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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I went a little nuts last night on the M40 build. Original intent was to use the JbWood Weld for a tan color and only focus on the recoil lug.

Well, after a first go, there was very little contact... I did a second go with the wood weld and it solidified in a couple minutes and I couldn’t properly fit the lug. After pulling out the tacky stuff I found the stock barrel channel was too tight at the lug. I had floated the barrel but overlooked overall fit.

After identifying the JBWood Weld sets to quickly and the stock issues, I started from scratch. Refitted the entire stock for good contact throughout. I puttied the receiver and use the kiwi neutral shoe polish.

After coming to the realization that this isn’t even a “clone” since it’s got a shilen stainless barrel, timney trigger and redfield 700 mounts, I decided to go with the JBWeld and go full bed.

I was nervous this morning... the thing was epoxied at 0100 last night... 0700 rolled around, the 0730... waiting I finally investigated my work. Had my three year old tapping the barrel with a rubber mallet while I tapped just inside the bottom of the receiver to her cadence. She came out!!!

Last picture is trimmed up. I’ll need to oil the stock a bit on the edges but I’m VERY HAPPY I didn’t glue the dang thing into on inseparable piece!

Edit: thank you TonyBen for your videos... they are some seriously in-depth instructionals.
 

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Looks good.

Question: do you install the action and tighten the action screws? When I bed a bolt-action, I install extra-length screws into the barreled action with the heads machined off and a slot milled into the exposed end of the shank. After I apply the bedding compound (and after everything is coated in release agent), I seat the action, place matchbook covers cut as spacers at the tip of the stock to free-float the barrel, and place a heavy bag of shot atop the action to press it down and keep it seated until the bedding compound sets. I never torque the screws, as any potential inletting issues in the stock that can contribute to pressure on one side of the action or the other is eliminated by letting the action “seat itself”.

Once set, I back out the screws and whack the barrel with a soft-faced hammer to release the barreled action and proceed as normal.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thx bdhuntr, I actually did none of that and now that you say it, will probably do that next time lol I think I was focused on the fit of the stock prior to bedding and then cranking it down so it “fit” as it set.. I focused on lines of the stock. I think I achieved what I set out to do but your advice will be put to use next time.

I had to relieve a bit in the stock due to the barrel diameter. The stock definitely wasn’t cut for this setup but now it should have some good lines (I hope). Thx for the advice.

Looks good.

Question: do you install the action and tighten the action screws? When I bed a bolt-action, I install extra-length screws into the barreled action with the heads machined off and a slot milled into the exposed end of the shank. After I apply the bedding compound (and after everything is coated in release agent), I seat the action, place matchbook covers cut as spacers at the tip of the stock to free-float the barrel, and place a heavy bag of shot atop the action to press it down and keep it seated until the bedding compound sets. I never torque the screws, as any potential inletting issues in the stock that can contribute to pressure on one side of the action or the other is eliminated by letting the action “seat itself”.

Once set, I back out the screws and whack the barrel with a soft-faced hammer to release the barreled action and proceed as normal.
 

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I left out a (important) step lol. Been quite a while since I bedded a rifle.

To start, I take the stock and remove quite a bit of wood, leaving some points at the original height. This allows a thicker base of bedding compound vs what could amount to a very thin layer (depending on how the stock was originally inletted and how tight the action seats). Then I follow the other steps I outlined.

Some are definitely easier than others. Rugers are a bear with that angled recoil lug.
 

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Hi,
VERY nice...

But, then you had some excellent help!USN5

Teach them young!RNGR2
 

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When I do a bolt gun I will make pillars and epoxy them into the stock, for a 700, the pillars are contoured to match the bottom of the receiver, for a M70 the are flat. I will bolt the pillars to the receiver, put epoxy on them and in the holes in the stock. I have before hand put tape around the barrel at the front of the stock so that the barreled action does not rock when sitting in the stock. Once the epoxied pillars have cured, I will then bed just the complete receiver and torque the action into the stock. This has worked well in the past as I usually only get about .001 movement when tightening or loosening the action screws. This is done by mounting a dial indicator on the barrel and the pointer on the stock to see the deflection, .003 is considered good.

John
 
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