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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking to shape the edges of an opening, and would like to use a fairly wide router bit, at a depth that does not expose the entire bit to the edge.

I found this bit, which has the profile I'm looking for, but I'm pretty certain my hand router won't work with it.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1pc-1-2-shank-3-1-2-Diameter-Roman-Ogee-Raised-Panel-Router-Bit-S/172710261814?hash=item2836557436:g:~ZsAAOSwal5YF8vn

I've got a Makita 0701c little router,

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00E7D3V4S?tag=duckduckgo-d-20&linkCode=osi&th=1&psc=1

and I'm thinking it simply may not work simply because the base is too small. Any affordable and not frustratingly junky routers that will accommodate this?

Thanks much.

Any of you experienced router operators have good suggestions?
 

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Maybe show a picture of the piece you are working on.

Consider attaching a stand off to the router base. It would be like a shim in a way that may allow only a portion of the bit to be exposed. Obviously it depends on the profile you are looking for and range of adjustment on your tool.

Recently I saw such an attachment a carpenter put on a router on a job site to get a modified set up. Came to mind here.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Maybe show a picture of the piece you are working on.

Consider attaching a stand off to the router base. It would be like a shim in a way that may allow only a portion of the bit to be exposed. Obviously it depends on the profile you are looking for and range of adjustment on your tool.

Recently I saw such an attachment a carpenter put on a router on a job site to get a modified set up. Came to mind here.
I'll grab a picture when i'm there. Haven't even gotten the particular boxes assembled yet.

Basically, it's a hole in a box, where a tweeter will live. I want to basically shape a wave guide that meets flush with the tweeter. Might have to be multiple layers and multiple bits. Will probably do it in stages, and take measurements to see what the different baffle surfaces yield.

I'm thinking my router is simply too small, both in that I don't know if I can get a 1/2" collet, and the base doesn't have enough surface area. But that spacer surface I think is a great idea. Must use patience and seek and experiment. Thanks for help.

Any favorite mid-sized routers? I've got a Cable Porter in my 'Home Depot' basket that looks like it has built-in attachment points that could serve quite well, either to mount a spacer, or to attach it to an improvised table mount.

Whatta (Other) Hobby!
 

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That's a bit that I would expect to see in a shaper or table mounted router. Your router is closer to a laminate trimmer size with a 1/4" shank vs the 1/2 that your shopping. If the opening in question is a door or walkway? You will never be able to finish close to the floor.
If your doing a window type opening it may be possible but very risky. Even a larger router may not have a large enough base to accept a 3 1/2" bit, but if it would, a piece of plexiglass could be made and attached to the base for a larger table and a wood block guide added.
In the morning, I'll head out to the shed to measure mine.
 

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I will suggest you stay away from those china brand bits. Maybe not so much the 1/2" shank ones, but they are pretty well known to be soft, among other things, and will bend and fly apart even without touching the wood. At 20k+ rpm, you might end up with stitches or having shrapnel dug out.

I'm a fan of Freud bits and think they make among the best and longest lasting bits.

I'm the last guy to get all overzealous about safety everything, but some things do demand it. IMO that bit is way too big to use in a hand router, even a full size one.
 

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As others have said, don't use a bit that large in a hand held router. I've made a lot of furniture over the years, and I would only use something that big in a router table, or a shaper that accepts router bits. To get the profile you're looking for you may be able to use two or more different bits, making multiple passes.
 

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Easy reply is that bit won't fit the router you show. That router is designed for trim use by hand and probably only has a collet for 1/4" shanks, plus the baseplate opening won't be large enough to enclose the edges of the bit's cutter head.

A bit that size (and I have a panel cutter very similar, plus door making mortise and tenon bits) will have quite a bit of torque at the edges, and should be used in a table, where it can remain stationary and the work piece moved. Even if you had it in a larger router, using it by hand to rout the inside of a hole would be problematic. Half the width of the bit is 1-3/4" (from pilot bearing to the edge) and that's a lot to manage. It could be done, with a series of passes, starting with the bit only making a slight cut, and then setting the cutter depth down about 1/16" at a time until you have the cut like you want.

It would be nice to have a picture of your work piece and what you're trying to accomplish.
 
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Variable speed would definitely be required.

A bit this size will have a lot of centrifugal force.

Several passes is a good idea and I would look at using an oversized base plate as suggested. This would give you more stability.

We have the Dewalt, 2 Porter Cable's, and a Hitachi.

The Porter Cable are the best, Hitachi would be a close second and the Dewalt comes in last in our herd.

Soft start will help minimize the start-up torque and I'd be looking at 2hp to handle the bit and the large amount of drag it will generate in the cut.

A router table is a good idea to make this more controllable, but that will cost about as much again as the router did. If you'll use it again, get the router and table. If not, I'd build a jig and use a good router. Pick one with the on/off switch accessible from the operator handles. You'll want both hands on the wheel when it starts up.
 

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If the collet will take it and it won't hit any of the base structure, it should be fine. If you think the base is too small, remove the original and make a larger temporary one out of like 3/8" plywood and use longer countersunk screws (if old ones are too short) to hold it on. That way, you can bridge the hole and not have to worry about wobble. Make sure there's enough space around the bit so you can see what you are doing. Just be careful of breakout and have a good grip on the handles. You might want to make a "starter" shallow pass first, then the final one. That can be sort of by eye just to get the cut going or you can adjust the bit so it only takes like 1/3rd of the cut for first pass, then fix it for the final one. Make sure it's up to full speed before you start cutting, then ease it over to the cut. Used to do it all the time when I did cabinet work.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Thanks much all for the information.

I have a better handle on what is involved. This is the concept cross section....

This is definitely not to scale, and the front baffle would be at least two layers of 3/4" thick MDF, but it illustrates the intent.



However, last night I realized that if i'm going to round over the edges, with a 1 1/2" radius (and I would really rather have the larger radius), I don't have very much room for any kind of wave guide inletting (which I'd like also to have because it complements the edge radius in softening the transition in acoustic impedance and minimizes edge diffraction as the high frequency waves travel across the front baffle) so I need to make some choices, either in shifting the edge radius over so that it is offset and not complete the 90 degree curve, leave off at 45 degrees or whatever, reducing the radius somewhat, or simply punting on the idea of the any significant interior waveguide bevel.

The pile of information provided by you guys helps a lot in steering those decisions.

Going to suck it up and get a bigger router. Will need it anyway for doing the radiused edges.

If I gain some proficiency, I'm sure I'll find lots of things I can put shapes into. "Hey Honey, look what I did to the Microwave!" GI1.

I'm approaching this as a skill-building experience, so multiple attempts and intermediate failures are alright, but I'd also like to not lose any fingers or eyeballs, so maybe that huge (I assume) Chinese bit isn't really the right choice. The Freud bits look reassuringly nice. Something to keep in the contemplation cart.

Thanks again all. I knew there were some good brains here for picking!
 

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My vote is no. Besides, as others have said that is better suited for use in a router table. Need to watch the RPM of your router also. Too high an RPM could be dangerous when using a large diameter bit.
 

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I use a lot of the Freud bits, Bosch too. They both have good micro-grain carbide. Locally available for most needs.
Infinity makes some really good cutting tools too, but they are an order item for us.
Most bits will note the recommended maximum RPM on the package.
It would be a bad day indeed to have a bit explode because you over-revved it.
 

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Craftsman made by Emerson Electric in Paris TN and Murphy NC, had one that was professional grade. These were made mid 70's until mid 80's- when Ryobi under Emerson Electric on a price bid.

You can often find them unused, cast iron table, fixed height router base, together with an optional plunge base.

They also used the fixture of the cast iron table saw, that model router comes up from the bottom. Not good at wood working, so I don't know the terminology.

I want to say that dad said the one where the bit comes up from the bottom- it can be called a shaper or a router- it depends on the size.

When I built the set neck Les Paul copy, dad let me use the table router that the bit comes up from the bottom. The shaper was off limits. I was young- 14. Guitar is made from mahoghany piece, cherry slab in middle, mahogany with burly maple top- exotic wood was cheap then, ICE wasn't more worried about wood than illegal immigrants back then. Now ICE seizes more exotic wood than they arrest illegal immigrants. Seymour Duncan's were $59 a piece back then new. Pearly Gates and an un-named "2nd". You could plug the second into a Laney with 0 gain, and it sounded so hot that you could play Iommi or Angus Young or Blue Cheer with no gain, just scoop the mids. Hot pickup, they sold it for $20 as a 2nd- it had the serial and the Seymour Duncan name marked out. They sent it with a cover because it was defaced with a hand engraver.

If you can buy a vintage table router made by Emerson- it is really amazing the quality. As far as hand routers ? Their setup with the table, attachment for your hand router, and the hand router fixture that raised and lowered ? Very nice.
 
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