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Anybody ever fluted their barrel?

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In particular, has anybody ever fluted a GI contour barrel? Is that possible, or is it too thin to begin with. It may help mitigate the POI deviation when it heats up...
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I remember a post a few months back where, I believe it was Warbird fluted a barrel. I believe it was a heavy or medium weight though. For sustained shooting with as little shift in POI because of barrel heat I believe you will have to get a heavier barrel. The POI change on my standard weight USGI barrel is not that severe as to effect my scores a whole lot. My rifle can out shoot me in 3 position matches.JMO, but I don't believe there is enough metal on a standard contour barrel to flute.
 

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I agree. I can see wher it might help on a heavy barrel with cooling to help it maybe last a little longer but not on a standard weight for any other purpose.

FWIW, I think a standard would be way too thin for any kind of fluting that would be at all effective.
 

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One of the theoretical benefits to fluting is to lighten a heavy barrel... a standard barrel has a light profile already.... It is pretty well optimized as it is. I'm not sure you would want to lose any more mass.

TC
 

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help, I think I'm going crazy. I have also wondered about fluting, and when I was looking at barrels for a bolt gun build, looked at the websites of all the major manufacturers. A couple of them offered it, and extoled the virtues of a fluted barrel. One other, however, (can't remember if it was Lilja or Shilen), did not offer it, said it did not offer ANY benefits, and very plainly stated that if their barrel was fluted, warranty was void. What's the consensus on this? Does fluting offer any benefit other than weight reduction?
 

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I also understand that it adds strength by way of rigidity. Whether or not that equals shot to shot consistency is the question.
 

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Fluting does a couple of things like lighten and assist cooling, but it doesn't add 'rigidity'.
Removing metal can only serve to weaken a structure, however slightly. A fluted heavy barrel is stronger than a standard contour barrel and I think that's where the confusion started.
 

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LVMPDawg said:
Fluting does a couple of things like lighten and assist cooling, but it doesn't add 'rigidity'.
Removing metal can only serve to weaken a structure, however slightly. A fluted heavy barrel is stronger than a standard contour barrel and I think that's where the confusion started.
Right on target. :arm34:




 

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Fluting is one of those endeavours that can easily fall under the Law of Diminishing Returns. There can always be exceptions to that law as Warbird's magnificent example shows. I am curious as to how much weight was recovered there? Regardless, it is beautifully done...bravo!

However, one can go too far. I believe I saw this in another forum, (unfortunately now I can't remember which one...csp maybe??)but...

Did anybody else see the pictures of the new Sako factory fluted barrels that split along the fluted channels while using factory ammo? There was more than one incident of this happening, I believe.

That might add some spice to this discussion...sorry I can't remember the link guys...

TC
 

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Guys, with all due respect, I disagree. EVERYone here knows more about the M14 rifle than I do, but the explanation given to me makes me believe that fluting actually adds strength. Yes, if you randomly remove metal, it will weaken the structure. However, if it is removed in an specific and engineered way, it can add strength.

We all know that one of the benefits to fluting is increased cooling, and that comes from an increased exterior surface area. That same increased surface area is what give it the increase in strength. For example, if a barrel (or metal blank)'s exterior surface area measures 1 inch circumference, let's say that the flutes give a new exterior surface measurement of 1.25" Now, the strength is equal to a barrel or blank of 1.25", which would be stronger than the 1 inch before it was fluted.

Also, think of it like this. Take the same 1" circumference blank. Now, manufacture it in a way that gives it 8 convex "splines" running lengthwise along the exterior. This splines would obviously add strength due to the increase in rigidity. Now, instead of those "splines" being convex, change them to concave, as with flutes. Even though the metal is gone, the concept is the same, and rigidity is increased.

Just my 2 cents worth, Taz
 

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Warbird, how much weight reduction was there with the fluting job you did on that barrel? Any noticeable reduction in the barrel heating up?
 

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Well, to add further confusion to this matter, I have read that fluting only serves to add more surface area to aid cooling, and will not add strength unless the amount of metal removed by fluting is added to the circumference of the barrel. Which brings to mind, how would one do that? Unless the author of that meant to say that a larger diameter barrel that is fluted would be stronger than one of smaller diameter that is not fluted, the weight of both barrels being the same. I am not an engineer, however I believe there would be some strength benefit to a properly engineered fluting arrangement, all else being equal. Any engineers out there who can help?
 

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Eagle, by adding flutes, you DO increase the circumference. The only way I can explain it is to take something circular, and trace around it with a pencil. Then, in about six or eight evenly spaced spots, erase a small part. Then, pencil in a dip, or flute. This distance that you add will measure more than you erased, so therefore, your total distance around, including concave areas of the flutes, is more than you started with. I'm no engineer, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn. Years ago.

BTW, a friend of mine is a Police Chief up in Lexington, Ill; about two hours south of Chicago. You anywhere near him? taz
 

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Flutes do add strength. Think about a "blood groove" on a knife. A blood groove would be needed on a stabbing knife. Yet I have yet to see one with a blood groove. The blood groove is to add strength. Many katana samauri swords had the groove only on one side because that is all that was needed.

HH
 

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Don't confuse strength and rigidity. Fluting will make the barrel more rigid.

As far as strengthening, it does, but not in a way that matters in this application. It is going to be stronger in a cantelever mode. So, if you wanted to use the barrel as a beam to hang weights from, then yes, fluting would make it stronger. But if you want to pressurize the barrel and spit out a bullet, then no, fluting isn't adding any strength.

Ty
B.S. Mechanical Engineering
(but don't assume that I referenced any books or notes during the typing of this response)
 

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Circumference is a measure of the distance around a CIRCLE. It is given as C=2PIr, where PI=3.1415927 and r=the radius of the circle (or C=PId, where d=diameter of the circlce). It seems to me you can describe the major or minor circumference of a fluted cylinder, but not both in the same value. A cross section of a fluted cylinder is not a circle, it's a sprocket!

Another way to think of it, tie a string around the barrel. Measure it, then flute your barrel and tie a string around it again- it should be the same length.

that makes sense about the difference in strength TYPES, by fluting you make a better prybar, but a weaker pressurized device.

This addition didn't really help anything did it?
Dave
 
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