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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thirty years of dust and goo. Some rust in the rear sight slider, loose butt stock and a few buggered screws. After soaking the bore cleaned right up and look like new. Replaced the damaged magazine with a new one from old stock I didn't know I had.



Important numbers all match tons of proofs on the barrel and receiver.



Correct dated 1942 sling and bayonet frog and proper 1907 Bayonet.



Range ready I hope. What do the Enfield followers think ?
 

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Is that lot number on the receiver also on the barrel and bolt handle. Which face of bolt handle front or rear?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Is that lot number on the receiver also on the barrel and bolt handle. Which face of bolt handle front or rear?

Lot number ?

Rifle ser# on rear of bolt handle barrel and receiver. 1942 date and proofs all over the knox form. Next time I take the top wood off I will post pictures of the barrel stamping.

.
 

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Beautiful Mk III. That's what I think.

How does accuracy compare between Mk III and Mk IVs?
 

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I said lot number I guess you could call it a production number. This was stamped on the barrel, receiver and bolt handle when the pieces were first mated in production however the Brits also, when issued, employed what Skennerton calls in his book a serial number commonly a letter and 4 or 5 digit number. I was asking as I was curious if yours was numbered in a similar fashion as my 42 Lithgow.
446080
 

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Thirty years of dust and goo. Some rust in the rear sight slider, loose butt stock and a few buggered screws. After soaking the bore cleaned right up and look like new. Replaced the damaged magazine with a new one from old stock I didn't know I had.



Important numbers all match tons of proofs on the barrel and receiver.



Correct dated 1942 sling and bayonet frog and proper 1907 Bayonet.



Range ready I hope. What do the Enfield followers think ?
sweet. I had one. Best bolt action of ww2
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was lucky that I had an as new magazine as the one with the rifle had been deformed from the top by a drift used to remove the spread body of the magazine. Didn't know I had the spare and was about to take a plastic hammer to the original. I also have a long Lee five round that fit and fed well but that will remain in the spares box now.
Are those both true "T" models?

yes
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I said lot number I guess you could call it a production number. This was stamped on the barrel, receiver and bolt handle when the pieces were first mated in production however the Brits also, when issued, employed what Skennerton calls in his book a serial number commonly a letter and 4 or 5 digit number. I was asking as I was curious if yours was numbered in a similar fashion as my 42 Lithgow.
View attachment 446080

As I recall Lithgow didn't start with prefix letters the 1918-1922 starting with the A prefix.1016 to 1918 rifles were just numbers.

My 1944 Lithgow has a E prefix.





The the British will have a bog standard five digit number issued in blocks I believe.



I could be wrong and usually am.



I have two 1942 Dispersal rifles now and both are just numbered.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
TJ , nice 44 Lithgow. Tnx for post
Thank you Douglas but my photo skills need a lot of work still. I'm self taught and only have second grade equipment.

I proper lens for wide angle close up shots would help but oh dear the the lens would cost the price of a new motor bike.

Would you have a spare sliding rear sight element ? I have a bit of a rust issue with my next project.

 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
My first Dispersal rifle.



Dispersal rifle;

"Roughly, after the 1940 bombing of the Small Heath BSA plant, SMLE production was "dispersed" to smaller facilities in the Birmingham area.
BSA was the only producer of rifles in the UK
icon

at the time, No4 production hadn't even started, so this was mildly important.

From personal observation, the rifles continued the BSA pre-war serial number letter prefixes through L,M and N from 1940-43. Receivers were MkIII (to 1941)and MkIII* from BSA stock, barrels were new made and carry Enfield inspection marks. Furniture can be Walnut or Beech, salvaged or new.
In 1944, salvaged receivers outside of the L-M-N series were built up into rifles with barrels that were also reused---in one case, a barrel from a 1941 Dispersal rifle was renumbered to match a '44 receiver.
The 1944 rifles also have an "FTR" mark at the bottom of the roll stamp marking on the buttsocket---I have not seen a '44 (8 examples) without this yet, but it is possible there are such rifles."

From 'krinko', Milsurps.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
For stock upgrade and fitting went well. Original numbered to receiver butt matched OK too.



 
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