little less expensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
yeah I agree I think JB weld would be expensive, I've always used accuglass mostly with brown colored dye added.. when I first did my own stock many years ago.. I didn't use the color dye but I didn't care what it looked like I just wanted to improve the accuracy, this job is just a favor for a friend.. I'd rather keep from spending a bunch of dough on supplies for it..it's not all that big a deal as far as the gun has a GI barrel .. so it's not a full blown NM rifle build anyway.. Thank you for your info.. I check into marine text.. B2B
 

·
MGySgt USMC (ret)
Joined
·
7,066 Posts
Have to take something back. I have used Accraglass Gel a couple of times to fill in the rear selector cut outs on a G.I. fiberglass stock, but did the rest with Marine Tex. Accraglass will stick to the roughened surface of the stock and you could use it to fill in other areas. However, Marine Tex is much superior for the actual receiver bedding, trigger housing bedding and of course for filling in the forearm area - if you plan on doing that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks Gus I'll have to look into marine tex.. I did reglass my canoe with some polly gel coat..that was a job.. but I don't do that much glass work. Never have in reality, I'm just a hobby gunsmith.. and I haven't shot high power in years..so no real need.. but I'm basically out of Accuglass now.. I think this bedding will help my buddies rifle out.. that rear lug needed a place to sit.. I built my M14's back when they were cheaper...to build.. bedded a few..I may build one more with a forged receiver.. but the price of the parts these days, is getting out of my price range.. I did order a parts kit from the CMP and I'll post results in a new thread.. but short story is..the parts I got were well used..not sure that is a good deal. B2B
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Gus

I have never used Marine Tex for bedding but have for automotive repairs. I have used Accraglass with aluminum and steel powder for several bedding jobs on Rem 700s and after 15 years on my pet rifle, I have seen no deteriation of the bedding with the steel bed. I understand that an M1A or M14 are different critters and have not bedded one. Is there something about the Marine Tex that holds up better with the recoil pulse?? Can one mix the steel/alum powder with the M/T. Have you used/ can you recomend this with M/T or Accra on a M1A?? As said, I have not bed a M1A and I hate to do a job twice, but I have both on hand and can go either way. As with anyone I tend to go with what I have the experience with. Is there an aspect the M/T is better????
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top