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    1. · Registered
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      Thanks for the feedback. What would the status of the TG be for this test? Locked in or just cammed over?

      As I mentioned previously the TG on this rifle locks up extremely tight so I'd be surprised if the heel was able to move with the TG locked in...
      The test would be done with the TG locked up. (BTW, an easier way to lock up is to use something like this to pull the heel down on the stock before you close the trigger guard.) The basic idea is to prevent the receiver from rotating sideways in the stock, even a little bit. Unless it's rear or double lugged, the only parts of the receiver that are in contact with the inside surface of the stock are the outer faces of the receiver legs and the section just forward of the legs. If the fit there isn't extremely tight, a small amount of rotation is possible (which is what the test of movement of the heel over the stock is designed to disclose). And if there's a little rotation at the receiver, imagine how much displacement there is way down at the end of the stock/barrel contact point (front band lip/ferrule). The tension intended to guide the barrel back to it's rest point on the ferrule would be guiding it to a different place every time, not a good thing.

      Even if the heel is really tight against the top of the stock, if there's some slop between the legs or the section forward and the stock, you can still get a bit of sideways movement there and a lot at the ferrule.

      Using shims to raise the heel even further off the stock would make locking up even harder or maybe impossible. But using the "L" shaped shims just inside the stock would tighten the fit without tightening the lockup. In any case, thinking of that tension as part of the "see-saw" motion has the ferrule end of the stock being pulled down (creating tension) as the back end of the stock is pulled up to meet the heel. Since that's what's happening to you, I bet you've got the tension, just not the clearance so it can be demonstrated or operational.
       
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      The test would be done with the TG locked up. (BTW, an easier way to lock up is to use something like this to pull the heel down on the stock before you close the trigger guard.) The basic idea is to prevent the receiver from rotating sideways in the stock, even a little bit. Unless it's rear or double lugged, the only parts of the receiver that are in contact with the inside surface of the stock are the outer faces of the receiver legs and the section just forward of the legs. If the fit there isn't extremely tight, a small amount of rotation is possible (which is what the test of movement of the heel over the stock is designed to disclose). And if there's a little rotation at the receiver, imagine how much displacement there is way down at the end of the stock/barrel contact point (front band lip/ferrule). The tension intended to guide the barrel back to it's rest point on the ferrule would be guiding it to a different place every time, not a good thing.

      Even if the heel is really tight against the top of the stock, if there's some slop between the legs or the section forward and the stock, you can still get a bit of sideways movement there and a lot at the ferrule.

      Using shims to raise the heel even further off the stock would make locking up even harder or maybe impossible. But using the "L" shaped shims just inside the stock would tighten the fit without tightening the lockup. In any case, thinking of that tension as part of the "see-saw" motion has the ferrule end of the stock being pulled down (creating tension) as the back end of the stock is pulled up to meet the heel. Since that's what's happening to you, I bet you've got the tension, just not the clearance so it can be demonstrated or operational.
      I think the light bulb just lit over my head reading your explanation and re-reading the shimming thread. I may even have comprehension. Thanks for the detailed explanation.
       
    1. · Registered
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      I *think* my rifle is ok but it does seem to take ALOT of force to close the trigger guard. On the GI walnut stock, the tension starts before the tip of the trigger & on the factory synthetic, it barely gets to the trigger before it gets HARD. It also looks like I am actallly shaving off some metal from the small arms on the trigger guard. Is this too tight? Or am I just being a Nancy??
      Question: before you start to lock up the trigger guard, is there space under the heel of the receiver? And as the locking up proceeds, does the space diminish so that when you're done, the heel is pulled tightly against the stock? If yes, then you might try making things easier for the trigger guard by using a bar clamp to pull the heel down on the stock and then lock up the trigger guard. What you're really doing as you pull the heel down on the stock is forcing the front of the stock to rotate away from the barrel (see "see-saw" in post #2). Since the front band lip is preventing that, you're essentially bending the stock (which results in that tension) and, to a lesser extent the barrel. With a stiff stock, the locking up process can be difficult and hard on the trigger guard. The bar clamp solves that.
       
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