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I am watching full metal jacket and in the scene after the wounded have been evacuated there is a scene of a camera crew photographing the Marines. One of the men is carrying a lever action BB gun or at least it looks that way to me.
 

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I am watching full metal jacket and in the scene after the wounded have been evacuated there is a scene of a camera crew photographing the Marines. One of the men is carrying a lever action BB gun or at least it looks that way to me.
I was at the range Friday and this guy had an FX with an air tank shooting 30 caliber pellets with a Vortex 4-27 razor hd on it. I said damn I have to check this out. Gun was pretty cool he has 2k in the gun and 3200 in the optics he overpaid but nice setup. I shout it a couple times not impressed for that kind of coin. But zero recoil and very predictable.
 

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You're gonna put charlie's eye out with that thing kid.
I flipped over to that flick and saw Crazy has got a thin stocked gun in the back of his web gear next to his E tool. Can't tell if it's a red rider or what. It's just before he picks up the booby trapped rabbit.
Inquiring minds want to know.
 

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Daisy Red Ryder BB gun

Crazy Earl carries a lever-action Daisy Red Ryder BB gun in addition to his M-16 throughout the movie, as carried by his character in the book on which the film is based, The Short Timers.



I thought everybody knew that........?
 

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I never knew this, but I have a question: WHY ON EARTH WOULD YOU CARRY A DAISY RED RIDER IN VIETNAM? What superiors would allow this?

A very silly concept.
Because after being in a crazy country and after killing a few people you kinda go crazy yourself.
 

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War in itself is basically a huge "foreign" concept to the base mind of people.

Once you introduce and develop a "war syndrome" into the psyche of the individual, it is never totally predictable what you will get for the outcome.

Most of the time it is a good soldier, . . . follows orders, . . . does his/her job, . . . plays on the team, . . . etc.

Every now and then you produce a crazy Joe, . . . and Animal, . . . or something along those lines. The officer walking on the beach, shirtless, in the black cavalry hat, saying he loved the smell of napalm in the morning is almost a true to life example.

BB guns on the battlefield would be another.

May God bless,
Dwight
 

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Every now and then you produce a crazy Joe, . . . and Animal, . . . or something along those lines. The officer walking on the beach, shirtless, in the black cavalry hat, saying he loved the smell of napalm in the morning is almost a true to life example.

BB guns on the battlefield would be another.

May God bless,
Dwight[/QUOTE]

Don't forget those two Brits on D-Day. One played the Bag Pipes and one carried a Claymore Sword!
 

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Cannot for the life of me remember exactly "when", but a "program" did exist back then I believe called "Quick Kill" training with BB Guns in point shooting without using sights!

http://militarythoughts.blogspot.com/2008/05/this-is-coolbert-quick-kill.html[/QUOTE

BB-guns were a part of Basic Combat Training in 1968/69 at Fort Bliss, Texas. They were used during bivouac week at McGregor Range. They weren't actually issued; Committee Group provided them at the range. Squad-size groups basically had supervised BB-gun fights. Each trainee wore a clear acrylic face shield to prevent eye damage. While they were mostly benign, the BB's still hurt, so the trainees quickly learned that not being hit was the best course of action. My opinion was that it was very effective training.
 
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