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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Summary - IMO, if you have a H&R Gun Co. or Smith, Ltd. receiver get it checked for surface and core hardness. The core hardness may be too high.

Smith, Ltd. M-14 serial number 0212 - The owner reports he bought this rifle used earlier this year. Based on wear appearance, the rifle had 1000 to 2000 rounds through it. The owner had a reputable M14 gunsmith examine it before he shot it. The receiver required some machining to clean up some sharp edges and out-of-dimension surfaces. The bolt was timed since the extractor was wearing on the breech. The receiver surface was measured at 60 HRC and about 45 HRC in the core. The receiver was annealed. The owner is very pleased with the rifle now.

H&R Gun Co. Semi Auto 7.62MM-M14 serial number 106X - The owner reports that he bought the rifle used but it appeared to be a true safe queen with no finish wear. The rifle was found to have satisfactory headspace by a reputable M14 gunsmith prior to shooting. The owner took the rifle to the range and shot it. After about seventy-five rounds (using nothing but Australian .308 surplus) the bolt failed to cycle. The owner reports, "a semi circle of probably 1/4 inch high and the width of the bolt hold open had broken out of the receiver right above the bolt hold open!!!" He visually examined the rifle and found no further evidence of damage.

M14 Receiver Hardness Requirements - USGI receiver drawing 7790189 requires a surface hardness of 68 to 71 HRD (converts to 56 to 60 HRC) and a core hardness of 28 to 42 HRC.

Background - Excerpts from M14 Rifle History and Development by Lee Emerson copyright 2005:

"H & R Gun Co. and Smith, Ltd.

Mr. Maunz sold his M14 rifle business to Smith Manufacturing in Toledo, OH about 1984. The semi-automatic M14 receiver master die was loaned to them as part of the sale. Smith Manufacturing produced complete Semi-Auto (M14 type) rifles built on investment cast H&R Gun Co. stamped receivers. The H&R Gun Co. Semi-Auto 7.62MM-M14 receivers were marked TOLEDO, OHIO though Smith Manufacturing was physically located in Holland, OH about fourteen miles to the west. H&R Gun Co. Semi-Auto 7.62MM-M14 rifles were assembled with Harrington & Richardson M14 parts kits imported in 1985 by Jack Friese (see Armscorp of America, Inc. and Armscorp USA, Inc.). All H&R Gun Co. models were originally sold as complete rifles by Smith Manufacturing. The highest serial number observed for an H&R Gun Co. Semi-Auto 7.62MM-M14 is 1126. Smith Manufacturing was operated by Carl Hinkelman and two other associates. As an aside, Carl Hinkelman lived in Toledo, OH within blocks of the Schuster family at the time (see Commercial Accessories). Karl Maunz was a consultant to Smith Manufacturing on the H&R Gun Co. project."

and

"Smith Manufacturing also produced Smith, Ltd. investment cast semi-automatic M14 type receivers. Smith, Ltd. receivers were made about 1987. Smith, Ltd. receivers were assembled as complete rifles and sold about 1987 and 1988 at Camp Perry shooting matches by Smith Manufacturing. The receiver quality is good and parts fit if using USGI and/or National Match parts is excellent, based on examination of Smith, Ltd. rifles serial numbered 0210, 0225, 0236 and 0237. A commercial manufacture bolt and commercial manufacture operating rod were found to be too thick to slide smoothly inside Smith, Ltd. serial number 0237.

Note

During the 1980s, there were four businesses or individuals with the name of Smith involved with commercial M14 rifles as manufacturers. Neal Smith of Smith Firearms (Mentor, OH) performed NFA registered select fire conversions of already-manufactured Springfield Armory, Inc. M1A rifles. Richard Smith and Ron Smith of Smith Enterprise, Inc. (then Mesa, AZ) produced semi-automatic and select fire M14 rifles stamped SMITH ENT. Melvin Smith of Valley Ordnance (Wilkes-Barre, PA) machined raw castings into M1A receivers for Springfield Armory, Inc. in Geneseo, IL. Smith Manufacturing (Holland, OH) produced Maunz Match Rifle, H&R Gun Co. and Smith, Ltd. semi-automatic M14 rifles and the first Armscorp of America M14 type receivers. None of these entities ever did any work for the others. Although Armscorp of America, Inc. sold Smith Enterprise, Inc. M-14 receivers and Smith Manufacturing made some Armscorp of America M14 receivers, there was never any connection or relationship between Smith Manufacturing (Holland, OH) and Smith Enterprise, Inc. (then Mesa, AZ). The similarity in names is purely coincidental."
 

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Summary - IMO, if you have a H&R Gun Co. or Smith, Ltd. receiver get it checked for surface and core hardness. The core hardness may be too high.

Smith, Ltd. M-14 serial number 0212 - The owner reports he bought this rifle used earlier this year. Based on wear appearance, the rifle had 1000 to 2000 rounds through it. The owner had a reputable M14 gunsmith examine it before he shot it. The receiver required some machining to clean up some sharp edges and out-of-dimension surfaces. The bolt was timed since the extractor was wearing on the breech. The receiver surface was measured at 60 HRC and about 45 HRC in the core. The receiver was annealed. The owner is very pleased with the rifle now.

H&R Gun Co. Semi Auto 7.62MM-M14 serial number 106X - The owner reports that he bought the rifle used but it appeared to be a true safe queen with no finish wear. The rifle was found to have satisfactory headspace by a reputable M14 gunsmith prior to shooting. The owner took the rifle to the range and shot it. After about seventy-five rounds (using nothing but Australian .308 surplus) the bolt failed to cycle. The owner reports, "a semi circle of probably 1/4 inch high and the width of the bolt hold open had broken out of the receiver right above the bolt hold open!!!" He visually examined the rifle and found no further evidence of damage.

M14 Receiver Hardness Requirements - USGI receiver drawing 7790189 requires a surface hardness of 68 to 71 HRD (converts to 56 to 60 HRC) and a core hardness of 28 to 42 HRC.

Background - Excerpts from M14 Rifle History and Development by Lee Emerson copyright 2005:

"H & R Gun Co. and Smith, Ltd.

Mr. Maunz sold his M14 rifle business to Smith Manufacturing in Toledo, OH about 1984. The semi-automatic M14 receiver master die was loaned to them as part of the sale. Smith Manufacturing produced complete Semi-Auto (M14 type) rifles built on investment cast H&R Gun Co. stamped receivers. The H&R Gun Co. Semi-Auto 7.62MM-M14 receivers were marked TOLEDO, OHIO though Smith Manufacturing was physically located in Holland, OH about fourteen miles to the west. H&R Gun Co. Semi-Auto 7.62MM-M14 rifles were assembled with Harrington & Richardson M14 parts kits imported in 1985 by Jack Friese (see Armscorp of America, Inc. and Armscorp USA, Inc.). All H&R Gun Co. models were originally sold as complete rifles by Smith Manufacturing. The highest serial number observed for an H&R Gun Co. Semi-Auto 7.62MM-M14 is 1126. Smith Manufacturing was operated by Carl Hinkelman and two other associates. As an aside, Carl Hinkelman lived in Toledo, OH within blocks of the Schuster family at the time (see Commercial Accessories). Karl Maunz was a consultant to Smith Manufacturing on the H&R Gun Co. project."

and

"Smith Manufacturing also produced Smith, Ltd. investment cast semi-automatic M14 type receivers. Smith, Ltd. receivers were made about 1987. Smith, Ltd. receivers were assembled as complete rifles and sold about 1987 and 1988 at Camp Perry shooting matches by Smith Manufacturing. The receiver quality is good and parts fit if using USGI and/or National Match parts is excellent, based on examination of Smith, Ltd. rifles serial numbered 0210, 0225, 0236 and 0237. A commercial manufacture bolt and commercial manufacture operating rod were found to be too thick to slide smoothly inside Smith, Ltd. serial number 0237.

Note

During the 1980s, there were four businesses or individuals with the name of Smith involved with commercial M14 rifles as manufacturers. Neal Smith of Smith Firearms (Mentor, OH) performed NFA registered select fire conversions of already-manufactured Springfield Armory, Inc. M1A rifles. Richard Smith and Ron Smith of Smith Enterprise, Inc. (then Mesa, AZ) produced semi-automatic and select fire M14 rifles stamped SMITH ENT. Melvin Smith of Valley Ordnance (Wilkes-Barre, PA) machined raw castings into M1A receivers for Springfield Armory, Inc. in Geneseo, IL. Smith Manufacturing (Holland, OH) produced Maunz Match Rifle, H&R Gun Co. and Smith, Ltd. semi-automatic M14 rifles and the first Armscorp of America M14 type receivers. None of these entities ever did any work for the others. Although Armscorp of America, Inc. sold Smith Enterprise, Inc. M-14 receivers and Smith Manufacturing made some Armscorp of America M14 receivers, there was never any connection or relationship between Smith Manufacturing (Holland, OH) and Smith Enterprise, Inc. (then Mesa, AZ). The similarity in names is purely coincidental."
I am the owner of H&R Gun Co. M-14 Serial #1126(reportedly, the last one made by the company) It is in pristine condition and I am in doubt that it was ever fired. It is my absolute favorite rifle! It is Absotively Beautimus!!
 

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I am the owner of H&R Gun Co. M-14 Serial #1126(reportedly, the last one made by the company) It is in pristine condition and I am in doubt that it was ever fired. It is my absolute favorite rifle! It is Absotively Beautimus!!
Well if your going to wake a long sleeping thread , the least you could do is posts some decent pictures of your beloved M14. Your sure it’s not one of those cut up rewelds? If it is, I hope it doesn’t have those horrible looking poorly done weld lines like those done a short time ago.

REN :cool:
 

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Well if your going to wake a long sleeping thread , the least you could do is posts some decent pictures of your beloved M14. Your sure it’s not one of those cut up rewelds? If it is, I hope it doesn’t have those horrible looking poorly done weld lines like those done a short time ago.

REN :cool:
L'ingMAO!! I will post some tomorrow! No horrible or or poor welds...Thought it would be worth a wake up call, seeing as how it surfaced after 36 years and has seemingly avoided molestation of any kind!
 

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I am the owner of H&R Gun Co. M-14 Serial #1126(reportedly, the last one made by the company) It is in pristine condition and I am in doubt that it was ever fired. It is my absolute favorite rifle! It is Absotively Beautimus!!
L'ingMAO!! I will post some tomorrow! No horrible or or poor welds...Thought it would be worth a wake up call, seeing as how it surfaced after 36 years and has seemingly avoided molestation of any kind!
"It's hard to lead a Cavalry charge, if you think you look funny on a horse!" AS
 

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Will you please show us the heel! I can see your dismount notch, your beautiful M14 is semi-auto only.

I would like to know more about it, does it have any USGI parts, who built it and who made the receiver.

Whatta Hobby!

REN:cool:
 

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Good eye, on the selector..I did not do it to fool anyone...looks better than two holes and cheaper than a tax stamp! Receiver is H&R Gun Company...all the remaining parts are H/R(Harrington/Richardson)(Milsurp). Somehow, I think Smith Mfg. did the HR initial thing on purpose! PS: Read the original post! Lmao!..the one I woke up! Also, I made the selector and connector so they can be easily removed.
 

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Good eye, on the selector..I did not do it to fool anyone...looks better than two holes and cheaper than a tax stamp! Receiver is H&R Gun Company...all the remaining parts are H/R(Harrington/Richardson)(Milsurp). Somehow, I think Smith Mfg. did the HR initial thing on purpose! PS: Read the original post! Lmao!..the one I woke up! Also, I made the selector and connector so they can be easily removed.
 
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