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This has been an interesting year on the Forum, lots of new members with lots of good questions. The best part has been many of our old members have picked up the ball in responding to the New people asking old questions, someday it will be their turn to fill your place..

This Thread is information regarding the use of Shims, the material is not new but worth repeating as it has been sometime since I first suggested using Brass shims instead of the usual Stainless steel shims. I use Brass shims and this is the reason why.. Brass shims will compress when the cylinder lock is torqued to the proper position, stainless steel shims will will not compress, what compresses is the shoulder on the barrel, it is set back that amount, depending on how much torque is used, and how much the gas plug threads are set back. I know this is not what a number of our respected Members recommend or use, however in talking to them they have never tried brass shims.. This is not to suggest SS shims will not work, but they work in a different manner..

If you were to use SS shims and draw up the cyl lock from a position about the 4:00 o'clock position, this would be very tight, the result would be a slight lowering of the barrel muzzle, the barrel will bend, fire enough rounds down this barrel and a dark spot will show up at the bend point. Using a 5;00 to 5;30 lock position is recommended... I have witnessed this over torqued lock in several M14's that had USGI NM barrels.. Oddly enough these M14's were very accurate, across the course Match rifles, but not for very long...

Another thing that was noticeable in the continued use of SS shims, more shims or thicker shims were required each time the cylinder was reseated.. The above is my opinion and suggestion to those that like to think outside the box.


Merry Christmas...Art
 

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Thanks and Merry Christmas to you, Art.

Copy, brass is a very useful material today as it was to the Romans. Your experience with brass shim washers against the barrel shoulder makes sense. You're getting the best between shims as a stabilizer/tightener and the capacity for slight longitudinal flex produced by a well-fitted screw & glue unitization. The nutshell version of that would be it compensates for imperfection in the turning of the shoulder during barrel manufacture.

Allow me to add, small strips of brass glassed into the surface on each lower edge of a wooden stock where the M14's trigger group's feet bed in is an effective compression preventative. I prefer to do that than loosen the trigger group when I put the gun up, only to have to slap it back in when I want to shoot it again.

Brass and steel in contact are inoffensive to one another, no breeding ground for oxidation or galvanic reaction.
 

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Art
I have seen SS shims for sale here in the PX and Elsewhere. So I ask Where Can you Get/Find Brass Shims
For your time and Effort
Grazie Mille
 

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Art
I have seen SS shims for sale here in the PX and Elsewhere. So I ask Where Can you Get/Find Brass Shims
For your time and Effort
Grazie Mille
My question also . . where can one f1nd these brass shims of which ye speak . . MCORPS1
 

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I just Goggled brass shims and found some sources for shim stock. It can be had in various thicknesses. Some come in rolls, others in sheet form. Looks like a place to start. Now to cut it to size needed. Scissors?
 
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