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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If I am careful while inserting the cleaning rod from the muzzle end, do I really need to buy a protector for the crown? I know that I can also use a spent 12ga shotgun shell for protecting the crown, but again, is that needed if I am careful. I am curious how many M1A owners here actually use a muzzle/crown protector to clean the bore of their rifles.

Thanks,

J
 

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While it’s a good practice, it isn’t necessary. The Garand Collector Association did a test on a M1 to determine how much muzzle wear a standard GI steel cleaning rod would produce (the results were published in their Spring 09 journal). During the test it took them 66,000 strokes in order to degrade the barrel enough to change the ME reading one mark on the gauge. During this test they were trying to inflict wear on the barrel and were being as abusive as they could. So I would guess if you were careful it would take you 100,000 strokes to produce enough wear to change your ME by one increment.
 

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Do you need a flash suppressor protector? No, not really. If you want to clean with a rod, a good coated rod will serve you fine. The brass muzzle/crown protector is more valuable cleaning Garand barrels. Once it's on the rod and there's a brush on the other end it's easier to leave it there so it doesn't get lost.
 

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Just use a good one-piece cleaning rod , never the parkerized GI sectional rod. The sections rarely line up perfectly , and the parkerizing is fairly abrasive.
 

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From the ridiculous number of M1 muzzles that I've seen with dings and other issues, I'd go with "yes"
 

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From the ridiculous number of M1 muzzles that I've seen with dings and other issues, I'd go with "yes"
Right. I hope there wasn't any confusion about that. Most any M1 that comes from CMP, except maybe collector grades, should get a muzzle crown clean-up as part of the prep process for shooting. If the shooter goes to the trouble to do that, there's no excuse not to protect the new crown when cleaning (and at all times, really).
 

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I use a pull thru system to clean my M1/M14 barrels. Use it with brush and patch. It is just me, but I can't stand thought of going in from the muzzle to clean the barrel. Others may argue why push and embed all the crud, which the build up is more at the chamber end, all the way the length of the barrel. It is a risk assessment thing. In my simple mind, how much pressure, crud and all, will a wet patch impart to the barrel compared to the last round you just fired.

My method, not right nor wrong, just different.
 

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I use a pull thru system to clean my M1/M14 barrels. Use it with brush and patch. It is just me, but I can't stand thought of going in from the muzzle to clean the barrel. Others may argue why push and embed all the crud, which the build up is more at the chamber end, all the way the length of the barrel. It is a risk assessment thing. In my simple mind, how much pressure, crud and all, will a wet patch impart to the barrel compared to the last round you just fired.

My method, not right nor wrong, just different.
Your method seems to work for you considering your success!
 

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My opinion as whether it is Necessary or Not is not Important. What is important is What will make you Feel Better?
and Since you seemed Concerned over the Crown Get one and Use It.Follow your Heart on this one
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Charles, you're absolutely right. I went ahead and ordered a bore guide and a cleaning port from Midway. Man! I've never spent so much money caring for a rifle before.
 

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It turns into a rythm or ritual. After X number of rounds or a day's firing or whatever you choose, you clean the same way every time. A coated rod was mentioned...but a bore guide should still be used to avoid tearing the coating. I found out the hard way. You are always pulling out the rod and patch so put a stripper clip backwards into the clip guide and the bolt won't attack you. Some clean the rifle upside down to keep solvent out of the gas system.

I used the 12 ga method long before a delrin guide. I carved grooves into the sides to use a rubber band llooped around the bayonet lug or front sight to hold the guide in place.

Whatever way you choose, have fun. It's sort of like keeping an old car up and running.

Bruce
 
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